Turning eating into earning: 10 jobs for foodies

For those who don't just eat to live but live to eat, here are 10 jobs where a passion for food is a prerequisite for success:

1. Baker: Bakers work in grocery stores, restaurants, manufacturing facilities and individual bakeries producing everything from fresh bread to custom wedding cakes. Many workers hone their skills through on-the-job training; others opt for formal culinary classes. The median annual wage for the field is $23,450, but pastry chefs commonly earn double this amount. Good news: The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects increased opportunities for highly skilled bakers because of growing demand for specialty products. (Thank you, Buddy "Cake Boss" Valastro.)

2. Chef: Wolfgang Puck rakes in $16 million a year, but the mean annual wage for chefs and head cooks is a more modest $44,780. In addition to creating dishes that keep diners coming back, restaurant chefs often perform managerial tasks such as ordering supplies and hiring staff. Grocery stores, nursing homes, schools and hospitals also employ chefs. Personal chefs may be self-employed or work as part of a team hired to prepare meals in private homes.

3. Food service manager: Part businessman, part foodie, a food service manager oversees the daily operations of a restaurant or other eating establishment. He coordinates activities between the kitchen and dining area, keeps track of schedules and inventory, arranges facility maintenance and deals with customer satisfaction. The middle 50 percent of food service managers earn between $36,670 and $59,580, and employers are increasingly looking for candidates with two- or four-year degrees.

4. Catering director: Creating memorable dining for a client's event is the heart of a caterer's career, but it also pays to be well-versed in contracts, budgets and design before attempting to please a bride-to-be. Catering directors deal with everything from menu planning and ordering food to overseeing set-up, service and clean-up. The national average salary for this position is about $49,500.

5. Culinary instructor: In addition to being hired by colleges and specialized schools for their culinary arts, restaurant management and hospitality programs, foodies interested in teaching can become high school home economics teachers or offer enrichment classes through adult education programs, libraries and stores (think "The Art of Choosing Wine" or "Preparing an Italian Feast"). Salary depends on skill, teaching load and type of institution and can range from about $45,000 to $76,000. Enrichment instructors tend to be paid per class and earn roughly $17.00 per hour.

6. Reviewer: Guy Fieri might have what foodies consider the ultimate job -- circling the nation looking for outstanding eats on "Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives" -- but other opportunities exist to inform fellow enthusiasts about great culinary experiences. Newspapers, magazines, travel guides, television stations and websites employ people to critique restaurants, find local hot spots and discuss food trends. Full-time wages for reporters can be upward of $50,000 but vary widely by the size and prestige of the outlet, with some employers contracting on a per-piece or per-word basis.

7. Travel guide: From cooking-class vacations in Europe to vineyard hopping in California, there is a growing demand for leisure pursuits involving unique food and beverage experiences. Travel guides escort individuals or groups on tours through places of interest. They may also plan, organize and promote the adventures. Median hourly wage is about $15.

8. Sales representative: Passion for what you're selling can go a long way towards convincing businesses to stock or use a product. Through trade shows, conventions, cold calls and conversations with existing clients, sales representatives employed by food companies may entice a gourmet shop to carry their line of chocolates, introduce grocery store managers to a new flavor of salsa or get a restaurant to serve their brand of coffee. Median annual wage is about $48,000 (salary and commission).

9. Dietician: With a background in food and nutrition, dieticians work in hospitals and other settings to improve patient health through what they eat. Dieticians commonly provide input on losing weight, managing an illness and developing healthier eating habits. Some oversee a facility's food service department. Dieticians hold a bachelor's degree or higher, and licensure requirements vary by state. Increasing public interest in nutrition and the aging of baby boomers may make the demand for dieticians increase over the next decade. Median annual income is about $50,600.

10. Food scientist: From developing ways to make chips crispier to extending the shelf life of canned soup, food scientists use their knowledge of chemistry, biology and other sciences to create and improve food products. Common employers include food processing industries, universities and the government. A bachelor's degree or higher is required. The median annual wage in the field is about $59,500.






Source: careerbuilder

America's Lowest Paying Jobs

You've heard the clichés: Money doesn't buy happiness, you should do what you love, blah, blah, blah. But survey after survey show that pay is the No. 1 motivating factor for work.

It's a fact of life that not all jobs are going to pay six figures and have a million benefits. Like teachers and firefighters, many jobs that are essential to our day-to-day lifestyles don't pay a hefty salary.

We've identified the 25 lowest-paying jobs in America, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The pros: Most of the jobs in this list offer on-the-job training, need no experience and have little to no educational requirements. The cons: Did we mention the pay?

A lower-paying, entry-level job can help you to build up your résumé, test-drive different industries and carve a path for success. Consider Janice L. Fields. Fields started her career with McDonald's in 1978 as a crew member; today she's executive vice president and chief operations officer for McDonald's USA.

Yes, the road to the top is often a long one and it takes hard work, but it is possible to achieve large amounts of success with a very simple start. Consider one of these jobs that could be your ticket to professional glory.

