8 jobs in social media


Most people try to stay off of social-media websites such as Facebook or Twitter while working, knowing that if their boss catches them, they'll get lectured about putting more time and effort into their work. But what if your job required you to be on Facebook, interacting with friends and getting paid for having the most retweets?
You're in luck: This workplace daydream is a career reality. Demand for social-media jobs is growing as more companies want to join the social-media community. "The world's dependency on technology, the pervasiveness of social media and the need to drive sales and expand into new markets are all driving double-digit growth across a variety of fields," says Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder. The Bureau of Labor Statistics' 2010-20 projections show the same, stating, "The growth of social media will result in the need for more workers to maintain an organization's public image."


Here are eight jobs that either directly relate to or involve social media:

1. Advertising, promotions and marketing manager: Advertising, promotions and marketing managers plan programs to generate interest in a product or service. They work with art directors, sales agents and financial staff members. According to the BLS, "Advertising and promotions managers will be needed to plan, direct and coordinate advertising and promotion campaigns, as well as to introduce new products to the marketplace. They will also be needed to manage digital media campaigns, which often target customers through the use of websites, social media and live chats."
Pay: According to the BLS, the median annual pay for advertising, promotions and marketing managers is $108,260.

2. Blogger: According to The Creative Group's guide for social-media job descriptions, bloggers are "responsible for opinionated, stylish writing and frequently posting new content to the Internet. Duties may also include developing and/or revising text for other venues, including online communities, press releases, Web articles and video blogs."
Pay: The median annual pay for bloggers is $55,420, according to the BLS.

3. Community manager: "Community managers create and execute social-media strategies designed to accomplish real business objectives for brands," says Katherine Leonard, digital-content developer at lonelybrand, a digital marketing agency in Chicago.
Pay: According to social-media education company Social Fresh, the average annual pay for a community manager is $61,800.

4. Content-marketing manager: "I spend my days writing and promoting business blogs, e-books and white papers," says Jasmine Henry, content-marketing manager for Inbound Marketing Agents in Nashville, Tenn. "No blog does well in a bubble, so being able to parse pithy quotes and pick topics that are going to inspire shares and retweets on major social-media channels is critical to our clients' success. I typically spend a great deal of time watching conversations on Twitter to figure out which topics are driving conversations, writing blog articles about these topics and then responding to questions and retweets."
Pay: According to CBSalary.com, the national average salary for content-marketing managers is $56,752.

5. Meeting, convention and event planner: Meeting, convention and event planners coordinate all aspects of professional meetings and events. They choose locations, arrange transportation and coordinate other details. The BLS states that "planners must be familiar with computers, database software, budgets and online social media."
Pay: According to the BLS, the median annual pay for this role is $45,260.

6. Public-relations manager and specialist: PR managers and specialists create and maintain a favorable public image for their employer or client. They write material for media releases, plan and direct PR programs and raise money for their organizations. "Growth of both will be driven by the need for organizations to maintain their public image in a high-information age and with the growth of social media," notes the BLS.
Pay: According to the BLS, the median annual pay for PR managers and specialists is $57,550.

7. Social-networking analyst: "A good portion of time is spent engaging with customers and acquiring new followers and fans," says Giselle Gonzales, social-media analyst at Sandbox Industries, a venture capital firm in Chicago. "We also scour the Web finding content that is most relevant to our follower base and will help us get a good conversation started."
Pay: According to CBSalary.com, the national average salary is $82,020.

8. Social-media manager: "Social-media managers are responsible for deciding what content to feature on our social-media channels, including Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn," says Jodey Smith, Web and social-media manager for SeaVentures Inc. in Alpharetta, Ga. "Daily tasks include posting, responding to community discussions and combating spam. Ongoing testing and various strategies and techniques make up a large part of the day."
Pay: According to CBSalary.com, the national average salary for social-media managers is $106,160.





Source: careerbuilder

10 Fastest-Growing Industries For Jobs

There is no shortage of industries hard hit by the recent recession, which resulted in millions of Americans losing jobs. But with the economy making a comeback, some industries are now showing robust growth, according to a new report released this week.

The study, prepared by Economic Modeling Specialists Intl. and CareerBuilder, an AOL Jobs sponsor, notes 10 industries where job growth has increased by double digits the past two years.

Heavily represented in these fast-growing fields are the energy and health-care sectors, but so are manufacturing, technology, logistics and a trio of occupations that employ many freelance as well as salaried workers.

Overall, job creation is on "an upward trajectory," CareerBuilders says, though some areas are experiencing slow or stagnant growth, according to the report, which includes data for employees as well as self-employed workers, culled from more than 90 national and state employment resources.

The following is a list of fast-growing industries where job growth has increased by double digits -- with an addition of at least 20,000 jobs from 2010 to 2012 -- according to the report.
  1. Internet Publishing and Broadcasting and Web Search Portals -- 28,333 jobs added since 2010, up 30 percent.
  2. Drilling Oil and Gas Wells -- 21,970 jobs added, up 29 percent.
  3. Electronic Shopping -- 25,327 jobs added, up 23 percent.
  4. Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Extraction -- 32,715 jobs added, up 21 percent.
  5. Temporary Help Services -- 438,116 jobs added, up 21 percent.
  6. Machine Shops -- 44,754 jobs added, up 18 percent.
  7. Marketing Consulting Services -- 27,113 jobs added, up 13 percent.
  8. Computer Systems Design Services -- 88,740 jobs added, up 12 percent.
  9. Specialized Freight (except used goods) Trucking, Local -- 22,936 jobs added, up 11 percent.
  10. Home Health Care Services -- 116,360 jobs added, up 10 percent.




Source: AOL

Best Seasonal Jobs for Older Workers

holiday jobs for retirees


As the holiday shopping season approaches, retailers hire more seasonal employees to keep up with the crowds. It's not just the traditional sales cashier positions that are in demand; possible holiday jobs include everything from Santa Claus impersonator to home holiday decorator or product demonstrator.

Retirees and older workers who are looking for part-time work that keeps them occupied or to help make ends meet, and their flexibility during the holidays makes them an asset for retailers.

"Employers are also looking to hire someone who is responsible and reliable -- two attributes an older worker has in their quiver," says Kerry Hannon, author of Great Jobs for Everyone 50+: Finding Work That Keeps You Happy and Healthy ... And Pays the Bills.

The holidays are a perfect opportunity for job-seekers, and "forecasts for holiday hiring are looking stronger than last year," Hannon adds.

Here are 10 holiday jobs that Hannon recommends for retirees, arranged generally from maximum earning potential to the lowest.


1. Santa Claus

Median pay range: From $10 an hour to thousands of dollars per season. Contract pay for the 40-day season can range from around $10,000 for a rookie to more than $50,000 for a more experienced player, depending on the mall and location.

Qualifications: It helps if you look the part -- older, plump, a white beard and a jovial laugh. Santas can be of any race, depending on the venue, but they must be male. (There are some openings for Mrs. Santas and Santa's helpers, too.) Having a natural beard is often a prerequisite, but you can dye it if necessary and padding can be tucked in to get that jelly belly. Expect a criminal background check and drug screening.

Job-hunting tips: Contact smaller malls, department stores, photo shops and special event party planners directly for openings.

Check local classified ads. National staffing services typically provide Santa impersonators to the larger malls. Three of the bigger ones: Cherry Hill Photo Enterprises, Worldwide Photography and Noerr Programs. You'll need to apply online and go for an in-person interview. If they like your look and attitude, you'll slip into costume and makeup for headshots, which are sent to the mall reps for selection.

