Best Jobs For College Grads In 2013

new jobs in 2013

By Susan Ricker


If the Mayan calendar predictions are wrong and the world continues into 2013, those with bachelor's degrees will have an extra reason to celebrate the New Year. CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists have released the best bachelor's degree jobs for 2013 based on occupations with the most added jobs since 2010, and the list covers a wide variety of industries.

"Where the U.S. will produce the most jobs in 2013 is likely to follow growth patterns of the last few years," says Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder. "It's no surprise that technology and engineering occupations comprise six of the top 10 positions on our list, but workers should also see more opportunities in production-related fields, marketing, health care and financial services. The competition for educated, specialized labor has intensified as market demands increase in both the manufacturing and services sectors."

Check out the top 18 jobs for 2013 that require, on average, a bachelor's degree, along with the number of jobs added and percent growth since 2010.
  1. Software developer (applications and systems software): 70,872 jobs added, 7 percent growth

  2. Accountant and auditor: 37,123 jobs added, 3 percent growth

  3. Market research analyst and marketing specialist: 31,335 jobs added, 10 percent growth

  4. Computer systems analyst: 26,937 jobs added, 5 percent growth

  5. Human resources, training and labor relations specialist: 22,773 jobs added, 5 percent growth

  6. Network and computer systems administrator: 18,626 jobs added, 5 percent growth

  7. Sales representative (wholesale and manufacturing, technical and scientific): 17,405 jobs added, 4 percent growth

  8. Information security analyst, Web developer and computer network architect: 15,715 jobs added, 5 percent growth

  9. Mechanical engineer: 13,847 jobs added, 6 percent growth

  10. Industrial engineer: 12,269 jobs added, 6 percent growth

  11. Computer programmer: 11,540 jobs added, 3 percent growth

  12. Financial analyst: 10,016 jobs added, 4 percent growth

  13. Public relations specialist: 8,541 jobs added, 4 percent growth

  14. Logistician: 8,522 jobs added, 8 percent growth

  15. Database administrator: 7,468 jobs added, 7 percent growth

  16. Meeting, convention and event planner: 7,072 jobs added, 10 percent growth

  17. Cost estimator: 6,781 jobs added, 3 percent growth

  18. Personal financial adviser: 5,212 jobs added, 3 percent growth

14 Good Jobs That Don't Require A College Degree

CareerCast.com releases its list of best jobs for high school grads. As tough as the labor market is, college grads still have an easier time than those with only a high school degree. In February, college graduates had an unemployment rate of 3.8 percent -- compared to a staggering 11 percent for those with only a high school diploma. Still, a new study released Tuesday shows that there are some good careers out there for those who lack a four-year degree.

CareerCast.com, the job-portal site, compiled a list of 14 good careers that require only a high school degree (though some require additional training). The site used a variety of criteria to assess the quality of the careers, including salary, how physically demanding the positions are, and emotional factors such as the fields' competitiveness, potential hazards and stress. Those with the lowest score received the highest ranking. CareerCast.com also looked at the potential income and employment growth for the decade ending in 2020, using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Overall, the 14 jobs for high school grads offer an average median salary of $41,307, which means the group is in line with the overall average salary for all Americans. The highest paying job on the list offers a median salary of $77,000 a year. But several of the careers on Careercast's list offer incomes of around $20,000.

The list includes careers that have long been popular trades for Americans who don't attend college. But Careercast also identified tech positions that are in high demand, and often don't require a degree, just skill. Still, expect to be paid less without a college degree. "Business owners don't always want to pay market rate if you don't have a degree," Sol Hershkowitz, of New York-based Viasoft.com, told CareerCast, according to its news release.

Check out CareerCast.com's list of "14 Great Jobs Without a College Degree":
1. Administrative/executive assistant
Jobs-rated rank: 75.
Median salary: $34,660.
Job growth: 12 percent.

2. Automobile body repairer
Jobs-rated rank: 77.
Median salary: $34,660.
Job growth: 17 percent.

3. Bookkeeper
Jobs-rated rank: 71.
Median salary: $34,040.
Job growth: 14 percent.

4. Communications equipment mechanic
Jobs-rated rank: 84.
Median salary: $54,710.
Job growth: 15 percent.

5. Electrician
Jobs-rated rank: 76.
Median salary: $48,250.
Job growth: 23 percent.

6. Glazier
Jobs-rated rank: 59.
Median salary: $36,640.
Job growth: 42 percent.

7. Hair stylist
Jobs-rated rank: 83.
Median salary: $22,500.
Job growth: 14 percent.

8. Industrial machine repairer
Jobs-rated rank: 44.
Median salary: $44,160.
Job growth: 19 percent.

9. Paralegal assistant
Jobs-rated rank: 41.
Median Salary: $46,680.
Job Growth: 18 percent.

10. Pest control worker
Jobs-rated rank: 95.
Median salary: $30,340.
Job growth: 24 percent.

11. Plumber
Jobs-rated rank: 66.
Median salary: $46,660.
Job growth: 26 percent.

12. Receptionist
Jobs-rated rank: 86.
Median salary: $25,240.
Job growth: 24 percent.

13. Skincare specialist
Jobs-rated rank: 43.
Median salary: $28,920.
Job growth: 25 percent.

14. Web developer
Jobs-rated rank: 24.
Median salary: $75,660.
Job growth: 22 percent.

The Most Dangerous Industry For Workers

health care injuriesWhere do most workplace injuries happen? Oil drilling, you might think, or construction, or truck driving. But in an ironic twist, the workers in the most dangerous industry don't have to go very far if they get injured; they work in the health care sector.