Combined food preparation and serving workers, including fast food                  
Average hourly earnings: $7.66            
Average annual earnings: $15,930

Cooks, fast food
Average hourly earnings: $7.67
Average annual earnings: $15,960

Dishwashers
Average hourly earnings: $7.78            
Average annual earnings: $16,190

Dining room and cafeteria attendants and bartender helpers
Average hourly earnings: $7.84            
Average annual earnings: $16,320

Hosts and hostesses, restaurant, lounge and coffee shop
Average hourly earnings: $8.10            
Average annual earnings: $16,860

Counter attendants, cafeteria, food concession and coffee shop
Average hourly earnings: $8.15            
Average annual earnings: $16,950

Gaming dealers                  
Average hourly earnings: $8.18            
Average annual earnings: $17,010

Shampooers
Average hourly earnings: $8.20            
Average annual earnings: $17,050

Waiters and waitresses                
Average hourly earnings: $8.27            
Average annual earnings: $17,190

Ushers, lobby attendants, and ticket takers           
Average hourly earnings: $8.41            
Average annual earnings: $17,500

Amusement and recreation attendants                  
Average hourly earnings: $8.43            
Average annual earnings: $17,530

Farmworkers and laborers, crop, nursery, and greenhouse        
Average hourly earnings: $8.48            
Average annual earnings: $17,630

Cashiers                  
Average hourly earnings: $8.62            
Average annual earnings: $17,930

Personal and home care aides
Average hourly earnings: $8.74            
Average annual earnings: $18,180

Lifeguards, ski patrol, and other recreational protective service workers                  
Average hourly earnings: $8.85      
Average annual earnings: $18,410

Parking lot attendants
Average hourly earnings: $8.87           
Average annual earnings: $18,450

Food preparation workers             
Average hourly earnings: $8.88           
Average annual earnings: $18,480

Pressers, textile, garment, and related materials
Average hourly earnings: $8.88            
Average annual earnings: $18,470

Bartenders            
Average hourly earnings: $8.91            
Average annual earnings: $18,540

Graders and sorters, agricultural productsAverage hourly earnings: $8.95            
Average annual earnings: $18,610

Cooks, short order            
Average hourly earnings: $8.99            
Average annual earnings: $18,710

Maids and housekeeping cleaners     
Average hourly earnings: $8.99            
Average annual earnings: $18,700

Child care workers            
Average hourly earnings: $9.05            
Average annual earnings: $18,820

Laundry and dry-cleaning workers        
Average hourly earnings: $9.08               
Average annual earnings: $18,890

Service station attendants             
Average hourly earnings: $9.21            
Average annual earnings: $19,150
 
 
 
 
 

Source: careerbuilder

5 fields hiring the most 2012 bachelor's-degree grads


A college major gives a student direction and builds a foundation of knowledge for his future career. Yet it doesn't always define what field he'll work in post-college. For instance, a journalism major may end up working as a communications director in the health-care industry, or a business major one day may run an art gallery.
As the economy continues to improve, certain fields are bouncing back more quickly than others. Students whose majors give them the flexibility to work in different sectors should pay attention to those that are hiring new college graduates. According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers' January 2013 Salary Survey, the following five sectors reported the highest number of new graduates with bachelor's degrees entering the field:
1. Educational services: This sector includes schools, colleges, universities and centers that provide instruction and training in a wide variety of subjects.*
Number of new grad entrants: 444,500
Average starting pay: $39,879
Top major hired into the industry: Biological sciences/life sciences
2. Professional, scientific and technical services: These activities require a high degree of expertise and training. Examples of activities performed in this sector include accounting, bookkeeping, payroll services, architecture, engineering and computer services.
Number of new grad entrants: 289,400
Average starting pay: $48,035
Top major hired into the industry: Business administration/management
3. Health care and social assistance: This field comprises establishments providing health care and social assistance for individuals.
Number of new grad entrants: 269,100
Average starting pay: $42,309
Top major hired into the industry: Nursing
4. Federal, state and local government: This sector consists of federal, state and local government agencies that administer, oversee and manage public programs and have executive, legislative or judicial authority over other institutions within a given area. It excludes state and local schools and hospitals and the U.S. Postal Service.
Number of new grad entrants: 191,900
Average starting pay: $44,863
Top major hired into the industry: Criminal justice and corrections
5. Finance and insurance: This sector includes establishments primarily engaged in conducting or facilitating financial transactions, involving the creation, liquidation or change in ownership of financial assets.
Number of new grad entrants: 96,700
Average starting pay: $52,741
Top major hired into the industry: Business administration/management






Source: careerbuilder

A spotlight on engineering jobs



STEM jobs, short for science, technology, engineering and mathematics, are receiving a lot of attention lately, and for good reason. These roles have helped rebuild the economy and keep America at the forefront of modern technology.

While any of these jobs could make a great career, engineering positions deserve a deeper look, with architectural and engineering occupations accounting for 34 percent of overall STEM employment according to research from Kelly Services.

The education and skills needed for engineering jobs
While a bachelor's degree in engineering is required for most entry-level jobs, some research positions may require a graduate degree. Engineers must stay current with their education to keep up with advancements in technologies that support their ability to design and build new products. Soft skills such as communication, leadership and interpersonal skills are becoming increasingly important for engineers to possess.
Once trained, it's possible for engineering workers to transfer their knowledge from one branch of engineering to another. This flexibility allows engineers to move into specialties as their interests change or to those with brighter employment prospects.

Opportunity markets
These eight metropolitan areas are the top spots for engineering jobs. With a strong concentration and a sizeable volume of engineering jobs compared to total employment, these areas are predicted to grow their engineering employment by more than six percent in the next five years.
  • Baltimore
  • Dallas
  • Houston
  • Huntsville, Ala.
  • Kansas City, Kan.
  • Sacramento
  • Virginia Beach, Va.
  • Washington, D.C.
Average wages
Engineers are well compensated for their hard work. The average salary in 2011 for architecture and engineering jobs was $77,120. The average starting salary in 2011 for petroleum engineers was $80,849, the highest for any major.

Expected job growth through 2020
As the U.S. economy continues to recover, the need for engineering jobs is growing. The demand for architecture and engineering workers is expected to add more than 268,000 new jobs to the U.S. workforce. Architecture engineering occupations are expected to grow 10.3 percent by 2020.