If you're picked, the service will negotiate your contract and send you to Santa school for tips on appropriate behavior and conversations, suggestions for calming kids and makeup help. Don't forget your flu shot.


2. Call Center Representative

The hours: Many call centers are open extended hours or staffed around the clock. Peak times may not last for a full shift, so you may be slotted for part time or work a split shift.

Median pay range: Median hourly wages of customer service representatives range from less than $9.15 to more than $23.24.

Qualifications: Listening and verbal skills are key. For workers who correspond through email, good typing, spelling and grammar skills are essential. Basic to intermediate computer knowledge is vital. You'll likely be given training with background on the company and its products, the most commonly asked questions you'll face and a review of the computer and telephone systems you'll be using. Hint: Companies favor folks who have a pleasant, neutral speaking voice.


3. Product Demonstrator

The hours: Vary by store. During holiday crunch times, evenings and weekends are the norm.

Median pay range: $8.28 to $21.19 per hour.

Qualifications: On-the-job training to glean sales techniques is standard fare. Smooth public speaking and communication skills and an outgoing personality will serve you well. This is a performance in many ways, so you'll want to channel your inner entertainer. Humor and friendly chit-chat attracts customers.

Past jobs in retail, sales or customer service make it easier, but any volunteering or public speaking experience is worth noting on your resume.

Job-hunting tips: If you know a shop or even a big-box store near you that uses demonstrators, stop by and ask if the store does the hiring directly. If so, put in your application.

You might also ask an in-store demonstrator during a break how he or she got the job. Some companies pay a kickback for bringing in a new worker. If the store uses an outside agency, get the contact information. If you're interested in a specific product, go to the company website to check for openings and apply online. Kiosk operators in malls sometimes hire part-time product demo help. Pump it up.


4. Retail Sales Representative

The hours: During holiday crunch time, plan on working evenings and weekends.

Median pay range: Pay can range from less than $7.37 to more than $19.14 an hour, though bonus pay is possible.

Qualifications: Previous sales experience helps, but it's not a deal-breaker. Greenhorns can apply. Expect on-the-job training by a more experienced employee. This can be on the fly at this frenzied time of year. Don't be shy about asking questions. In department stores, training programs are more formal. Topics often include customer service, security, store policies and procedures, and cash register operation. Insider knowledge helps. If you're hawking computers, a sense of the technical distinctions between products is vital. People skills are a must. Employers might run a background or credit score check on you to make sure you're trustworthy.

Best arrows to have tucked in your quiver: patience and persuasion.


5. Holiday Decorator

The hours: Potentially long and variable, but brief stints. November to early January. Some late-night and weekend work can be required for installation and dismantling.

Median pay range: $8.14 to $17.23 per hour.

Qualifications: Past holiday decorating experience is a plus. Floral designer training helps. If you've got a flair for this type of work, a good attitude, and you're willing to learn, many florists and decorators will gladly train you as you go.

Many vocational schools and community colleges award certificates and degrees in floral design. You'll learn the basics of arranging flowers, including the different types of flowers, their color and texture, cutting and taping techniques, tying bows and ribbons, and proper handling and care of flowers. The American Institute of Floral Designers offers an accreditation examination.

Job-hunting tips: Check with local florists and floral departments at grocery stores and event-planning firms for openings.

If you're confident in your own decorating panache, you might opt to start your own business. You can land clients through word of mouth and ask friends and family to help spread the word. For starters, decorate the homes or offices of a few friends or family members gratis or at a bargain price. You'll be able to build up a portfolio or website with display pictures to show potential clients.


6. Bartending/Waiting Tables/Catering

The hours: Flexible. Nights, weekend and lunchtimes can peak during the weeks before New Year's.

Median pay range: Bartending fetches $7.33 to $15.11 per hour and up, plus tips. Waitstaff is good for $7.54 to $14.41 plus tips. Caterers should expect an hourly range between $9.82 and $11.89, but can run up to $20 an hour plus tips.

Qualifications: A pleasant personality and an ability to banter with customers is essential. Math and memorization skills come in handy too. Experience is helpful, but other positions where you've worked with people (even as a volunteer) are worth noting. Personal and professional references are valuable calling cards.

If you're considering bartending, especially as a post-holiday part-time job, you might enroll in a bartender training school that offers two-week programs.

Catering will require more stove time in the kitchen to earn your culinary chops and references to back up your claims. You could face stiff competition from professional chefs. Expect upfront costs for sample-menu preparation.

Not for the hot and bothered.

Job-hunting tips: Before you apply for waitstaff or bar jobs, do your reconnaissance as a customer to see how staff dress and get a feel for the venue and menu.


7. Shipping Clerk/Package Delivery

For shipping clerk:

The hours: Flexible and partial shifts during the rush season.

Median pay range: The hourly wages run the gamut from $8.50 to $15 an hour, based on experience.

Qualifications: You must be computer literate. Retail experience staffing a cash register helps. A background check is standard for most positions.

For package delivery:

The hours: Full eight-hour shifts to part time, depending on where you live.

Median pay range: $9 to more than $14 an hour; tips and bonuses are possible.

Qualifications: You should be somewhat spry to handle the physical aspects of this job. At UPS and FedEx, there's typically a written test to gauge communication skills that may be called on when you come face-to-face with a customer. And some training is provided.

Job-hunting tips: Check the big delivery company websites for openings.


8. Restaurant Greeter

The hours: Lunch and dinner shifts, generally no more than five hours.

Median pay range: The pay scale is generally $8.25 to $15 an hour, but varies widely by size and popularity of the establishment.

Qualifications: People and organizational skills are prerequisites. Some phone work. Prior time spent at a restaurant is valued. Warmth and a welcoming smile will serve you well.

Your mantra: "Follow me. Your table is ready."


9. Gift Wrapper

The hours: In-store jobs track shopping hours. For distribution center jobs, night shifts apply.

Median pay range: The range is typically $8.60 to around $13 an hour.

Qualifications: The ability to fold and wrap paper so it's taut and neat around a package, plus a knack for deftly twisting ribbon in ways the typical customer can't fathom.

This skill is generally self-taught, but you may be given crash on-the-job training with a few test packages. Some community colleges offer classes for around $25 that teach the "creative art" of gift-wrapping.

Job-hunting tip: Search online job boards for "gift wrapper associate" and stop by or contact the human resource department at nearby stores.


10. Retail Sales Cashier

The hours: Variable. Plan on working evenings and weekends.

Median pay range: Pay can range from $7.15 to more than $12 an hour.

Qualifications: Cashiers need little or no previous experience, although it helps. Training is generally on the go with a more seasoned co-worker. Department and chain stores might offer a short training course to get you up to speed on customer service, security, the store's policies and procedures and cash register operation. Employers generally run a background or credit score check to make sure you can be trusted to handle money. You should be at ease with financial transactions and basic computer commands.







Source: AOL

Seasonal Hiring: Companies Hiring For The Holidays

hiring for holidays seasonal

While snow may not yet be falling and decorations may still be in storage, it's time to start thinking about the holidays. Sure, it might be a little too early to adorn your house with tinsel and lights, but if you're a job seeker, it's not too early to begin your seasonal job search.

Some job seekers slow down their job hunt at the end of the year, but by doing so, they might be missing out on seasonal employment opportunities. Many companies add temporary positions during the holidays, openings that they're starting to fill now.