According to a new report by Public Citizen's Congress Watch, a consumer advocacy group, nearly half -- 45 percent -- of all incidents of workplace violence that result in lost workdays occur in the health care industry. Nursing aides, orderlies and attendants are seven times more likely than the average worker to suffer musculoskeletal disorders (requiring days off work), according to the latest data, and also seven times more likely to be injured in an assault on the job.

"I think a lot of the reasons may have to do with people being on medication, and being off medication," explains Keith Wreightson, the work safety and health advocate at Public Citizen's Congress Watch, and a co-author of the report. He believes many of the violent incidents occur in psychiatric facilities, and in general, "a lot of people are not particularly happy to be in a health care facility. They're angry."

Workplace Not Monitored: The Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the federal body tasked with ensuring workplace safety, devotes only a fraction of its attention to the health care industry compared to other high-risk occupations, according to the Congress Watch report, which was created with assistance from the Service Employees International Union. Part of the reason is that there are only a tiny number of regulations on the books that affect the sector.

"If they show up in a health care facility, there's nothing to cite them on, fine them on, write them up on, or say anything about it," says Wreightson. "... Employers in the health care industry are more likely to be cited for frayed electrical cords over physical harm or ergonomic harm to an employee."

And while injury rates are falling in other risky professions, in the health care industry, injuries and illnesses are rising. Workplace violence alone, which OSHA calls "a recognized hazard" in the industry, jumped 13 percent between 2009 and 2010.

Enormous Number of Cases: The private health care industry doesn't have the highest rate for all injuries and illnesses, but with such a enormous workforce, it has the highest number. In 2010, there were almost 654,000 cases in the health and social assistance sector, 152,000 more cases than the next highest -- manufacturing. And when it comes to back injuries, disease, and workplace violence, health care workers are particularly vulnerable, the report states, with rates far exceeding the national average. Health care workers experience percutaneous injuries -- punctures of the skin with sharp instruments or needles -- 400,000 times a year, which can pose a high risk of exposure to HIV and hepatitis.




Despite the staggering number of injuries among health care workers, the report documents how OSHA conducts very few inspections of health care workplaces. Employers in the health care and social assistance sector reported more than twice the number of injuries than employers in construction, yet OSHA conducted more than 52,000 inspections of construction sites in 2010, compared to 2,500 inspections of health care facilities. At the same time, the report adds, construction workers are far more likely to die on the job than anyone working in health care.

"Thirty years ago we had an economy that was based on industry and manufacturing and we've drastically stepped away from that in a matter of years," says Wreightson. "OSHA has not been able to kept up with that pace increase. ... It's completely blinded them essentially that health care is now the biggest industry in the United States."


The Public Citizen's Congress Watch recommends more standards in the industry, such as one concerning ergononomic stressors to reduce back injuries and a zero-tolerance approach to verbal and physical abuse. When OSHA issued a new rule in 1991 requiring health care facilities to offer free hepatitis B vaccinations, the report points out, infections declined from 17,000 cases in 1983 to 400 in 1995.

But new regulations are always tricky to pass, particularly in recent years. OSHA actually issued an ergonomics standard in 2000, but in 2001, the House and Senate repealed it before it took effect.

10 Best Jobs In Construction In 2013

construction jobsBy Jada A. Graves

As one of the hardest-hit industries during the Great Recession, construction saw its largest percentage decline in employment in the post-World War II era, 13.7 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. And as the country began to claw its way out of the economic muck, the BLS had the highest recovery hopes for this goods-producing industry. In its last biennial employment projections report, released in February 2012, the BLS predicted numerous construction jobs among the fastest-growing from 2010 to 2020. It was one of the most off-the-mark predictions the government agency made, however. Growth in this sector has been evident, but far from fast. The estimated unemployment rate for construction slid from a chilling 20.6 percent in 2010 to 16.4 percent in 2011, and 13.9 percent in 2012. All construction jobs are subject to the fluctuations of the economy, and as yet, our economy is still grasping for footing. The construction workers who are finding work are those with experience.

Fortunately, our U.S. News Best Construction Jobs aren't simply based on employment projections, but also on actual unemployment rates, salaries, good job prospects, plus advancement possibilities, low stress and a steady work-life balance. Here are the 10 jobs we picked, where the odds of finding a job could be in your favor.
1. Cost Estimator
Average Salary: $62,670

There's a myth that every construction job involves manual labor -- not true. A cost estimator does occasionally don a hard hat and get his or her hands dirty on a construction site, but he or she also spends considerable time crunching numbers in a sterile office. Cost estimators are involved in both high-level and minuscule decisions of budgeting, and so they must remain familiar with a site's resources but also be adept with computers and various estimating software. Some cost estimators are charged with budgeting the cost of a project from start to finish, while others are hired to budget specifics, like the electrical component. A bachelor's degree in an industry-related field is the most common starting point, but voluntarily pursuing certification will give you even more of an edge. The BLS predicts that those with knowledge of Building Information Modeling software should have the strongest chances.