The top three specialty engineering jobs by growth percentage through 2020:

1. Biomedical engineer
Growth through 2020: 62 percent
Average salary in 2011: $88,360
2. Environmental engineer
Growth through 2020: 22 percent
Average salary in 2011: $83,340
3. Civil engineer
Growth through 2020: 19 percent
Average salary in 2011: $82,710





Source: careerbuilder

The Most Popular Jobs In America: Map

America is often thought of as a rainbow quilt because of diversity of races, religions and cultures. But it has another kind of diversity: job markets. Not only are some regions prospering and others stewing in misery, but people in different places want different jobs.

AOL Jobs plugged different job-search terms into Google Trends, which lets you see the most popular search terms on Google, by region. We narrowed it to the last 12 months, which gives us a glimpse of the most popular jobs coast to coast. Take a look; you might be surprised to see the states that have the most aspiring actors, wannabe fast food servers, or yoga instructors in training.

1. Factory Jobs: The Rust Belt still shines for factory jobs. Searches for "factory jobs" remain high in Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania compared to the rest of the country. Kentucky is also booming, as manufacturing in this country has shifted south-east in the hunt for cheaper labor. The entire American South is now ahead of New York, which was once upon a time a major foundry of the nation.

2. Oil Field Jobs: North Dakota has indeed gone boom. New technologies have tapped the oil-soaked Bakken shale formation like never before, and state residents are giddily Googling to get a piece of the action. Montana's oil boom is less buzzed about but is clearly also piquing the interest of the state's population. And Texas, well, is Texas.
 
3. Fast Food Jobs: It's not that shocking that those in the South and Midwest are the most interested in fast food jobs. But if you compare it with a map of obesity, there is something curious. The states with some of the lowest obesity rates in the region, like Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, Ohio and Virginia, are the ones most interested in fast food jobs. On the flipside, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Arkansas are at the upper end of the obesity scale, but are the least interested. Texas and Missouri, however, rank high for both.

4. Yoga Jobs: Oregon, Colorado and Massachusetts are the most popular places to greet the sun. For money.

5. Acting Jobs: There are more aspiring actors, it seems, in New Jersey, than California and New York, and more in Georgia than anywhere. It turns out that Georgia has the fourth largest film industry in the U.S. Who knew? Probably a lot of people.

6. Chef Jobs: The aspiring chefs of this nation are hiding out in Florida and Connecticut. It is unclear why. But it does make sense that the Eastern Seaboard lights up for professional cooking, since that's where most of the country's best culinary schools are. Or maybe there's just something in the water, drifting over from the Continent.

7. Stripper Jobs: Texas, New York, and California win handily.







Source: AOL

13 Health Care Companies Hiring Now

Millions of baby boomers are beginning to retire, leaving vacant positions in the workforce and also requiring more medical attention in the coming decades. This growing demand has helped the health care industry weather the economy better than many other industries, and as a result it has a strong future for workers.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that the U.S. will add 5.6 million health care positions between 2010 and 2020. Supporting that estimate is a recent CareerBuilder survey, which found that 22 percent of health care hiring managers plan to add full-time, permanent health care employees in 2013.

Yet, the same survey found that 23 percent of health care employers have open positions for which they've been unable to find qualified applicants. Although demand is quickly rising and possibly outpacing the education and training of job seekers, many qualified workers may be unaware that jobs in health care extend beyond the roles of physicians, surgeons and nurses -- though those positions certainly are in demand. Workers with skills in marketing, engineering and business are also important to helping a health care organization run.

To help you locate a job in this in-demand field, we've put together a list of 13 health care companies hiring workers right now:


1. Almost Family Inc.
  • Health care focus: Home health (geriatric)
  • Sample job titles: Home care director/administrator, clinical manager, physical therapist, occupational therapist, speech therapist, PTA, COTA, registered nurse, licensed practical nurse, home health aide, account executive, patient care liaison, home care rep.
  • Location: Alabama, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania

2. American Cancer Society
  • Health care focus: Oncology
  • Sample job titles: Network engineer, community manager (fundraising)
  • Location: Nationwide

3. BAYADA Home Health Care
  • Health care focus: Home health
  • Sample job titles: Clinical manager, RN, LPN, HHA, CNA, client services manager
  • Location: Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, Connecticut, Vermont, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Arizona, Colorado, California, Hawaii

4. BrightStar Care
  • Health care focus: Home health care/medical and nonmedical services
  • Sample job titles: Home health aide, licensed practical nurse, registered nurse, sales/marketing manager
  • Location: Nationwide

5. Covenant Healthcare
  • Health care focus: Hospital
  • Sample job titles: Therapist, pharmacist, nurse
  • Location: Saginaw, Mich.

6. CRC Health
  • Health care focus: Specialized behavioral health
  • Sample job titles: Counselor, case manager, regional director, nurse
  • Location: Nationwide

7. The Evangelical Lutheran Good Samaritan Society
  • Health care focus: Long-term care, home health, services at home and other community-based services
  • Sample job titles: Certified nursing assistant, registered nurse, licensed practical nurse, director of nursing services, director of home care
  • Location: Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, North Dakota, Colorado, Hawaii, Arizona, New Mexico, South Dakota

8. Extendicare
  • Health care focus: Long-term care facilities
  • Sample job titles: MDS nurse, STNA, CNA, director of nursing, assistant director of nursing, cook, dietary aide
  • Location: Delaware, Idaho, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin

9. IASIS Healthcare
  • Health care focus: Acute care hospitals and behavioral health hospital
  • Sample job titles: ICU nurse, telemetry nurse, labor and delivery nurse, director of case management, director of surgical services
  • Location: Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Louisiana, Nevada, Texas, Utah