Seasonal workers are needed across many industries and for a variety of job functions, and the positions have benefits beyond just a paycheck. Judi Perkins, a career coach with 22 years of recruitment experience and founder of Find the Perfect Job, shares some of those advantages:

A holiday job can help fill a resume gap and give you experience that you can reference during an interview.

It's a connection that can prove to be beneficial after the holidays, either immediately or in the future. Take it as an opportunity to make yourself invaluable and build relationships.

You might learn something new. Whether the employer is shorthanded and asks you to undertake a new task, or you volunteer to help with a big project, not only will the company remember you, but you'll have new skills to market to other potential employers.

Another plus to working during the holidays? A seasonal job can become a long-term career, because some companies end up permanently hiring temporary workers. According to CareerBuilder's recent hiring forecast, 23 percent of employers are planning to transition some contract or temporary staff into full-time employees in Q4.


To kick off your holiday job search, here's a list of 16 employers that currently have seasonal openings:

1. AT&T
  • Industry: Telecommunications
  • Sample job title: Retail sales consultant
  • Location: Nationwide

2. Bravo Brio Restaurant Group
  • Industry: Restaurants
  • Sample job titles: Hourly staff, server, assistant manager, general manager, sous chef
  • Location: Nationwide

3. Brooks Brothers
  • Industry: Apparel
  • Sample job titles: Store manager, assistant manager, visual coordinator, key holder
  • Location: Nationwide

4. Coinstar/Redbox
  • Industry: Automated retail
  • Sample job titles: Marketing, information technology, engineering, field support
  • Location: Nationwide

5. David Lerner Associates
  • Industry: Financial investment
  • Sample job titles: Sales, financial adviser
  • Location: Westport, Conn.; Teaneck, N.J.; Princeton, N.J.; Syosset, N.Y.; White Plains, N.Y.

6. Daymon Interactions: Club Demonstration Services
  • Industry: Retail
  • Sample job title: Event manager
  • Location: Nationwide

7. Gold Buyers at the Mall
  • Industry: Retail
  • Sample job titles: Retail sales, general manager, district manager
  • Location: Nationwide

8. J. Crew
  • Industry: Retail/distribution center/fashion
  • Sample job titles: Merchandise processor -- all shifts, customer contact center -- client specialist, loss prevention -- all shifts
  • Location: San Antonio; Lynchburg, Va.; Arden, N.C.

9. Massage Envy
  • Industry: Health and wellness
  • Sample job titles: Sales associate, massage therapist, aesthetician, clinic manager
  • Location: Nationwide

10. One Touch Direct
  • Industry: Customer service/sales
  • Sample job titles: Inside sales/telephone sales representative
  • Location: Tampa

11. Saks Fifth Avenue
  • Industry: Retail
  • Sample job title: Sales associate
  • Location: Nationwide

12. Sterling Jewelers
  • Industry: Retail/jewelry
  • Sample job titles: Full-time sales associate, part-time sales associate
  • Location: Nationwide

13. TeleTech
  • Industry: Customer service/call center
  • Sample job titles: Customer service - work at home
  • Location: Nationwide

14. Toys R Us
  • Industry: Retail
  • Sample job titles: Store manager, sales, stock, assembling (holiday need), receiving specialist, maintenance/housekeeping, pricing and signage team member, HR supervisor
  • Location: Nationwide

15. Wells Fargo
  • Industry: Finance
  • Sample job titles: Personal banker (safe), teller, customer sales and service representative, private banker, consumer loan underwriter
  • Location: Nationwide

16. WMS
  • Industry: Gaming
  • Sample job titles: Information technology, engineering, field service, sales, artist
  • Location: Chicago; Waukegan, Ill.; Atlanta, Ga.



Source: AOL

Jobs That Make The World A Worse Place

worst jobs
Fast food workers. Telemarketers. Investment bankers. These professions have the highest share of employees who say their jobs make the world a worse place, according to a survey by PayScale.

1. Fast Food Worker
Workers who say their job makes the world a worse place: 38.4%

Many fast food workers aren't feeling so good about handing you those greasy burgers and fries. In a survey conducted by PayScale that asked employees, 'Does your job make the world a better place?," 38.4% of fast food workers said their job was actually making the world a worse place.

That's the highest percentage for any of the jobs included in the survey and is well above the average of less than 1% across all jobs.

Why are fast food workers feeling so low? It's likely that some workers feel as if they are contributing to the country's worsening obesity epidemic, said Katie Bardaro, lead economist at PayScale. "A lot of fast food isn't healthy for you, and [fast food workers] are continuing to feed it to people even though they know that it's not," she said.


2. Gaming Dealer
Workers who say their job makes the world a worse place: 17.6%

Watching gamblers throw their money away weighs on the consciences of some casino dealers, whose job often involves dealing the hands for games like poker and blackjack, distributing the winnings and collecting the losers' chips at the end of a game.

"They're supporting peoples' vices," said PayScale's Bardaro. "They may feel they're making the world a worse place by taking money away from people who often can't afford to lose that money."

Nearly 18% of gaming dealers say their job makes the world a worse place and almost half said their job doesn't do anything to make the world a better place.


3. Telemarketer
Workers who say their job makes the world a worse place: 9.4%

Interrupting family dinners with phone calls about products that people often don't need may lead some telemarketers to question the worthiness of their line of work.

More than 9% of telemarketers surveyed by PayScale said they thought their job made the world a worse place -- well above the industry wide average of less than 1%.

"Apart from door-to-door salespeople, telemarketers may be perceived as one of the most annoying sales professions," said Joel Garfinkle, career coach and author of "Getting Ahead: Three Steps to Take Your Career to the Next Level." "They enter your home -- via the telephone -- uninvited."

If you represent or sell a product that you believe actually has value for consumers, however, the job could become more meaningful, he said.


4. TV Newscast Director
Workers who say their job makes the world a worse place: 8.1%

Producing news about natural disasters, mass murders and economic meltdowns can take a toll on some TV newscast directors, who often work in control rooms and make sure everything runs smoothly.

"They're [sometimes] highlighting the bad things in the world because that's what gets the best ratings -- often times stories about things like gossip and violence," said PayScale's Bardaro.


5. Bartender
Workers who say their job makes the world a worse place: 6.7%

Getting people drunk may be fun, but some bartenders don't find it to be the most meaningful career.

"Does alcohol and the related downfalls of alcohol -- including drunk driving and alcoholism -- make the world a better place? For many bartenders, they may think not," said career coach Garfinkle.

But many bartenders actually have more meaningful jobs than they realize, since they can often act as therapist figures for customers who let their guard downs and open up to them, said Garfinkle. "It doesn't always occur to them that that interaction could really make a difference in a person's life."




Source: AOL

7 Jobs For People Who Like To Travel

Traveling can be more than just taking a break for a few days. For those who like to travel, it's about seeing the world and interacting with people from different cultures. Some may enjoy traveling so much that they make it a part of their job. Here are seven occupations for people who like to travel:

1. Airline and commercial pilot*

What they do: Airline and commercial pilots fly and navigate airplanes or helicopters. Pilots spend a considerable amount of time away from home, because flights often involve overnight layovers.

Typical education level that most workers need to enter this occupation: Many pilots learn to fly in the military, but a growing number have an associate or bachelor's degree from a civilian flight school. All pilots who are paid to transport passengers or cargo must have a commercial pilot's license.

2010 median pay: $92,060.