Fairbanks, Alaska, Santa Barbara, Calif., and Framingham, Mass., pay estimators the highest salaries, according to the BLS.
2. Construction Manager
Average Salary: $93,900

There's also a myth that those who work in a blue-collar industry don't earn a lot of green. This occupation disproves that. In 2011, construction managers' average salary was just shy of $95,000, putting them in a higher pay bracket than some computer systems analysts and civil engineers. To become the professional responsible for planning and budgeting a construction project, you'll most likely need a bachelor's degree in construction science, building science, or a related field. An associate's degree, when married with relevant experience, could also serve as an appropriate entry. Other crucial traits for a construction manager include: analytical skills for troubleshooting project snags; some managerial experience so you can be adept at finding and supervising staff; and strong communication skills for writing proposals and budget plans. Population growth and heightened demand for more office buildings, hospitals and infrastructure should elevate job prospects for those qualified.

In 2011, New York state had one of the highest employment levels for this occupation, plus it also paid its managers well: The metropolitan areas of Elmira, Nassau, and New York City all report average salaries of at least $135,000 to the BLS.

3. Plumber
Average Salary: $51,830

It's the troubleshooting component of a plumber's duties that most of us are familiar with, but there's so much more to this job. After a four- to five-year apprenticeship, plumbers are versed in blueprints and building codes and have the know-how to install, maintain, and repair water and drainage pipes for small appliances, as well as large septic systems. Employment demand in this field is spurred by a few factors: new building construction, the installation of more-efficient, low-flow plumbing systems, and a vast number of boomer plumbers who are expected to retire soon.

Densely populated states like Texas, California, and New York are among those with the highest employment level of plumbers, but some of the top-paying metropolitan areas for this field might surprise you: The BLS reports that Vineland, N.J., Peabody, Mass., and Madison, Wis., compensate plumbers especially well.
4. Glazier
Average Salary: $41,620

In this profession, you absolutely cannot be afraid of heights: glaziers cut, install, fasten, seal and remove glass for windows, skylights and storefronts. And it also helps to be multifaceted, since the BLS reports that employers prefer glaziers who can handle a range of tasks. The majority of those currently employed are working in foundation, structure, and building exteriors, but new commercial construction and the need to retrofit and repair existing structures could drive hiring demand for indoor projects as well.

If previous hiring trends are any indication, you'll want to look west: California, Texas and Washington have some of the highest levels of employment, plus the metropolitan areas of San Jose, Calif., and Oakland, Calif., tend to pay particularly well.


5. Cement Mason & Concrete Finisher
Average Salary: $39,370

Concrete is a common foundation for many construction projects, and using it involves installing rebar and other reinforcing materials, pouring a cement mixture, spreading and leveling that mixture, monitoring its hardening, and applying sealants. Like other construction workers, cement masons and concrete finishers learn their trade during a formal apprenticeship, but those who also take masonry-related courses should experience the best job opportunities, according to the BLS.

Although work in this industry is often dependent on dry, warm weather, the top-paying metropolitan areas are northern locales: Nassau, N.Y., Fairbanks, Alaska, and Bloomington, Ill., each paid average salaries that were higher than $75,000 in 2011.

6. Painter
Average Salary: $38,830

One plus to painting is that those with limited or no experience could find work. The basic qualifications to wield your first brush are a minimum age of 18, a high school diploma or GED, and the physical ability to do the work. But the greenest painters could face tough competition finding -- and keeping -- employment when competing with union workers who have completed a three- or four-year apprenticeship program and have become certified. If you're hoping to make painting a career, it's prudent to begin an apprenticeship where you'll receive both technical training and practical experience.

In 2011, the BLS noted that the states that employed the most painters were California, Florida, Illinois, New York and Texas. Illinois also shelters the best-paid in the field. In 2011, the average annual wage for a painter in the Kankakee, Ill., area was $69,880.
7. Brickmason & Blockmason
Average Salary: $50,760

Brick and stone exteriors are expensive but they still remain popular building materials due to their durability. As the economy and housing market rebounds, new buildings should be erected that use these materials and require the skilled masons to lay them. Older brick buildings will need repair. For these reasons, the BLS predicts that employment for brickmasons and blockmasons could balloon 40 percent before 2020. It's possible to learn some basics on the job, but studying masonry at a technical college or entering an apprenticeship are also a common training pathways. Programs usually last at least three years.

Large cities like Boston, Detroit and San Francisco compensate brickmasons and blockmasons particularly well. Although the average salary in 2011 was a little more than $50,000, according to the BLS, workers in the aforementioned cities earned more than $70,000 annually. Boston brickmasons nearly eclipsed $90,000 in 2011.