10. Infinity Rehab
  • Health care focus: Senior rehabilitation services
  • Sample job titles: Outpatient physical therapist, inpatient physical therapist, occupational therapist, speech language pathologist
  • Location: Oregon, Idaho, Colorado, Alaska

11. UHS – Universal Health System Inc.
  • Health care focus: Behavioral health facilities, acute care hospitals and ambulatory centers
  • Sample job titles: Nursing, physician, corporate, allied health, executive, behavioral health
  • Location: Nationwide

12. US Healthworks
  • Health care focus: Urgent care
  • Sample job titles: Physician, physical therapist, director of compliance
  • Location: Nationwide

13. Steward Health Care System
  • Health care focus: Hospital
  • Sample job titles: Allied health, nursing, nurse leadership/administration
  • Location: Massachusetts

Source: AOL

Fastest-Growing Jobs In America

We live in a technology-driven society, always awaiting the next big technology breakthrough. We wait in line for the newest phone, only to do it all over again once the next version debuts. A flat-screen TV is nice, but one equipped with 3-D technology is even better.

This thirst for the newest, most innovative technologies isn't likely to be quenched anytime soon, ensuring that the need for workers in the technology field will continue to grow. According to workforce and staffing solutions company Kelly Services, U.S. computer-related or technology occupations are expected to grow at a much stronger rate (21.8 percent) than overall employment (14.3 percent) through 2020. These occupations make up 49 percent of overall STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) employment, and STEM jobs are seen as essential to a growing economy and vital to the nation's competitiveness.

If you want to know which IT jobs are growing, what they pay and the skills they require, here's a closer look*:

The Fastest-Growing IT Jobs
Demand for these workers is being driven by the increased need for businesses, government and other organizations to design, adopt and leverage the latest technologies. Yet some IT occupations are growing at a faster pace than others. The five fastest-growing IT jobs through 2020 include:

1. Software developer, systems software
  • Percent growth: 32.4.
  • 2011 average annual salary: $100,420.

2. Database administrator
  • Percent growth: 30.6.
  • 2011 average annual salary: $77,350.

3. Network and computer systems administrator
  • Percent growth: 27.8.
  • 2011 average annual salary: $74,270.

4. Software developer, applications
  • Percent growth: 27.6.
  • 2011 average annual salary: $92,080.

5. Computer systems analyst.
  • Percent growth: 22.1.
  • 2011 average annual salary: $82,320.

Markets With The Most Opportunity
Technology jobs can be found in virtually every U.S. market, and given the nature of the work, many roles may allow for telecommuting. However, certain U.S. markets have a strong concentration and a substantial volume of IT jobs compared to total employment. The following 10 metropolitan areas are expected to grow their IT employment by more than 8 percent in the next five years:
  • Atlanta
  • Austin, Texas
  • Baltimore
  • Boston
  • Columbus, Ohio
  • Dallas
  • San Francisco
  • San Jose, Calif.
  • Seattle
  • Washington, D.C.


The Starting Salaries To Expect
If you're just starting college, you're not sure of your major, and you've always had an interest in technology, consider pursuing a computer-related degree. Not only is this area growing, but many occupations offer impressive salaries to boot. In fact, two out of the top five starting salaries for all majors went to computer grads. Computer engineering majors earn an average starting salary of $64,499, while computer science majors can expect $63,402.

The Skills Needed To Excel
Workers interested in pursuing an IT or computer-related job should possess strong problem-solving, analytical and communication skills. Yet employers are also looking for individuals who want to push the boundaries of technology by using their imagination and creativity. Given what already has been discovered, who knows what the next generation of IT innovators will create next.





Source: AOL

Top 5 Industries For New College Grads


home care nurse A college major gives a student direction and builds a foundation of knowledge for his future career. Yet it doesn't always define what industry he'll work in post-college. For instance, a journalism major may end up working as a communications director in the health-care industry, or a business major one day may run an art gallery.

As the economy continues to improve, certain industries are bouncing back more quickly than others. Students whose majors give them the flexibility to work in different industries should pay attention to industries that are hiring, especially those that are hiring new college graduates. According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers' January 2013 Salary Survey, certain industries are hiring more 2012 bachelor's degree grads than others.

Below are the top five industries that reported the highest number of new graduate entrants for 2012 bachelor's degree grads, along with the number of new entrants, the average starting pay for those workers and the top major that's being hired into the industry.

1. Educational services: This sector includes establishments, such as schools, colleges, universities and training centers, which provide instruction and training in a wide variety of subjects.*
  • Number of new grad entrants: 444,500
  • Average starting pay: $39,879
  • Top major hired into the industry: Biological sciences/life sciences

2. Professional, scientific and technical services: These activities require a high degree of expertise and training. Examples of activities performed in this sector include accounting, bookkeeping, payroll services, architectural, engineering and computer services.
  • Number of new grad entrants: 289,400
  • Average starting pay: $48,035
  • Top major hired into the industry: Business administration/management

3. Health care and social assistance: This industry comprises establishments providing health care and social assistance for individuals. It includes both health care and social assistance, because it is sometimes difficult to distinguish between the boundaries of these activities.
  • Number of new grad entrants: 269,100
  • Average starting pay: $42,309
  • Top major hired into the industry: Nursing

4. Federal, state and local government: This sector consists of establishments of federal, state and local government agencies that administer, oversee and manage public programs and have executive, legislative or judicial authority over other institutions within a given area. It excludes state and local schools and hospitals and the U.S. postal service.
  • Number of new grad entrants: 191,900
  • Average starting pay: $44,863
  • Top major hired into the industry: Criminal justice and corrections

5. Finance and insurance: This industry includes establishments primarily engaged in financial transactions -- transactions involving the creation, liquidation or change in ownership of financial assets -- and/or in facilitating financial transactions.
  • Number of new grad entrants: 96,700
  • Average starting pay: $52,741
  • Top major hired into the industry: Business administration/management





Source: AOL

5 Good Health Care Jobs That Require Only A Bachelor's Degree


health care jobs, bachelor's degree

Getting a good job in health care doesn't necessarily require a doctoral degree. It's possible to help people feel their best and care for their health with a bachelor's degree. A bachelor's degree can help you form a solid career in health care or take you to the next step in pursuing a postgraduate degree. Consider the following health care jobs that require only a bachelor's degree.