2. Anthropologist and archaeologist

What they do: Anthropologists and archeologists study the origin, development and behavior of human beings, past and present. They examine the cultures, languages, archaeological remains and physical characteristics of people in various parts of the world. Although some anthropologists and archaeologists work in an office, many work in laboratories or travel occasionally for fieldwork.

Typical education level: Master's degree.

2010 median pay: $54,230.


3. Geographer

What they do: Geographers study the Earth and its land, features and inhabitants. They research the physical or human geographic characteristics of a region, ranging in scale from local to global. Most geographers work for the federal government. Some travel to foreign countries or remote locations for fieldwork.

Typical education level: Bachelor's degree.

2010 median pay: $72,800.


4. Heavy and tractor-trailer truck driver

What they do: Heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers transport goods to and from locations. They deliver goods over intercity routes, sometimes spanning several states. Long-haul truck drivers can be away from home for days or weeks at a time and spend much of their time alone.

Typical education level: High-school diploma or equivalent.

2010 median pay: $37,770.


5. Meeting, convention and event planner

What they do: Meeting, convention and event planners coordinate all aspects of professional meetings and events, such as choosing meeting locations and arranging transportation. They work onsite at hotels or convention centers, and they often travel to attend events and visit prospective meeting sites.

Typical education level: Bachelor's degree.

2010 median pay: $45,260.


6. Reporter, correspondent and broadcast news analyst

What they do: Reporters, correspondents and broadcast news analysts inform the public about news and events happening locally, nationally and internationally. They work for newspapers, magazines, websites, television and radio. Reporters and correspondents spend a lot of time in the field, conducting interviews and investigating stories.

Typical education level: Bachelor's degree.

2010 median pay: $36,000.


7. Train engineer and operator

What they do: Train engineers and operators ensure that freight and passenger trains stay on schedule and travel safely. Train engineers drive trains, while train operators work the brakes, signals or switches. Locomotive engineers drive trains between stations, and rail-yard engineers move trains around in a rail yard.

Typical education level: High-school diploma or equivalent.

2010 median pay: $46,100.









Source: AOL

10 Recession-Proof Jobs



While nobody's job is 100 percent secure, plenty of jobs and industries  are somewhat resilient. For boosted job security, Shatkin suggests looking for work not only in a recession-resistant occupation, but also within a recession-resistant industry.


If you're looking for a new job, focus your efforts on the following areas and you might increase your odds of landing a great position.

1. Registered nurse
Resistant reason:
Nurses are always in demand, recession or not. People will continue to get sick and seek medical attention no matter what the state of the economy, which ought to give RNs sound job security.
Training needed: A bachelor's or associate degree in nursing, plus completion of an approved nursing program. RNs must also complete a national licensing examination to obtain a nursing license. Further training or education qualifies nurses to work in specialty areas.
Growth through 2016*: 23.5 percent
Salary**: $46,242

2. Public relations specialist
Resistant reason:
As advertising budgets are sliced and other marketing efforts are nixed to cut costs, many companies will rely solely on their public relations departments to promote the company brand. Additionally, as rumors spread about layoffs, bailouts and bankruptcy, PR specialists are needed more than ever to put out these fires along the way.
Training needed: A college degree in a communications-related field like journalism or advertising is helpful, though not necessary. If you lack a degree, employers will look for demonstrated communication skills.
Growth through 2016: 18 percent
Salary: $41,549

3. Teacher, post-secondaryResistant reason: Since it's becoming harder to score a job, people are riding out the recession by going back to school. Furthermore, workers and job seekers alike are earning higher education to increase their marketability in the work force. 
Training needed: Training varies based on the subject you teach and where you teach it. Four-year colleges and universities, however, usually require candidates to hold a doctoral degree for full-time, tenure-track positions.
Growth through 2016: 23 percent
Salary: $46,991

4. Police officer
Resistant reason:
First, police officers are employed by the government, which definitely doesn't hurt job security. Second, the sad fact is that crime happens every day and the economy isn't helping. Desperate times call for desperate measures, which for some people include stealing and other offenses -- in some areas, police officers are busier than ever.
Training needed: Law enforcement agencies encourage applicants to take courses or training related to law enforcement subjects after high school. Candidates must be U.S. citizens, usually at least 20 years old, and must meet rigorous physical and personal qualifications.
Growth through 2016: 11 percent
Salary: $49,288

5. Insurance sales agent
Resistant reason:
Though many Americans are on a tight budget, people are generally willing to spend money on the big stuff, such as coverage for natural disasters, health-care expenses and automobile accidents. With so many people losing their jobs -- leaving them uninsured as a result -- insurance sales agents have a larger client pool to work with.
Training needed: You have to have a state license to sell insurance; requirements vary by state, but generally require insurance-related course work and passing several exams. A college degree is not required, but is strongly encouraged.
Growth through 2016: 13 percent
Salary: $39,656

6. Pharmacy technician
Resistant reason:
As the population ages, people probably will need more medication, as do the many people suffering from depression and anxiety as a result of the recession. Plus, many people have health-care coverage of some kind, even with the downturn, which makes it possible for people to continue to pay for medications.
Training needed: Most are trained on the job, but employers prefer applicants who have formal training, certification or previous experience.
Growth through 2016: 32 percent
Salary: $28,624

7. Funeral director
Resistant reason:
Death is a fact of life. No matter what the economy does, people will continue to pass away and families will continue to grieve while seeking assistance to plan services for their loved ones.
Training needed: Every state requires that funeral directors are licensed. State licensing laws vary, but most require you to be 21 years old, have two years of formal education, serve a one-year apprenticeship and pass an examination.
Growth through 2016: 12 percent
Salary: $87,383

8. Environmental science technician
Resistant reason:
The Obama administration plans to create 5 million "green" jobs over the next 10 years. Despite a slowing economy, a large percentage of the U.S. work force continues to dedicate itself to the environment.
Training needed: Most environmental science technicians need an associate degree or certificate in applied science or science-related technology. Technicians with a high school diploma and no college degree typically begin work under the direct supervision of an experienced technician and eventually earn a two-year degree in science technology.
Growth through 2016: 28 percent
Salary: $36,655

9. Network systems and data communications analyst
Resistant reason:
Many technology-based positions can be performed by outsourcing, but certain technology workers, such as network systems and data communications analysts, must deal with problems onsite.
Training needed: An associate degree or certificate is sufficient, although more advanced positions might require a computer-related bachelor's degree.
Growth through 2016: 53.4 percent
Salary: $40,827 and $71,637, respectively

10. Fast-food worker
Resistant reason:
Unfortunately, fast food is all some people can afford these days. While so many other companies saw a decrease in sales and income last year, McDonalds, for example, saw global sales increase 6.9 percent throughout 2008, and its operational income increased 14 percent.
Training needed: No previous training is needed for this position; on-the-job training is provided.
Growth through 2016: 17 percent
Salary: $16,568





Source: careerbuilder

Companies hiring for the holidays

16 companies hiring seasonal workers.


While snow may not yet be falling and decorations may still be in storage, it's time to start thinking about the holidays. Sure, it might be a little too early to adorn your house with tinsel and lights, but if you're a job seeker, it's not too early to begin your seasonal job search.

Some job seekers slow down their job hunt at the end of the year, but by doing so, they might be missing out on seasonal employment opportunities. Many companies add temporary positions during the holidays, openings that they're starting to fill now.