8. Electrician
Average Salary: $52,910

The road to becoming a Master or Journeyman Electrician is long: it starts with a high school diploma or GED, followed by a four- or five-year apprenticeship with on-the-job training and lessons in electrical theory, electrical codes and mathematics. Most states require you to pass a licensing exam before you begin working independently, and specialized training in soldering, fire alarms, and elevators might also be necessary.

The top-paying metropolitan areas for this occupation are Vallejo, Calif., New York City, and Fairbanks, Alaska.
9. Carpenter
Average Salary: $44,330

Carpentry is one of the oldest construction professions as well as one of the most versatile. You could choose to work on a smaller scale, building frameworks for residences, or on a slightly larger scale, insulating a high-rise office building, or even on a colossal scale, fortifying trusses for bridges. Carpenters' exposure to all components of a construction project make them one of the more secure professions within the industry, although they, too, could be employment victims of the fickle economy. Those with the best employment chances have completed an apprenticeship and preferably can speak both Spanish and English.

The best-paid workers are employed in some pretty scenic places, like Honolulu, San Francisco and Santa Cruz, Calif.

10. Construction Worker
Average Salary: $34,170

The pros: With little to no experience, a general construction laborer or helper could get hired to do odd tasks on a site, and just about every construction site needs workers to assist with loading and unloading materials, making measurements, digging ditches, operating equipment, and cleanup. Now the cons: General construction laborers often don't have any formal education requirement or licensing to start work, so the spectrum of "experience" someone has working in this field is immense. The most seasoned and multifaceted have the best opportunities, while the rookies could get the shaft. The pay scale is also low, starting around $9 an hour in 2011, the BLS reports. But this occupation could be a great springboard into another branch of construction, and some of the time spent working under a master electrician, plumber or carpenter could count toward the practical hours needed in a skilled trades apprenticeship.

The best-paid general construction workers are employed in Massachusetts. The BLS reports that in 2011, workers in Boston, Leominster and Framingham, Mass., made at least $53,000 annually.

10 Jobs That Employers Are Desperate To Fill

By Debra Auerbach

If you're a job seeker, you know how competitive it can be when you're trying to land a job. So it might be surprising to you that some employers are having a tough time finding the right people to fill open positions. In fact, 35 percent of hiring managers currently have positions that have remained unfilled for 12 weeks or longer, according to new research by CareerBuilder. That's because certain occupations often require workers with specialized skills, and there aren't enough workers with those skills to fill the gaps in employment.

"Although the recession created an abundant pool of readily-available, unemployed talent that still exists today, employers are struggling to find new employees for technology-related occupations, sales, health care and a variety of other areas," says Brent Rasmussen, president of CareerBuilder North America. "Two in five employers (41 percent) reported that they continuously recruit throughout the year so that they have candidates in their pipeline in case a position opens up down the road."

In order to help narrow the skills gap that exists for these high-growth, specialized occupations, Rasmussen says that employers need to place a greater emphasis on reskilling workers through formal education and on-the-job training.

CareerBuilder asked employers to identify the hardest-to-fill positions within their organizations that stay open 12 weeks or longer and paired that information with job growth data provided by Economic Modeling Specialists to create a list of occupations that are experiencing strong growth. These jobs present good opportunities for job seekers or those who are open to a career change.

Here's the list, in order of jobs added from 2010 to 2013:

1.Sales representative
Number of jobs added from 2010 to 2013: 584,792*
Percent job growth from 2010 to 2013: 3.8*

2. Machine operator/assembler/production worker
Number of jobs added: 135,363
Percent job growth: 9.9

3. Nurse
Number of jobs added: 135,325
Percent job growth: 5

4. Truck driver
Number of jobs added: 113,517
Percent job growth: 6.7
5. Software developer
Number of jobs added: 103,708
Percent job growth: 11.2

6. Engineer
Number of jobs added: 73,995
Percent job growth: 4.9

7. Marketing professional
Number of jobs added: 57,045
Percent job growth: 11.3

8. Accountant
Number of jobs added: 55,670
Percent job growth: 4.5

9. Mechanic
Number of jobs added: 53,002
Percent job growth: 4.1

10. IT manager/network administrator
Number of jobs added: 48,709
Percent job growth: 7.5

10 jobs that employers find hardest to fill

Young smiling doctor standing in hospital with colleagues talking to patient in backgroundIf you’re a job seeker, you know how competitive it can be when you’re trying to land a job. So it might be surprising to you that some employers are having a tough time finding the right people to fill open positions. In fact, 35 percent of hiring managers currently have positions that have remained unfilled for 12 weeks or longer, according to new research by CareerBuilder. That’s because certain occupations often require workers with specialized skills, and there aren’t enough workers with those skills to fill the gaps in employment.
“Although the recession created an abundant pool of readily-available, unemployed talent that still exists today, employers are struggling to find new employees for technology-related occupations, sales, health care and a variety of other areas,” says Brent Rasmussen, president of CareerBuilder North America. “Two in five employers (41 percent) reported that they continuously recruit throughout the year so that they have candidates in their pipeline in case a position opens up down the road.”
In order to help narrow the skills gap that exists for these high-growth, specialized occupations, Rasmussen says that employers need to place a greater emphasis on reskilling workers through formal education and on-the-job training.
CareerBuilder asked employers to identify the hardest-to-fill positions within their organizations that stay open 12 weeks or longer and paired that information with job growth data provided by Economic Modeling Specialists to create a list of jobs that are experiencing strong job growth. These jobs present good opportunities for job seekers or those who are open to a career change.