1. Athletic trainer*

What they do: Athletic trainers specialize in preventing, diagnosing and treating muscle and bone injuries and disorders. They work with people of all ages and skill levels, including children, soldiers and professional athletes. Athletic trainers need at least a bachelor's degree, although both bachelor's and master's degrees are common. In most states, athletic trainers need a license or certification.

Projected job growth: Employment is expected to grow by 30 percent between 2010 and 2020, much faster than the average for all occupations. As people become more aware of sports-related injuries in children, demand for athletic trainers is expected to increase, most significantly in schools and youth sports leagues.

Median annual pay: $41,600



2. Dietitian and nutritionist

What they do: Dietitians and nutritionists are experts in food and nutrition. They advise people on what to eat in order to lead a healthy lifestyle or achieve a specific health-related goal. Although all dietitians and nutritionists do similar tasks, there are several types, including clinical dietitians, management dietitians and community dietitians. Most dietitians and nutritionists have a bachelor's degree and have participated in supervised training. Also, many states require dietitians and nutritionists to be licensed.

Projected job growth: Employment is expected to increase by 20 percent between 2010 and 2020, faster than the average for all occupations.

Median annual pay: $53,250


3. Medical and clinical laboratory technologist and technician

What they do: Medical laboratory technologists -- also known as medical laboratory scientists -- and medical laboratory technicians collect samples and perform tests to analyze body fluids, tissue and other substances. Educational requirements for technologists and technicians differ. Technologists typically need a bachelor's degree; technicians usually need an associate degree or a postsecondary certificate. Some states require technologists and technicians to be licensed or registered.

Projected job growth: Employment of technologists is expected to grow by 11 percent between 2010 and 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Employment of technicians is expected to grow by 15 percent between 2010 and 2020, about as fast as average.

Median annual pay: Medical laboratory technologists: $56,130; medical laboratory technicians: $36,280



4. Occupational health and safety specialist

What they do: Occupational health and safety specialists analyze work environments and procedures. They inspect workplaces for adherence to regulations on safety, health and the environment. They also design programs to prevent disease or injury to workers and damage to the environment. Occupational health and safety specialists typically need a bachelor's degree. All specialists are trained in the specific laws or inspection procedures through a combination of classroom and on-the-job training.

Projected job growth: Employment is expected to grow by 9 percent between 2010 and 2020, which is slower than average.

Median annual pay: $64,660


5. Recreational therapist

What they do: Recreational therapists plan, direct and coordinate recreation programs for people with disabilities or illnesses. They use a variety of techniques, including arts and crafts, drama, music, dance, sports, games and field trips. These programs help maintain or improve a client's physical and emotional well-being. Recreational therapists typically need a bachelor's degree. Most employers require therapists to be certified by the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation.

Projected job growth: Employment is expected to grow by 17 percent, about as fast as average. As baby-boomers age, they will need recreational therapists to help treat age-related injuries and illnesses, such as strokes.

Median annual pay: $39,410
 
 
 
 

Source: AOL

6 jobs that will stress you out (but are still worth it)

Every job comes with some amount of stress. Even people who say they love their job still have days when something goes wrong and their blood pressure rises several digits. Let's face it -- if something is called work, it's going to include some stress.   
There are certain jobs that universally are known for their high-stress work environments -- military personnel, police officers, fire fighters and doctors to name a few. Then there are those jobs that on the surface may not seem as demanding, but are in fact filled with stressful experiences. Here are six of those jobs, the reasons why they made the list and why they're still worth pursuing.

1. Editor
Why it will stress you out: According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of editors is expected to experience little or no change from 2010 to 2020. As online media grow and traditional newsrooms continue to shrink, editors will deal with more pressure and increasing workloads. Plus, working under tight deadlines and being responsible for the accuracy of published content can be stressful.
Why it's worth it: Some people flourish when working under pressure. Plus, as a journalist, and someone who appreciates the written word, it's gratifying to publish work that is read and enjoyed by the public. If you're able to adapt to online media and are comfortable using digital tools, you'll have an advantage in the competitive job market.
Average annual pay: $60,490

2. Event coordinator
Why it will stress you out: While it may seem like a glamorous job, the role of event coordinator can be highly stressful. You're responsible for handling the logistics and execution of events for clients -- some of who may be difficult to work with or demanding. If anything goes wrong, it's on your shoulders. No wonder it made CareerCast's list of the 10 most stressful jobs of 2012.
Why it's worth it: No two days are the same, and you're not constricted to a cubicle. Plus, it's exciting to see someone's vision come to life and fulfilling to receive kudos from happy clients.
Average annual pay: $49,840

3. Public-relations manager
Why it will stress you out: As a PR manager, it's your job to get your client or company in the news, which sometimes means dealing with reporters who aren't interested in what you have to say. Also, as a company spokesperson, you are responsible for representing the company, which can be stressful. When the company is faced with a crisis, you're the one who has to put out the fire.
Why it's worth it: If you work at an agency, you may have a variety of clients, which can keep things interesting. You often get to flex your creative muscles when planning new campaigns or programs to get publicity for a client. And if you enjoy public speaking and like thinking on your feet, you'll find the job exciting.
Average annual pay: $105,690