Seasonal workers are needed across many industries and for a variety of job functions, and the positions have benefits beyond just a paycheck. Judi Perkins, a career coach with 22 years of recruitment experience and founder of Find the Perfect Job, shares some of those advantages:
  • A holiday job can help fill a résumé a gap and give you experience that you can reference during an interview.
  •  
  • It's a connection that can prove to be beneficial after the holidays, either immediately or in the future. Take it as an opportunity to make yourself invaluable and build relationships.
  •  
  • You might learn something new. Whether the employer is shorthanded and asks you to undertake a new task, or you volunteer to help with a big project, not only will the company remember you, but you'll have new skills to market to other potential employers.   
Another plus to working during the holidays? A seasonal job can become a long-term career, because some companies end up permanently hiring temporary workers. According to CareerBuilder's recent hiring forecast, 23 percent of employers are planning to transition some contract or temporary staff into full-time employees in Q4.

To kick off your holiday job search, here's a list of 16 employers that currently have seasonal openings:

1. AT&T
Industry: Telecommunications
Sample job title: Retail sales consultant
Location: Nationwide
2. Bravo Brio Restaurant Group
Industry: Restaurants
Sample job titles: Hourly staff, server, assistant manager, general manager, sous chef
Location: Nationwide
3. Brooks Brothers
Industry: Apparel
Sample job titles: Store manager, assistant manager, visual coordinator, key holder
Location: Nationwide
4. Coinstar/Redbox
Industry: Automated retail
Sample job titles: Marketing, information technology, engineering, field support
Location: Nationwide
5. David Lerner Associates
Industry: Financial investment
Sample job titles: Sales, financial adviser
Location: Westport, Conn.; Teaneck, N.J.; Princeton, N.J.; Syosset, N.Y.; White Plains, N.Y.
6. Daymon Interactions: Club Demonstration Services
Industry: Retail
Sample job title: Event manager
Location: Nationwide
7. Gold Buyers at the Mall
Industry: Retail
Sample job titles: Retail sales, general manager, district manager
Location: Nationwide
8. J. Crew
Industry: Retail/distribution center/fashion
Sample job titles: Merchandise processor -- all shifts, customer contact center -- client specialist, loss prevention -- all shifts
Location: San Antonio; Lynchburg, Va.; Arden, N.C.
9. Massage Envy
Industry: Health and wellness
Sample job titles: Sales associate, massage therapist, esthetician, clinic manager
Location: Nationwide
10. One Touch Direct
Industry: Customer service/sales
Sample job titles: Inside sales/telephone sales representative
Location: Tampa
11. Saks Fifth Avenue
Industry: Retail
Sample job title: Sales associate
Location: Nationwide
12. Sterling Jewelers
Industry: Retail/jewelry
Sample job titles: Full-time sales associate, part-time sales associate  
Location:
Nationwide
13. TeleTech
Industry: Customer service/call center
Sample job titles: Customer service -- work at home
Location: Nationwide
14. Toys"R"Us
Industry: Retail
Sample job titles: Store manager, sales, stock, assembling (holiday need), receiving specialist, maintenance/housekeeping, pricing and signage team member, HR supervisor
Location: Nationwide
15. Wells Fargo
Industry: Finance
Sample job titles: Personal banker (safe), teller, customer sales and service representative, private banker, consumer loan underwriter
Location: Nationwide
16. WMS
Industry: Gaming
Sample job titles: Information technology, engineering, field service, sales, artist
Location: Chicago; Waukegan, Ill.; Atlanta, Ga.


Source: careerbuilder

20 Good Jobs That Don't Require A College Degree


high school diploma jobs With all the debate surrounding the value of a college degree these days, many young workers and their parents may be glad to hear there are many well paying jobs that don't require higher education.

CareerCast.com recently identified 20 good jobs that need only a high-school diploma, although they do require some additional training. The job-portal didn't rely just on salary to compile its list. It used five sets of criteria to assess the quality of the careers, assigning points to each measure. Those with the lowest overall score achieved the highest rankings and vice versa.


The criteria included such things as how physically demanding a job was (jobs that require frequent and heavy lifting scored less desirably than those with little or none), as well as emotional factors, such as competitiveness, potential hazards and the amount of contact with the public, and stress.

CareerCast also looked at potential for income and employment growth (for the decade ending 2020) and how much mid-level workers earned in their respective fields.

At first blush, some jobs that made CareerCast's list may not appear to be great choices, with starting wages at around $16,000 a year -- only slightly more than minimum wage.

But CareerCast says each of the jobs fares well overall, at least according to its criteria. "If salary is lagging, the other aspects of the job make up for it," says CareerCast.com Publisher Tony Lee.

And it bears mentioning that when compared to jobs in Careercast's overall Jobs Rated rankings, which includes positions that require a college degree, these jobs don't rank as well.

That's one reason career experts aren't so quick to dismiss the value of a college education despite the rapid rise in tuition and other costs in recent years. Though a college degree doesn't guarantee employment, college graduates overall have lower rates of unemployment than those with less education.

Further, statistics routinely show that having a college degree substantially increases earning power -- an average $1 million during a lifetime.

Still, Lee says, "If you want to earn a lot of money without a college degree, take a look at the amount of training you'll need, then focus on a job that can still provide a satisfying, comfortable career."
Check out CareerCast list of 20 Great Jobs Without a College Degree:

1. Dental Hygenist

Average Starting Salary: $45,000
Income Growth: 109 percent
Employment Growth: 37.7 percent

2. Online Sales Manager

Average Starting Salary: $40,000
Income Growth: 255 percent
Employment Growth: 25 percent

3. Web Developer

Average Starting Salary: $43,000
Income Growth: 179 percent
Employment Growth: 21.7 percent

4. Medical Secretary

Average Starting Salary: $21,000
Income Growth: 114 percent
Employment Growth: 41.3 percent

5. Paralegal Assistant

Average Starting Salary: $29,000
Income Growth: 159 percent
Employment Growth: 18.3 percent

6. Stenographer/Court Reporter

Average Starting Salary: $26,000
Income Growth: 250 percent
Employment Growth: 14.1 percent

7. Heating/Refrigeration Mechanic

Average Starting Salary: $26,000
Income Growth: 158 percent
Employment Growth: 33.7 percent

8. Surveyor

Average Starting Salary: $31,000
Income Growth: 190 percent
Employment Growth: 25.4 percent

9. Executive Assistant

Average Starting Salary: $29,000
Income Growth: 131 percent
Employment Growth: 12.6 percent

10. Insurance Agent

Average Starting Salary: $26,000
Income Growth: 342 percent
Employment Growth: 21.9 percent

11. Industrial Machine Repairer

Average Starting Salary: $30,000
Income Growth: 127 percent
Employment Growth: 21.6 percent

12. Cosmetologist

Average Starting Salary: $16,000
Income Growth: 163 percent
Employment Growth: 15.7 percent

13. Hair Stylist

Average Starting Salary: $16,000
Income Growth: 163 percent
Employment Growth: 15.7 percent

14. Tax Examiner/Collector

Average Starting Salary: $30,000
Income Growth: 207 percent
Employment Growth: 7.3 percent

15. Sales Representative (Wholesale)

Average Starting Salary: $27,000
Income Growth: 304 percent
Employment Growth: 15.6 percent
16. Construction Machinery Operator

Average Starting Salary: $26,000
Income Growth: 173 percent
Employment Growth: 23.5 percent

17. Electrical Technician

Average Starting Salary: $34,000
Income Growth: 138 percent
Employment Growth: 1.9 percent

18. Architectural Drafter

Average Starting Salary: $30,000
Income Growth: 140 percent
Employment Growth: 3.2 percent

19. Teacher's Aide

Average Starting Salary: $17,000
Income Growth: 112 percent
Employment Growth: 14.8 percent

20. Sewage Plant Operator

Average Starting Salary: $25,000
Income Growth: 156 percent
Employment Growth: 11.6 percent







Source: AOL

The 6 Best Technology Jobs of 2012

Poised for growth.