Here’s the list, in order of jobs added from 2010 to 2013:
Number of jobs added from 2010 to 2013: 584,792*
Percent job growth from 2010 to 2013: 3.8*
Number of jobs added: 135,363
Percent job growth: 9.9
3. Nurse
Number of jobs added: 135,325
Percent job growth: 5
Number of jobs added: 113,517
Percent job growth: 6.7
Number of jobs added: 103,708
Percent job growth: 11.2
Number of jobs added: 73,995
Percent job growth: 4.9
Number of jobs added: 57,045
Percent job growth: 11.3
Number of jobs added: 55,670
Percent job growth: 4.5
Number of jobs added: 53,002
Percent job growth: 4.1
Number of jobs added: 48,709
Percent job growth: 7.5

The 18 best jobs for 2013 requiring bachelor’s degrees

If the Mayan calendar predictions are wrong and the world continues into 2013, those with bachelor’s degrees will have an extra reason to celebrate the New Year. CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists have released the best bachelor degree jobs for 2013 based on occupations with the most added jobs since 2010, and the list covers a wide variety of industries.
“Where the U.S. will produce the most jobs in 2013 is likely to follow growth patterns of the last few years,” said Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder. “It’s no surprise that technology and engineering occupations comprise six of the top 10 positions on our list, but workers should also see more opportunities in production-related fields, marketing, healthcare and financial services. The competition for educated, specialized labor has intensified as market demands increase in both the manufacturing and services sectors.”


1. Software developer (applications and systems software)70,872 jobs added since 2010, 7 percent growth
Learn more about these jobs: video or infographic.
2. Accountant and auditor37,123 jobs added since 2010, 3 percent growth
3. Market research analyst and marketing specialist31,335 jobs added since 2010, 10 percent growth
Learn more about these jobs: video or infographic.
4. Computer systems analyst26,937 jobs added since 2010, 5 percent growth
5. Human resources, training and labor relations specialist22,773 jobs added since 2010, 5 percent growth
6. Network and computer systems administrator
18,626 jobs added since 2010, 5 percent growth
7. Sales representative (wholesale and manufacturing, technical and scientific)
17,405 jobs added since 2010, 4 percent growth
8. Information security analyst, web developer and computer network architect
15,715 jobs added since 2010, 5 percent growth
9. Mechanical engineer
13,847 jobs added since 2010, 6 percent growth
Learn more about these jobs: video or infographic.
10. Industrial engineer
12,269 jobs added since 2010, 6 percent growth
11. Computer programmer
11,540 jobs added since 2010, 3 percent growth
12. Financial analyst
10,016 jobs added since 2010, 4 percent growth
13. Public relations specialist
8,541 jobs added since 2010, 4 percent growth
14. Logistician
8,522 jobs added since 2010, 8 percent growth
Learn more about these jobs: video or infographic.
15. Database administrator
7,468 jobs added since 2010, 7 percent growth
16. Meeting, convention and event planner
7,072 jobs added since 2010, 10 percent growth
Learn more about these jobs: video or infographic.
17. Cost estimator
6,781 jobs added since 2010, 3 percent growth
18. Personal financial advisor
5,212 jobs added since 2010, 3 percent growth