4. Real-estate sales agent
Why it will stress you out: The volatile economy has made the job of real-estate agent more stressful. You have clients with unrealistic expectations of what their home price should be, and having to sell a home for more than it's worth can be a challenge. You may also devote time and energy to helping clients find a new home, only for them to back out on the sale. And working on commission means you rely on those sales for a paycheck.
Why it's worth it: According to the National Association of Realtors, total home sales in 2012 were the highest they've been in five years, and they predict that sales will continue on an upward trend. Also, it's a great job for people who don't want to sit at a desk all day.
Average annual pay: $51,170

5. High-school teacher
Why it will stress you out: According to a 2011 CareerBuilder survey, high-school teachers were named among the most frightening professions. And no wonder -- dealing with hormone-raging teenagers can be scary. Also, some teachers deal with large class sizes and financial strain, which can make their jobs more difficult. They're also held accountable for students' academic performances and may encounter disrespectful students or unhappy parents.
Why it's worth it: It may be one of the most stressful jobs out there, but it's also one of the most rewarding. There's no better feeling than teaching students new skills and seeing them grow and succeed.
Average annual pay: $56,760

6. Veterinarian
Why it will stress you out: As the BLS notes, "Veterinarians' work can sometimes be emotionally stressful as they deal with sick animals and the animals' anxious owners. Also, the workplace can be noisy as the animals make noise when sick or being handled." Basically, working with sick animals can take a toll on you.
Why it's worth it: Job prospects are good; according to the BLS, employment of veterinarians is expected to grow 36 percent from 2010 to 2020, much faster than the average for all occupations. Plus, if you love animals, you get to have a direct hand in helping them.
Average annual pay: $91,250






Source: AOL

Second careers for the 40-plus crowd


You're too young for retirement, too experienced for entry-level positions and too fed up with your job to stay any longer. Have you considered starting a second career? Starting over in a new field can be an exciting way to change how you feel about your work life, and the shifting economy offers more opportunities for change than you might think.
Here are some ideas for getting started on a career change, and where to look.
Create an "open ideas" list
If you're ready to leave your first career behind, it's time to ask what's next. Keep a running list of ideas for your future -- hobbies you enjoy, your areas of expertise, business ideas you passed on previously, childhood dreams. This list can include every pipe dream you've ever had. Then, narrow it down to what interests you most, what you can make happen and what you want to learn more about. Try out different fields by volunteering, taking classes and talking to those who have the position you want. Transitioning successfully to a second career depends on how much research and preparation you can do to ensure this will be the right fit.
Use your economic advantages
Making a career switch can be intimidating at any point in life, but a tepid economy and family responsibilities can hinder even the biggest risk-takers. Rather than starting off on your own, take advantage of jobs that have been newly created or for which demand is growing. CareerBuilder's midyear job forecast shared hopeful news for job seekers and career changers. More employers are reporting that within their organization, new jobs are emerging that didn't exist five years ago, including positions tied to:
  • Social media
  • Storing and managing data
  • Cybersecurity
  • Financial regulation
  • Promoting diversity inside and outside the organization
  • "Green" energy and the environment
  • Global relations
Employers are hiring in large numbers in some areas, including those that affect revenue and innovation. If you're looking to get some new experience before launching an independent career, here are some areas where employers are hiring first:
  • Customer service
  • Information technology
  • Sales
  • Administrative
  • Business development
  • Accounting/finance
  • Marketing
Consider secure jobs
Still not convinced a second career is in your future? "150 Best Jobs for a Secure Future" author Laurence Shatkin, Ph.D., shares a variety of secure-job lists based on different demographics. Switching careers during economic uncertainty is actually more common and practical than it may seem. "People tend to lose recession-sensitive jobs when economic downturns strike, and the jobs they find during those hard times tend to be available because they're secure," Shatkin says.

Here are seven of the best secure jobs with a high percentage of mature workers:
1. Athletic trainers*
Percent growth between 2010-20: 30 percent (much faster than average)
Median annual pay: $41,600
2. Clinical, counseling and other school psychologists
Percent growth between 2010-20: 22 percent (faster than average)
Median annual pay: $68,640
3. Instructional coordinators
Percent growth between 2010-20: 20 percent (faster than average)
Median annual pay: $58,830
4. Interpreters and translators
Percent growth between 2010-20: 42 percent (much faster than average)
Median annual pay: $43,300
5. Management analysts
Percent growth between 2010-20: 22 percent (faster than average)
Median annual pay: $78,160
6. Occupational therapy assistants
Percent growth between 2010-20: 33 percent (much faster than average)
Median annual pay: $72,320
7. Technical writers
Percent growth between 2010-20: 17 percent (about as fast as average)
Median annual pay: $68,280




Source careerbuilder

6 Jobs For Bilingual Workers

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, more than half of the total U.S. population growth between 2000 and 2010 was due to the increase in the Hispanic population. From 1980-2007, the percentage of people in the U.S. whose first language is other than English grew by 140 percent, while the nation's overall population grew by 34 percent.