Whether the day-to-day tasks involve dissecting the inner-workings of a Mac or designing applications to be loaded onto a personal digital assistant, all of our Best Technology Jobs provide impressive salaries, high job satisfaction, and sound job prospects.

 

Software Developer

Writing code and designing or customizing computer applications are just some of the tasks of a software developer. These professionals top this year’s list of Best Technology Jobs, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts a 27.6 percent employment growth for their profession by 2020.

Database Administrator

DBAs create security measures that secure company data and also ensure that office databases run efficiently. This occupation is on track for 30.6 percent employment growth in the next decade.

Web Developer

Web developers spend the bulk of their days designing and maintaining websites. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts a 21.7 percent employment increase for Web development over the next 10 years.

Computer Systems Analyst

Computer systems analysts configure hardware and software, as well as design and develop computer systems. Their occupation is expected to grow 22.1 percent by 2020, the BLS projects.

Computer Programmer

Many computer programmers rely on languages like C ++ and Python to write software applications. The BLS reports that these professionals earned a median annual wage of $71,380 in 2010.

Civil Engineer

Civil engineers snagged the final slot on our roster of the Best Technology Jobs. They raked in an impressive median salary of $77,560 in 2010.

 

 

 

Source: money.usnews

The Best Jobs of 2012

The year's hottest jobs are hiring in droves, paying well, and providing room to grow...

 Jobs from quick-to-hire industries made our list: business, creative services, healthcare, science & technology, and social services. John Challenger, CEO of the outplacement company Challenger, Gray & Christmas predicts many of these sectors will overlap, with one industry standing the tallest. "Healthcare has become the core industry in this country, just like manufacturing in another era," he says. "It's a confluence of forces causing this, including the science involved in uncovering new frontiers, the aging of the population, and government's commitment to providing healthcare to a broader generation of people. That causes job growth in several sectors."

 Here's a summary of the rest of our top 10 jobs...

10. Occupational Therapist 

Salary Range: $48,920-$102,520
The term "occupational therapist" is purposely vague, because the purview for which these highly trained professionals could provide therapy is exhaustive. Patients with mental, physical, developmental, and emotional disabilities might see an occupational therapist to learn to function independently. There is no "typical" day, and therapists' specific—yet varied—skills will particularly be in demand as a large chunk of our population ages. This is one of fastest growing occupations this decade, but to land one of the 36,400 positions available before 2020, you'll have needed a headstart. Certified therapists must earn at least a master's degree from an accredited university.

9. Computer Programmer
Salary Range: $40,820-$114,180
Unlike some of the others on the list, computer programmers might be able to enter the field with a two-year degree instead of a four-year bachelor's. But if you're going to advance, it's best to think of yourself as a perpetual student who's always staying just ahead of the latest programming language, says 30-year industry veteran Barry Warsaw. Computer programmers eeked out a spot on our top 10 thanks to strong job satisfaction numbers, competitive salaries, and excellent job prospects.

8. Physical Therapist
Salary Range: $53,620-$107,920
This is another healthcare job that requires a minimum of a master's degree to begin practicing. And with good reason, since physical therapists often see patients overcoming adversity: Injured athletes, amputees, and stroke victims might all find themselves working with these professionals to rebuild their range of motion, coordination, and muscle strength. This profession graces our top 10 not only because of its comfortable salary and good job prospects, but because it's also one of the faster-growing occupations of the next decade. There should be a nearly 40-percent increase in available positions by 2020.

7. Computer Systems Analyst
Salary Range: $48,360-$119,070
Think of this occupation as a very technically oriented project manager. Computer systems analysts determine the technological needs of their clients and then help configure a system to fulfill those needs. They often serve as a liaison between the client and another occupation on our top 10, software developers, when compiling a rundown of necessary hardware specifications. Similar to other information technology professions, computer systems analysts should have a minimum of a bachelor's degree in a computer-related field. David P. Bieg, chief operating officer for the International Institute for Business Analysis, also recommends that analysts-to-be spend time learning business systems analysis.

6. Web Developer
Salary Range: $43,190-$119,940
Web developers use their knowledge of applications and HTML code and couple that with an understanding of Web users' preferred browsing experience to create visually appealing, intuitive, and organized Web content. A bachelor's degree in a computer-related concentration is usually the first requirement to land one of the 65,700 expected jobs in this profession, but you could also study to receive certifications that designate your level of expertise. And there are a few other good qualities Web developers should have that can't be learned: patience, imagination, and versatility.

5. Database Administrator
Salary Range: $41,570-$115,660
Does anyone even use file cabinets anymore? Much of today's storage lives on a datachip, and competent database administrators (DBAs) are needed to build and maintain the systems used to house that information. Challenger explains why now is prime time to enter into this IT job: "The educational system hasn't caught up with the demand for technology skills. ... The education and preparation people need to qualify for science and technology jobs is extensive enough and requires so much that the population has yet to fully recognize the requirements to do the job." DBAs should earn a bachelor's degree in computer science or management information systems, and might want to pursue a master's in business administration. You should also obtain certification for as many database platforms as possible, so that your skills are transferable from one company to the next.

4. Medical Assistant
Salary Range: $20,810-$40,190
The Labor Department reports that there is no formal training required to become a medical assistant. But if you want to distinguish yourself from the more than 160,000 persons looking to enter this profession, then training is preferred. Some vocational high schools and colleges offer medical assisting programs. And professional associations like the American Association of Medical Assistants offer certification credentials. It’s also possible for a medical assistant to receive certification in particular specialties, such as podiatry or optometry.

3. Pharmacist
Salary Range: $82,090-$138,620
There are some obvious perks to this profession. The compensation is one—pharmacists earn one of the highest average salaries of all of our Best Jobs—and excellent job prospects is another. But these literal pill pushers also undergo years of study, several examinations, and a postgraduate residency before donning their white coats. And like many healthcare practitioners, pharmacists frequently work evening shifts, weekends, and some holidays. Place yourself ahead of the competition during your job hunt by trying to secure internships early in your education. Also consider taking a few business courses if your program doesn't already include them in the curriculum, since many pharmacists work within retail facilities.

2. Software Developer
Salary Range: $54,360-$87,790
According to Bryan Cantrill, the vice president of engineering with the cloud-computing company Joyent, software developers should have one hand writing code and the other on the pulse of the evolving IT world. Advances are constant in this industry, and having an inquisitive nature will serve a budding developer well. Nailing as much on-the-job training as possible will also help, particularly as some software developers are able to advance through the ranks based on their experience.

1. Registered Nurse
Salary Range: $44,190-$95,130
One of the first things you should determine when entering this field is what type of nursing you'd like to do. According to Michael Wolf, an economist with the BLS, one of the reasons this profession will gain nearly 712,000 positions this decade is because it's such an expansive profession, period. "Actually its growth rate is good, but not out of line with some other occupations," he says. "Registered nurses should grow by about 26 percent. The healthcare practitioner occupations as a whole have a growth rate of about 26 percent, though." The bench might be deep, but the playing field is still competitive. For a better chance at landing a nursing job, you'll want to determine your niche early, consider using virtual networking tools, and look for employment outside a hospital setting.