Steady job growth fueled by temporary and tech hiring

2013 midyear forecast
By Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder
As the latest jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics signaled, there continue to be signs of sustained economic recovery. The U.S. added 195,000 jobs in June, higher than economists’ expectations, and April and May numbers were revised upward by 70,000 jobs. The rise in consumer confidence — which reached a five-year high in June — along with a stronger housing market and increased auto sales — have also helped build up the economy in recent months.
As we look forward to the second half of the year, the overall picture will continue to improve. Businesses are becoming more confident, but economic headwinds still linger, so we can expect job growth to continue its steady pace. According to CareerBuilder’s midyear forecast, 44 percent of employers plan to hire full-time, permanent employees over the next six months, on par with last year. This hiring won’t be limited just to one area; you will see it across regions, industries and businesses of all sizes. Each month we see year-over-year growth in job listings on CareerBuilder.com, another sign that businesses are feeling more confident about expanding their staff.
Temporary and contract hiring remain strong
Coming out of the recession, employers have been trending toward a more flexible workforce, one that allows them to scale up and down quickly as staffing needs arise. This has led to temporary and contract jobs becoming a larger part of the general hiring mix.
According to research from Economic Modeling Specialists Intl., temporary work accounted for 15 percent of all job growth nationally over the last four years, even though the industry makes up roughly 2 percent of the nation’s workforce. In larger markets, the share of job growth since 2009 is much higher — more than 40 percent of new jobs in cities such as Chicago, Philadelphia, Kansas City, Cincinnati and Milwaukee can be attributed to temporary work. What’s more, temporary hiring is happening across industries and job functions. Temporary occupations that are growing at an accelerated rate include registered nurse, computer support specialist and accountant and auditor, to name a few.
Over the next six months, there will be a continued boost in temporary hiring activity. Thirty-one percent of employers plan to hire temporary or contract workers, up from 21 percent last year. As employers become more confident that the economy is stabilizing, they’ll likely turn some of their temporary hires into permanent ones. From our surveys, we find that on average, at least one quarter of employees typically convert temporary workers to full-time, permanent employees. Also, the new health-care law created some uncertainty around obligations to full-time employees, and with the employer mandate being pushed back a year, it may potentially cause more employers to move temporary workers into full-time roles. So while we do see temporary hiring as a trend, we also expect to see permanent hiring picking up as well.
Technology a hot area for hiring
While hiring is increasing across industries, certain sectors are playing a larger role in economic growth. One such area is technology. According to IT analyst firm Foote Partners, IT employment in the first half of 2013 is averaging 13,500 new jobs per month.
CareerBuilder’s midyear survey finds that employers will continue to place an emphasis on roles that involve new technologies. Over the next six months, 16 percent of employers plan to hire for jobs tied to mobile technology, as consumers rely more heavily on their devices for both professional and personal use. Another 15 percent of employers plan to recruit for cloud technology-related jobs, as more companies adopt cloud computing as a way to replace computer products with Web-based services, streamlining the way they do business. Also, technology is being used to help businesses manage and interpret big data, and so 12 percent of employers plan to hire for jobs tied to this area.
Another area that employers predict they’ll staff up for in the back half of the year is cybersecurity, with 9 percent planning to hire for this role. As cyberattacks grow in number, and attackers become more sophisticated, demand for cybersecurity trained professionals will continue to increase.
Positive outlook overall
Because some level of economic uncertainty still exists, businesses will remain conservative with their hiring plans this year and won’t be rushing into a full-scale expansion of headcount. However, the overall pace of hiring is stronger today and will continue on a path of gradual improvement for the remainder of 2013 and could lead us to an even stronger 2014.

Report: These 4 Industries Are Ready To Staff Up

Nearly half of employers surveyed in CareerBuilder's mid-year jobs forecast plan to hire full-time workers.Since the financial crisis, employers have been hesitant to hire full-time employees, often blaming "economic uncertainty," among other problems. But according to CareerBuilder's latest mid-year forecast, that is changing. For the second year in a row, nearly half of 2000 employers surveyed, or 44 percent, said they plan to hire new full-time permanent employees during the final six months of the year. That is a big jump from 2011, when 35 percent said so. (CareerBuilder, which is an AOL Jobs partner, compiled the data from 2,000 hiring managers.)

CareerBuilder does not follow up on its projections. But the rosy outlook didn't entirely come to pass; as CBS Moneywatch reported, by the end of last year, the U.S. economy ended up adding about the same amount of new jobs as it did in 2011. Still, that total number of new jobs added both years was about 1.8 million.


Part-Time Hiring Up
According to this year's survey, a full 25 percent of employers also said they plan to hire part-time workers, a modest increase from last year's total of 21 percent. Hiring of temp workers has surged 7.5 percent in the past year, which is five times more than the overall hiring rate during the same time period. Many economists speculate that employers are opting for temp workers as a way to keep costs down. And they're able to do so because the high unemployment rate has left many Americans willing to accept low-paying jobs with no benefits.

Where To Find Permanent Jobs With Benefits
Four industries, however, stand out as notable exceptions in the CareerBuilder report. Even in an environment in which Americans feel they can only either part-time or low-paying work, these industries are still planning to hire plenty of full-time permanent workers.


4. Professional and Business Services

Companies that plan to hire: 43 percent

Find a job now in professional and business services.

3. Health care

Companies that plan to hire: 51 percent

Find a job now in health care.

2. Information Technology

Companies that plan to hire: 51 percent

Find a job now in information technology.

1. Financial Services

Companies that plan to hire: 52 percent

Find a job now in financial services.

Auto Industry On Hiring Binge

workers on auto industry assembly lineSince its dreariest days, the U.S. auto industry has made an impressive comeback. Now the country is at a tipping point: So many factories are working at capacity that companies are considering expansion, and a big fat hiring binge.

AOL Autos reports that vehicle sales could reach 15.5 million this year, a six-year high, as families finally have the cash to upgrade their 2001 Volvos (the average car on American roads is now a record 11.2 years old). Hiring has been modest so far this year, but The Center for Automotive Research expects the industry to add 35,000 in total through 2013. Right now, there are 14,600 job openings in the auto industry on CareerBuilder alone.

What companies are hiring, and where? What kinds of jobs are available? Read the full story on AOL Autos.