If this segment of the population continues to grow, the bilingual workforce will need to grow with it. Bilingual employees have long been in demand in education and sales, but now virtually all job sectors --– including retirement, marketing and health care -- –need bilingual workers. Here are six examples of jobs for bilingual workers:


1. Bank teller: As a bank teller, you handle monetary transactions for customers of all languages using different currencies. You're also responsible for educating customers about their financial options, so the ability to effectively communicate with non-English speakers is a big advantage.
  • Median annual pay: $24,100*

2. Customer service representative: Customer service representatives help people find information or solve problems. Bilingual reps are attractive to employers because speaking multiple languages allows you to do your job more efficiently and help a larger group of customers.
  • Median annual pay: $30,460

3. Marketing/advertising/promotions manager: According to Ad Age, U.S. Hispanic media spending continues to grow faster than general market media every year, up 4.6 percent in 2011, compared with 1.1 percent for all U.S. media. According to a 2012 report from the Association of National Advertisers, 88 percent of U.S. marketers say that they are targeting Hispanic customers via digital media platforms. As more marketing resources are devoted to reaching the Hispanic population, the demand for Spanish-speaking marketers will only grow.
  • Median annual pay: $108,260

4. Police/detective: According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, police and detective jobs in state and federal agencies are more competitive than positions in local departments. They'll continue to remain that way, since they often offer high pay and more promotion and transfer opportunities. The BLS notes that bilingual job seekers with a bachelor's degree, and with law enforcement or military experience, should have the best opportunities in federal agencies.
  • Median annual pay: $55,010

5. Human-resources specialist: By 2020, Latinos are expected to comprise 19 percent of the U.S. workforce, according to the Labor Department. To help with multicultural recruitment needs, more companies are hiring bilingual recruiters and human-resources professionals to help find qualified candidates and assist them with their employment transitions.
  • Median annual pay: $52,690

6. Social worker: Social workers often deal with sensitive situations, including substance abuse, mental illness and child care. Therefore, the fewer language barriers there are between the workers and their clients, the smoother and more effective the interactions will be.
  • Median annual pay: $42,480





Source: AOL

10 In-Demand Jobs That Pay Six Figures

six figure jobs Many people would love to find a six-figure career. But in this tepid labor market, many high-wage earners, including even attorneys, are finding that jobs remain elusive. Still, Glassdoor reports there are careers with plenty of job openings that offer handsome salaries.
The employment website recently compiled a list of 10 careers with six-figure potential that are in high demand, basing its findings on job titles with hundreds of job listings and at least 50 salary reports shared by employees on Glassdoor's site.
All of the jobs require at least a bachelor's degree and some may require several years of work experience to achieve the pay shown here. What's more, the jobs listed below represent a variety of fields -- from finance to medicine to technology.
So, if you (or your children) are preparing to spend thousands of dollars on tuition, here are jobs -- spanning a variety of fields -- from finance to medicine to technology -- that offer high income and opportunities.


10. Lead Software Engineer:
  • Average base salary: $100,585.
  • Entry-level education: Bachelor's degree.
  • Forecast job growth (through 2020): 30 percent (much faster than average).

Find Lead Software Engineer Jobs.


9. IT Manager:
  • Average base salary: $101,244.
  • Entry-level education: Bachelor's degree.
  • Forecast job growth: 18 percent (average).

Find IT Manager Jobs.


8. Product Marketing Manager:
  • Average base salary: $103,633.
  • Entry-level education: Bachelor's degree.
  • Forecast job growth: 14 percent (average).

Find Product Marketing Manager Jobs.


7. Tax Manager:
  • Average base salary: $104,093.
  • Entry-level education: Bachelor's degree.
  • Forecast job growth: 9 percent (slower than average).

Find Tax Manager Jobs.


6. Pharmacist:
  • Average base salary: $107,490.
  • Entry-level education: Doctor of pharmacy degree.
  • Forecast job growth: 9 percent (slower than average).

Find Pharmacist Jobs.


5. Engineering Manager:
  • Average base salary: $117,552.
  • Entry-level education: Bachelor's degree.
  • Forecast job growth: 9 percent (slower than average).

Find Engineering Manager Jobs.


4. Sales Director:
  • Average base salary: $119,758.
  • Entry-level education: Bachelor's degree.
  • Forecast job growth: 12 percent (average).

Find Sales Director Jobs.


3. Dentist:
  • Average base salary: $126,134.
  • Entry-level education: Doctor of dental surgery degree.
  • Forecast job growth: 21 percent (faster than average).

Find Dentists Jobs.


2. Physician:
  • Average base salary: $152,768.
  • Entry-level education: Degree as a medical doctor or doctor of osteopathic medicine.
  • Forecast job growth: 24 percent (faster than average).

Find Physician Jobs.


1. Psychiatrist:
  • Average base salary: $169,479.
  • Entry-level education: Medical doctor degree.
  • Forecast job growth: 24 percent (faster than average).

Find Psychiatrist Jobs.






Source: AOL

15 Companies Staffing Up In February

companies hiring in February


If your New Year's resolution was to get a new job, hopefully by now you've kicked your job search into high gear. Here's a list of 15 companies that are hiring now. Click on the links below to learn more about the opportunities available at each company:


1. ABB
  • Industry: Engineering/energy/utilities.
  • Sample job titles: Project manager, business development manager, financial analyst, human-resources associate, payroll accountant, senior field service technician, technical center manager, control systems engineer, international sales engineer, field service engineer.
  • Location: Nationwide.
2. All Medical Personnel
  • Industry: Staffing (health care).
  • Sample job titles: Bilingual registered nurse, bilingual licensed practical nurse, claims adjuster, certified phlebotomist, occupational therapist, phlebotomist.
  • Location: Hollywood, Fla.; Fayetteville, N.C.; Fresno, Calif.; Irving, Texas.