 

 Source: usnews

11 Good, Middle Class Jobs

While every worker has a different income goal, many would be happy reaching the $55,000 mark. As of 2010, the U.S. median household income was $49,445, so a job paying $55,000 is on the higher end of household earnings.

If you'd like to make $55,000 a year, check out this list of 11 occupations that pay around that amount. These jobs vary in education level required, industry and type of work, so there's something for almost everyone.


1. Anthropologist and archaeologist
What they do: Anthropologists and archaeologists study the origin, development and behavior of past and present humans. They examine the cultures, languages, archaeological remains and physical characteristics of people in various parts of the world.
  • Typical education level needed to enter the occupation: Master's degree
  • Median annual pay: $54,230


2. Boilermaker
What they do: Boilermakers install, maintain and repair boiler systems, a physically demanding and often dangerous job. Many workers travel to worksites and live away from home for long periods of time.
  • Typical education level: High-school diploma or equivalent
  • Median annual pay: $54,640


3. Cartographer and photogrammetrist
What they do: Cartographers and photogrammetrists measure, analyze and interpret geographic information to create maps and charts for political, cultural, educational and other purposes. Cartographers are general mapmakers, while photogrammetrists are specialists who use aerial photographs to create maps.
  • Typical education level: Bachelor's degree
  • Median annual pay: $54,510


4. Electrical and electronic engineering technician
What they do: These technicians help engineers design and develop computers, communications equipment, medical monitoring devices, navigational equipment and other electrical and electronic equipment. They test and evaluate products, using measuring and diagnostic devices.
  • Typical education level: Associate degree
  • Median annual pay: $56,040


5. Librarian
What they do: Librarians maintain library collections, help people find books and do other work as needed to keep a library operating.
  • Typical education level: Master's degree
  • Median annual pay: $54,500

6. Loan officer
What they do: Loan officers evaluate, authorize or recommend approval of loan applications for people and businesses. These officers often work for commercial banks, credit unions, mortgage companies or related financial institutions.
  • Typical education level: High-school diploma or equivalent
  • Median annual pay: $56,490


7. Police officer and detective
What they do: Police officers enforce laws to protect people and property. Detectives gather facts and supportive evidence to help uncover and solve crimes.
  • Typical education level: High-school diploma or equivalent
  • Median annual pay: $55,010


8. Radiologic technologist
What they do: Radiologic technologists perform diagnostic imaging examinations on patients. They work with radiologists to determine if other scans or images need to be taken.
  • Typical education level: Associate degree
  • Median annual pay: $54,340


9. Subway and streetcar operator
What they do: Subway and streetcar operators transport passengers in urban and suburban areas via vehicles that travel underground, on above-ground and elevated tracks, on streets or on separate tracks. These workers are most often employed by the local government.
  • Typical education level: High-school diploma or equivalent
  • Median annual pay: $56,880


10. Telecommunications equipment installer and repairer (except line installer)
What they do: Also known as telecom technicians, these workers set up and maintain devices or equipment that carry communications signals, connect to telephone lines or access the Internet.
  • Typical education level: Postsecondary nondegree award
  • Median annual pay: $54,710


11. Writer and author
What they do: Writers and authors develop content for books, advertisements, movies, music, websites, digital and print publications and other media.
  • Typical education level: Bachelor's degree
  • Median annual pay: $55,420






Source: Monster

Surprising Six-Figure Jobs

Clearing trees. Performing magic tricks. Pet sitting. Repairing other people's credit. These people are earning $100,000 or more.


Reads Minds, Does Magic Tricks
  • Name: Wayne Hoffman
  • Pay: $135,000
  • Age: 30

It all started as a hobby, when I got a magic set for Christmas as a kid. At college, I studied psychology. And that's when I started getting interested in mentalism, which is geared toward mind-reading.

Times were rough at first and I had to bust my butt to get jobs, but now I have to turn away business, and I can take off time whenever I want.

Companies hire me to do entertainment for them, I'm also hired to work at trade shows, where companies set up a booth and I incorporate their sales message into my magic. I do college campus tours twice a year. I perform at theaters, and I do cruise ships, where I get flown out to an exotic location and perform magic on the ship -- I've been to Tahiti, Bora Bora, Hawaii, Venice and Japan.

On the low end, I make $4,000 and it can go anywhere up to $30,000 for one show. I never thought I would be making this kind of money.

[Hoffman said his annual income ranges anywhere from $100,000 to $325,000 a year depending on the number of jobs he books].


Sells Recycled Ink Cartridges
  • Name: Lauren Elward
  • Pay: $165,500
  • Age: 33

I was an English teacher, and the copy machine at school was always breaking so I would make copies at home.

I had 125 kids a day. I can't count how many times I was running out to Staples getting more ink cartridges -- and it was all coming out of my pocket.

I looked online and there are companies out there [that recycle cartridges], but it wasn't a flooded market. So [my husband and I] invested about $1,000 and found some inexpensive guy from Europe to make a website for us.

We developed a relationship with a company that takes cartridges that have already been used, and recycles them, so they ship them out to our customers.

Our cartridges range from $10 to $30 -- if you were in the store you'd be paying $25 to $50 -- and toner [from our website, CastleInk.com] for the big copy machines can be hundreds of dollars cheaper.

I'm making quadruple what I made teaching. At one point, we were getting so many sales a day we couldn't believe how much money we were making.

People were like, "where are you getting this money to redo your whole backyard?" It's definitely nice to have, especially for a cushion for the kids. I'm putting a lot into savings for them.


Voice Actor For TV Commercials
  • Name: Jonathan Lockwood
  • Pay: $127,000
  • Age: 46

I got into radio when I was very young, at 17. I was a deejay, and recording commercials [for local businesses] was part of my job.

As I moved from station to station, I found there wasn't a lot of money. So I started doing TV commercials. And when I was 32, I finally left my last radio station to work out of my home studio [recording TV commercials].

I do a lot of commercials for national furniture retailers. I announce the big sales. I just did an infomercial for eDiets where I introduce people who had success on eDiets. I do car dealers and laser vision correction doctors. I did a voice-over for an animated medical documentary. I'm doing the on-hold system for [a bank], so while people are on hold, they're listening to me talking about the various things the bank is offering.

I probably send out a total of 25 invoices a month. To do a 30-second commercial in a local market could be $100 to $250 per commercial, depending on the size, and [bigger jobs] can be $500 per spot.

[What I like most is] that I'm in shorts and t-shirts every day in my home, that going to work every day involves stepping into one of my bedrooms, that it doesn't take very long. It would really surprise me if I'm working more than 18 or 20 hours a week.

 

Runs A Tree-Clearing Business
  • Name: Josh Skolnick
  • Pay: $250,000
  • Age: 29

When I was 10 or 11 years old I had my own little business pushing a lawn mower for people, and I continued with landscaping through middle school and high school. [By 2005, I had my own] mulch business. I had about 385 residential clients.

[One day], someone called and said they had a dead elm near their pool that no one would come cut down and remove. So I went out and [hired a contractor for the day to] cut down the tree. While I was out there, all the neighbors saw what I was doing and started asking me to cut down their trees, too.

After that, I started a tree service and sold my mulching business soon after.

Since starting [Monster Tree Service] in 2008, we've had over 10,000 customers. The first year in business we did well over $1 million in sales, and once we were three years in, we launched a franchise business.