20 companies hiring in July

Enjoying what you do and having a fulfilling career start with finding the right job. To help you begin your search, here are 20 companies hiring in July:

1. Advanced Clinical
Industry:
Clinical research — staffing, functional outsourcing, full service outsourcing
Sample job titles:
SAS programmer, data coding associate, senior database developer, medical director
Location:
Nationwide
2. Amtec
Industry:
Staffing/recruiting
Sample job titles:
Senior systems engineer, computer systems analyst, technical writer, lead mechanical engineer, project manager
Location:
Nationwide
3. Cbeyond
Industry:
IT services
Sample job titles: Senior account executive, tech support, pre-sales engineer, sales consultant, cloud services engineer
Location:
Texas, Georgia, California, Florida, Kentucky
4. Direct Sales Recruiting
Industry:
Sales
Sample job titles: Account executive, sales representative, account manager, area sales manager, regional sales manager, business developer
Location:
Nationwide
5. Echo Global Logistics
Industry:
Third-party logistics
Sample job titles:
.NET developer, account executive, client sales representative, database developer, human resources administrator, HR business partner, operations specialist, sales manager, senior .NET developer, senior quality assurance analyst, transportation sales representative
Location:
Atlanta; Chicago; Dallas; Detroit; Los Angeles; Nashville, Tenn.; Phoenix; Salt Lake City
6. ECS Federal Inc.
Industry: Federal contracting
Sample job titles: Web developer, systems engineer, systems administrator, help desk specialist, budget analyst, financial analyst, environmental policy analyst, business analyst, technical writer, network engineer, quality assurance, program manager, project manager, operations manager
Location: Annapolis and Baltimore, Md.; Chicago; Indianapolis; Los Angeles; Memphis, Tenn.; Orlando, Fla.; Washington, D.C.
7. EVO Payments International
Industry: Sales (credit card/merchant services)
Sample job titles: Sales representative
Location: Nationwide
8. HMSHost
Industry:
Retail/quick-service restaurants
Sample job titles:
Shift supervisor, line cook, shift manager, barista, bartender, server
Location:
Nationwide
9. Jack Henry and Associates
Industry: Banking and information technology
Sample job titles: Software engineering — manager, programmer analyst — advanced, technical support representative
Location: Lenexa, Kan.; Norcross, Ga.; Seattle; Springfield, Mo.
10. loanDepot
Industry:
Mortgage loans
Sample job titles:
Mortgage banker, processing manager, senior mortgage banker, business intelligence engineer, underwriting divisional manager
Location:
Irvine, Calif.; Phoenix; Plano, Texas
11. MDI Group
Industry:
IT
Sample job titles:
.NET developer, senior #/.NET developer, Java developer, SharePoint developer, Oracle DBA, quality assurance analyst, senior mobile application developer, business analyst, project manager
Location: Atlanta; Charlotte, N.C.; Dallas, Austin and Fort Worth, Texas; Greenville, S.C.; Phoenix
12. Molina Healthcare Inc.
Industry: Health care
Sample job titles: Case manager/registered nurse, health plan operation trainer, pharmacy tech, health care analyst, data specialist
Location: California, Florida, Michigan, Missouri, New Mexico, Ohio, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington
13. Moog
Industry:
Aerospace
Sample job titles: 
Senior manufacturing engineer, product engineer, director of operations — commercial aircraft, senior test equipment design engineer
Location:
California, Georgia, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Utah, Virginia
14. Morgan Stanley
Industry:
Finance
Sample job titles: Financial adviser, client services associate, administrative assistant
Location:
Nationwide
15. Park West Gallery
Industry:
Sales
Sample job titles:
Art sales associate, art marketing, auctioneer-in-training
Location:
Nationwide
16. Ross Stores Inc.
Industry: Retail
Sample job titles: Store associate, store manager, store assistant manager, store protection specialist, shortage control, director — corporate communications, allocation analyst, compensation, military relations, middleware engineer, director — real estate
Location: Nationwide
17. Silicon Valley Staffing Group
Industry:
Staffing
Sample job titles: Mortgage underwriter, engineer, general labor — light industrial, administrative/clerical
Location:
Dallas; Phoenix; Sacramento, Fremont and Emeryville, Calif.
18. Titlemax             
Industry: Financial services
Sample job titles: Call center representative, store manager, district manager, general manager, customer service representative, bilingual customer service representative
Location: Nationwide
19. Varsity Tutors
Industry:
Education, teaching, administration
Sample job titles:
Citywide director, tutor, tutor recruiter, IT
Location:
Nationwide
20. Wynn
Industry:
Gaming, entertainment
Sample job titles: Marketing manager, food and beverage, cocktail, security, front desk, bus person, retail associate
Location:
Las Vegas (recruit nationwide)

7 health care companies hiring

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By Jason Lovelace, president of CareerBuilder Healthcare