3. American Air Liquide
  • Industry: Oil and gas.
  • Sample job titles: Business development account manager, water treatment engineer, process engineering associate.
  • Location: Nationwide.
4. Brightstar Corporation
  • Industry: Telecommunications.
  • Sample job titles: Master data administrator, administrative assistant, retail analyst.
  • Location: Miami; Libertyville, Ill.
5. Brookdale Senior Living
  • Industry: Senior living and health services.
  • Sample job titles: Executive director, home health, nursing, sales and marketing, resident care, dining services, therapy services.
  • Location: Colorado, Florida, Michigan, Ohio, Tennessee, Texas, Wisconsin.
6. Clayton Homes
  • Industry: Sales.
  • Sample job titles: Sales professional, manager in training.
  • Location: Nationwide.

7. IHG
  • Industry: Hospitality.
  • Sample job titles: Purchasing/procurement, wait staff, chef, brand manager.
  • Location: California, Texas, Florida, Washington, D.C., Georgia, New York.
8. Insight Global Inc.
  • Industry: Information technology.
  • Sample job titles: Entry-level account manager, Java developer, .Net developer, C# developer.
  • Location: Nationwide.
9. Nemours
  • Industry: Health care (children's hospital).
  • Sample job titles: Registered nurse, physical therapist, medical technologist, speech therapist.
  • Location: Wilmington, Del.; Orlando, Jacksonville and Pensacola, Fla.; New Jersey; Pennsylvania.
10. Saia LTL Freight
  • Industry: Transportation/logistics.
  • Sample job titles: Dockworker, driver, customer service rep., mechanic, sales representative, operations clerk.
  • Location: Nationwide.

11. Service Corporation International
  • Industry: Funeral/cemetery.
  • Sample job titles: Sales professional, outside sales executive.
  • Location: Nationwide.
12. SpecialtyCare
  • Industry: Health care.
  • Sample job titles: Clinical technician, sterile processing, physician assistant.
  • Location: Nashville; Fort Worth, Texas; Louisville, Ky.; Saint Petersburg, Fla.; Sacramento.
13. Transamerica
  • Industry: Insurance and finance.
  • Sample job titles: Insurance agent, district manager, systems analyst, sales manager.
  • Location: Miami, Dallas/Fort Worth, Cedar Rapids, Baltimore.
14. UniTek Global Services
  • Industry: Outsourced infrastructure services.
  • Sample job titles: Alarm installer, cable installer, warehouse manager, tower technician, project manager, QA technician, satellite TV installer.
  • Location: Nationwide.
15. Vidant Medical Center
  • Industry: Health care.
  • Sample job titles: Registered nurse, staff nurse, systems engineer, supervisor information services, solutions architect.
  • Location: Greenville, Kenansville, Avon, Durham, Raleigh, Rocky Mount and Wilson, N.C.





Source: AOL

Deferring Retirement? Best Part-Time Gigs for Baby Boomers

At a time when the majority of men and women expect to work beyond their retirement, many baby boomers will use this time to shift gears in their careers. In fact, 80 percent of today’s 76 million baby boomers plan to keep working in the future and more than half of them are interested in pursuing new careers, according to a Merrill Lynch survey.

When it comes to seeking a new career or continuing to work for the same employer, many boomers will opt for part-time employment. This option is particularly appealing for boomers who want flexibility in their schedules or cannot find full-time employment.

 “A part-time job can keep you physically, mentally and socially active and perhaps allow you to experiment with a new work role without the commitment and energy drain of a 40-hour workweek,” says Laurence Shatkin, Ph.D., co-author of “225 Best Jobs for Baby Boomers” (JIST © 2007).

Working part-time is also a great solution for boomers who want to retire, but can’t because they’re financially unprepared to leave the work force.

“For the first time since you were a teenager, part-time work may be financially feasible even though you will be paid for fewer hours and probably at a lower hourly rate,” Shatkin says. “Social Security, a pension, a 401(k) or some combination of these may cover a major fraction of your income needs. Plus, Medicare or a retirement medical plan may provide health-care benefits that previously had been affordable only through a full-time job.”

The following are 20 of the best jobs for baby boomers working part-time, based on information from the U.S. Department of Labor.

Teachers, Post-secondaryAnnual Earnings: $54,406
Annual Openings: 216,000

Registered Nurses
Annual Earnings: $53,640
Annual Openings: 215,000

Pharmacists
Annual Earnings: $87,160
Annual Openings: 23,000

Clinical Psychologists*
Annual Earnings: $56,360
Annual Openings: 17,000

Counseling Psychologists*
Annual Earnings: $56,360
Annual Openings: 17,000

School Psychologists*
Annual Earnings: $56,360
Annual Openings: 17,000

Instructional Coordinators
Annual Earnings: $50,060
Annual Openings: 18,000

Security Guards
Annual Earnings: $20,520
Annual Openings: 228,000

Self-Enrichment Education TeachersAnnual Earnings: $31,530
Annual Openings: 39,000

Speech Language PathologistsAnnual Earnings: $53,790
Annual Openings: 10,000

Truck Drivers, Light or Delivery ServicesAnnual Earnings: $24,420
Annual Openings: 219,000

Personal and Home Care AidesAnnual Earnings: $17,020
Annual Openings: 154,000

Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational NursesAnnual Earnings: $34,650
Annual Openings: 105,000

Medical and Clinical Laboratory TechnologistsAnnual Earnings: $46,710
Annual Openings: 21,000

Teacher AssistantsAnnual Earnings: $19,760
Annual Openings: 259,000

Legal SecretariesAnnual Earnings: $37,390
Annual Openings: 39,000

Chiropractors
Annual Earnings: $67,940
Annual Openings: 3,000

Audiologists
Annual Earnings: $53,040
Annual Openings: 1,000

Janitors and Cleaners, Except for Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners
Annual Earnings: $19,110
Annual Openings: 454,000

Caption Writers
Annual Earnings: $45,460
Annual Openings: 23,000




Source: careerbuilder

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