I didn't go to college. But at 29 years old, I look at friends who just graduated medical school or are getting law degrees, still living at home with their parents, and I've got houses and millions of dollars worth of equipment.


Run Luxury Hotels For Dogs
  • Name: Steven and Jason Parker
  • Pay: $150,000-plus (each)
  • Age: 28 and 25

Steven: When we were kids we would always ask our parents for a dog for our birthdays and holidays. When I was 14 and Jason was 12, we said "what if we start a dog-sitting business to show our parents we're responsible enough to take care of a dog?"

We [took care of 50 dogs] and went back to our parents, and they said "it's not that we don't believe you have the responsibility, it's that we don't like dogs."

But we loved what we were doing anyway. So we opened [a luxury dog hotel] in 2005 and it was an immediate success.

Jason: [To set ourselves apart, we have] cage-free rooms and suites, outdoor window views, and plasma TVs playing "Animal Planet."

Steven: In 2010, we started franchising, and we [just] sold our sixth franchise. We plan to open 100 stores within the next three to five years.

It's the American dream. We're first-generation Americans and came from humble beginnings, and we're just getting started. We want to be the Donald Trump of the pet care industry.

We like to have fun, too. Jason bought a Maserati. We took our mother to Hawaii for her wedding anniversary and to her hometown in Italy.


Cleans Up Credit Reports
  • Name: Kevin Foster
  • Pay: $103,000
  • Age: 53

About five years ago, I went to go purchase a car, and the salesman said [no one would finance my loan]. Then he told me I had a 460 credit score. He said I needed to find someone to help me get my credit cleaned up. I called a [credit repair] company and enrolled.

It turned out there was another guy who lived in my same town with a very similar Social Security number, so his bad credit had gotten merged onto my credit report. [Once the credit repair company was done], my score went from a 460 to a 780.

[Three years later], I started going to national conferences that are like boot camps for credit repair and I learned how to legally and ethically launch my own company [TRW Credit Services].

I live in a small town and know every car dealership, every bank, so I started making phone calls to every person I knew at these places and told them my story. I said, "send me all your bad customers and I'll clean them up."

My total out of pocket was under $1,000 to launch my business out of a spare bedroom in our house.





Source: AOL

Most Underrated Jobs In America: Not Glamorous, But Well-Paid And Low Stress


underrated jobs
Finding a job in this economy isn't easy, but one way to get ahead is to take a look at careers that fly below the radar of other job hunters.

That's what CareerCast has done in unveiling its latest list of underrated jobs, careers that the job-search website says offer increasing opportunities for job seekers new to the labor force, as well as those who need a career change.

What makes a job underrated? CareerCast says it's a combination of desirable job attributes -- high growth, low stress and rewarding opportunities -- combined with relatively low consideration among job seekers. In other words, these jobs aren't high on the lists of many people when asked what kinds of jobs they'd like to do.

CareerCast's list includes a wide variety of professions and includes jobs for which only a bit of additional education is needed after high school, as well as those that require a specialized degree or additional schooling. Most of the jobs are also well paying, with more than half earning annual salaries that top $60,000.

Could one of these be the right career for you? Review the gallery below and find out.


Read more "12 most underrated jobs in USA"





Source: AOL

Numerology and careers

Chances are, you probably haven't considered numerology when it comes to your job search or career assessment. Even if you're a skeptic of  "New Age" ideas, you'll find that determining your personal number and discovering corresponding personality characteristics is interesting and fun, but you may also find it to be a valuable tool that can assist you in finding a job that will truly make you happy.
Put simply, numerology is the language of numbers and their corresponding symbolic significance. Each number has its own "vibratory" influence.
Based on the belief that a person comes into this life on a certain date with a certain name for specific spiritual reasons, the "numbers" from this incident are used to describe who a person is and their life map. All you need is the birth date of an individual to unlock the secrets of numbers.
Each number from one through nine has certain characteristics with strengths and weaknesses, adding an interesting aspect to career choice assessment and job satisfaction.
Let's examine Steve Jobs' numbers:
To calculate his birth path number, we do the following:
Steve Jobs birth date:
2/24/55
Add the numbers in the year together:
1 + 9 + 5 + 5 = 20
To the year number, add the month and day of birth:
20 + 2 + 24 = 46
Add the end result together to obtain a one-digit number:
4 + 6 = 10  then 1 + 0 = 1
This makes Steve Jobs a No. 1 birth path number. Think of his innovation, leadership and determination; all signs of a typical No. 1. A birth path No. 1 is an independent innovator who works best alone. No. 1's remain dignified and dutiful. They are business oriented and will work without any respite until they achieve great fame.  When someone displays positive No. 1 traits, they are capable of significant creative inspiration and possess the enthusiasm and drive to succeed. A No. 1 will welcome obstacles and challenges, as they achieve great pleasure from combining their strengths with a daring attitude. A No. 1's desire for independence is often apparent, and they can tire easily of routine.
Other No. 1's: Henry Ford, Dick Cheney, Tiger Woods, Maria Shriver, Sean Connery, George Lucas, Tom Hanks.
Traits based on your personal number
It's important to keep in mind that personal birth path numbers offer broad descriptions of personalities and personal attributes. To be sure, some may find their personal number doesn't seem to match; however, it will prompt some introspection, and you just might end up learning that the traits do match you!
A note about "master numbers:"
Master numbers, 11 and 22, are not reduced to a single number, and are treated as pure, lone numbers. Master numbers have a strong vibration and emphasis on great learning. These numbers possess more power than single numbers.

No.1

  • Leadership, independence.

  • A natural leader and innovator; excellent in management levels.

Ideal careers
Inventor
Designer
Director
Retail business owner
Producer
Sales manager
Engineer
Executive
Small business owner

No. 2

  • Cooperative, team player.

  • Doesn't mind not being the boss.

Ideal careers
Lawyer
Diplomat
Clerk
Caterer
Insurance adjuster
Architect

No. 3
  • Joyful, creative.

  • Multitalented; requires self-expression for happiness at work.

Ideal careers
Artist
Musician
Medical field
Lawyer
Athlete
Designer
Actor

No. 4

  • Structure; order.

  • Best when working with form and structure and they crave an organized environment to produce their best work.

Ideal careers
Building trades
Mechanic
Accountant
Executive
Software designer
Banking

No. 5

  • Craves variety.

  • An ideal communicator with strong language skills.

Ideal careers
Salesperson
Advertising
Writer
Teacher
Editor
Marketing
E-commerce
Actor
Lawyer

No. 6

  • Giving and receiving love.

  • Strong in service to others and domestic concerns.

Ideal careers
Homemaker
Teacher
Artist
Florist
Singer
Beautician
Fashion field
Musician
Caterer

No. 7

  • Spiritual inner knowledge.

  • Philosophical with a yearning for truth and education.

Ideal careers
Healer
Author
Farmer
Photographer
Researcher

No. 8

  • Material expression.

  • Competitive and authoritative.

Ideal careers
Banker
Financier
Pharmacist
Engineer
Lawyer
Broker
Real estate

No. 9

  • Humanitarian endeavors.

  • Idealistic and compassionate.

Ideal careers
Scientist
Spiritual leader
Doctor
Teacher
Clergy
Diplomat


Using numerology to help navigate through life and business can help you achieve success and happiness and overcome obstacles. Numerology is easier to grasp when put into context of how the entire world revolves around numbers and mathematical equations. It stands to reason that the numbers we are born with play an integral role in determining our blueprint throughout our life journey.




Source: careerbuilder

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