The health care field was once limited to doctors, nurses and dentists, but it has expanded to include more than 40 different specialties dedicated to wellness, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. And as the health care industry has grown, so has the demand for qualified workers to fill open positions.
While the health care industry as a whole is thriving, 17 roles in health care are projected to grow much faster than average from 2010 to 2020, according to the BLS. Among the fastest-growing roles, home health and personal care aides lead the way with a projected 70 percent growth, followed by physical therapist assistants and aides (45 percent), diagnostic medical sonographers (44 percent) and occupational therapy assistants and aides (41 percent).
These roles require varying levels of education and experience, though recent grads have cause to be optimistic about their employment plans. According to a recent CareerBuilder survey, 56 percent of human resources managers and hiring managers in health care plan to hire recent graduates this year.
Whether you’re beginning your career or you’re a seasoned worker, view the list below of seven health care companies hiring workers right now:
1. Ascension Health Ministry Service CenterHealth care focus: Shared service, support
Sample job titles: Contact center specialist, asset management accountant, Family and Medical Leave Act specialist, HR shared services administrator, business technology specialist, project manager
Location: Indianapolis, Ind.
2. Genesis Healthcare SystemsHealth care focus: Skilled nursing, long-term care, home health, rehabilitation
Sample job titles: Physical therapist, occupational therapist, certified nursing assistant, licensed practical nurse, registered nurse
Location: Nationwide
3. HCR ManorCareHealth care focus: Post-acute rehab, home health and hospice
Sample job titles: Registered nurse, nurse manager, administrator, director of nursing, physical therapist, occupational therapist
Location: Nationwide
4. Our Lady of Lourdes Memorial HospitalHealth care focus: Hospital
Sample job titles: RN staff, nurse practitioner, physician therapist, occupational therapist
Location: Binghamton, N.Y.
5. SpecialtyCareHealth care focus: Health services
Sample job titles: Clinical technician, sterile processing, physician assistant
Location: Nashville, Tenn.; Fort Worth, Texas; Louisville, Ky.; St. Petersburg, Fla.; Sacramento, Calif.
6. Veritas Home HealthHealth care focus: Home health
Sample job titles: Registered nurse, physical therapist, occupational therapist, account manager
Location: Dallas and Plano, Texas
7. Watermark Retirement CommunitiesHealth care focus: Long-term care/skilled nursing facility
Sample job titles: Registered nurse, community life (activities) assistant, licensed practical nurse, human resources director
Location: Nationwide

6 transportation jobs that can move your career

Mechanics at workCars, trains, trucks, planes and boats: they’re the vehicles that move us and our economy, driving the market forward and delivering products and goods to consumers. As the economy continues to recover, more workers are needed to keep transportation and delivery needs met and moving. And in an industry that’s projected to grow 7.2 percent within the next five years, according to Economic Modeling Specialists International and Supply & Demand 2013 data, transportation workers are in high demand.
There were over 4 million jobs in transportation and logistics in 2012, and there is currently one driver for every five opportunities, according to EMSI and Supply & Demand 2013 data. In an industry that’s thriving and calls for more workers, how can you sort through the options and find work that will move your career in the right direction?
The answer may be in one site: JobsInMotion.com. Powered by CareerBuilder, this niche site solely focuses on jobs in the transportation and logistics industry, offering job seekers customized results that fit their career goals and matches them with employers who are just as serious about the industry.
However, if you’re new to the industry or are looking to get experience, this could be the right field for you. Most roles require a high school diploma or equivalent, as well as special licensing or certifications for some occupations. But this industry also offers hands-on training and apprenticeships, and can be a great option for veterans, who are twice as likely as non-vets to work in transportation, according to EMSI and Supply & Demand 2013 data.
Whether you’re returning to a civilian life, looking for a new job or are interested in taking the next step to move your career in the right direction, consider any of these top job postings on JobsInMotion.com:
Automotive service technicians and mechanics* inspect, maintain and repair cars and light trucks.
Job outlook, 2010-20: 17 percent growth
Entry-level education: High school diploma or equivalent
2010 median annual pay: $35,790
Delivery drivers pick up, transport and drop off packages within a small region or urban area. Most of the time, they transport merchandise from a distribution center to businesses and households.
Job outlook, 2010-20: 13 percent growth
Entry-level education: High school diploma or equivalent
2010 median annual pay: $27,050
Diesel service technicians and mechanics inspect, repair or overhaul buses, trucks and anything else with a diesel engine.
Job outlook, 2010-20: 15 percent growth
Entry-level education: High school diploma or equivalent
2010 median annual pay: $40,850
Heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers transport goods from one location to another. Most tractor-trailer drivers are long-haul drivers and operate trucks with a capacity of at least 26,001 pounds per gross vehicle weight. They deliver goods over intercity routes, sometimes spanning several states.
Job outlook, 2010-20: 21 percent growth
Entry-level education: High school diploma or equivalent
2010 median annual pay: $37,770
Machinists set up and operate a variety of computer-controlled or mechanically-controlled machine tools to produce precision metal parts, instruments, and tools.
Job outlook, 2010-20: 7 percent growth
Entry-level education: High school diploma or equivalent
2010 median annual pay: $39,910
Material handlers transport objects without using machines. Some workers move freight, stock or other materials around storage facilities; others clean vehicles; some pick up unwanted household goods and still others pack materials for moving.
Job outlook, 2010-20: 14 percent growth
Entry-level education: Less than high school
2010 median annual pay: $22,560

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