19 High-Paying Jobs For People Who Don't Like Stress



You don't have to sacrifice sanity for a solid paycheck



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By Jacquelyn Smith

Think there's no such thing as a high-paying, low-stress job?

Think again.

The stress tolerance for each job is a rating on a scale from zero to 100, where a lower rating signals less stress. It measures how frequently workers must accept criticism and deal effectively with high stress on the job. The data was gathered from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and Occupational Information Network (O*NET).

1. Material Scientist

1/19

Stress tolerance: 53.0
Average annual salary: $94,350
What they do: Research and study substances at the atomic and molecular levels and the ways in which substances react with each other; use knowledge to develop new and improved products.
Education requirements: At least a bachelor’s degree; master’s degree or Ph.D. is needed for many research jobs.
Stress tolerance is measured by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and Occupational Information Network, with lower scores indicating less stress on the job.


2. Food Scientist

2/19

Stress tolerance: 55.8
Average annual salary: $66,870
What they do: Ensure that agricultural establishments are productive and food is safe.
Education requirements: At least a bachelor’s degree from an accredited postsecondary institution; many get a doctoral degree.
Stress tolerance is measured by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and Occupational Information Network, with lower scores indicating less stress on the job.


3. Mathematician

3/19

Stress tolerance: 57.3
Average annual salary: $104,350
What they do: Conduct research in fundamental mathematics or in application of mathematical techniques to science, management, and other fields. Solve problems in various fields using mathematical methods.
Education requirements: Bachelor's or master's degree for those who want to work in government, and a doctorate may be required to work for private companies.
Stress tolerance is measured by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and Occupational Information Network, with lower scores indicating less stress on the job.


Read More:  19 High-Paying Jobs For People Who Don't Like Stress

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