Top 7 Jobs In Finance For 2014

Put your money on growth in finance work


Traders working out figures in dealing room
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By Susan Ricker

A recovering economy doesn't mean that all areas of hiring are slow. In fact, hiring in financial services occupations is likely to pick up in 2014, according to a new survey from CareerBuilder and MoneyJobs.com -- CareerBuilder's job site for finance and accounting professionals.

As businesses continue to regrow and establish more savvy ways to operate, they require smart financial minds to bring their business back. From financial analysts to accountants to credit counselors, there are a variety of ways that finances need to be monitored and moved, and workers are needed to fill these roles.

Hiring is up in financial services


Financial services occupations are needed by all industries for their expertise in budgets, finances and spending. And there's high demand for their help. In a nationwide survey of financial services hiring managers and human resources professionals, 35 percent of financial services employers are increasing full-time headcount this year compared to 2013 -- 11 points above the national average and up from 27 percent in 2013. 

"Job growth in financial services is expected to outpace job growth for all occupations in 2014," says Kevin Knapp, chief financial officer for CareerBuilder. "This is good news for job seekers in the sector, whose skills will be in-demand across a range of businesses and occupations that typically offer highly-competitive wages."

Top financial services jobs for 2014


The following list of financial services occupations each grew at least 5 percent from 2010-2013 and are projected to grow faster than average growth for all jobs in 2014.*

Total employment in 2013: 63,449
Added 4,973 jobs from 2010-2013, up 9 percent
Median hourly earnings: $29.36

Find a job as a credit analyst.

Total employment in 2013: 257,055
Added 16,956 jobs from 2010-2013, up 7 percent
Median hourly earnings: $36.82

Find a job as a financial analyst.

Total employment in 2013: 22,586
Added 1,369 jobs from 2010-2013, up 6 percent
Median hourly earnings: $45.04

Find a job as a actuary.

Total employment in 2013: 227,974
Added 12,417 jobs from 2010-2013, up 6 percent
Median hourly earnings: $32.11

Find a job as a personal financial adviser.

Total employment in 2013: 28,579
Added 1,521 jobs from 2010-2013, up 5 percent
Median hourly earnings: $18.96

Find a job as a credit counselor.

Total employment in 2013: 30,117
Added 1,568 jobs from 2010-2013, up 5 percent
Median hourly earnings: $36.44

Find a job as a financial examiner.

Total employment in 2013: 1,311,816
Added 67,614 jobs from 2010-2013, up 5 percent
Median hourly earnings: $30.21

Find a job as an accountant/auditor.

How to join the field


If you're considering joining the financial services industry, or are angling for a new position, it's good to know the field's standards. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, most finance jobs typically require a bachelor's degree in a finance-related subject, such as accounting, finance or economics.

Many workers also have certifications or licenses from industry-specific authorities, such as the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, the main licensing organization for the securities industry. It requires licenses for many financial analyst positions. According to the BLS, "Most of the licenses require sponsorship by an employer, so companies do not expect individuals to have these licenses before starting a job."

For instance, for financial analysts, the BLS says, "Certification is often recommended by employers and can improve the chances for advancement. An example is the Chartered Financial Analyst certification from the CFA Institute, which financial analysts can get if they have a bachelor's degree, four years of experience and pass three exams. Financial analysts can also become certified in their field of specialty."

6 Social Media Jobs That Will Be Big in 2014

Companies of all sizes have embraced social as a staple


By Andrea Fisher

Social media has transformed the way people socialize, network and stay in touch. We've seen large social networks like MySpace and Friendster come and go, and other ones like Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare and LinkedIn completely transform and redefine our online trends.

One thing is abundantly clear: social media is now necessary for global commerce, and 2014 will be the catalyst for vital social media marketing positions. Social media is more than liking or retweeting a post; it's a new, cutting-edge marketing medium with unlimited potential. According to Constant Contact's Small Businesses: Then and Now Survey conducted in May 2013, social media marketing has exploded, with 87 percent of small businesses using social media as a marketing tool today.

Since social media marketing requires a combination of analytical skills, good communication and performing extensive research, you can bet business, communications and English-related degrees are good candidates for 2014 social media job openings.

Explore the new frontier of marketing with these six up-and-coming social media positions:

1. Search engine optimization (SEO) specialist

Companies want to be visible to potential and current customers. To do so, SEO specialists are essential. SEO specialists wear many different hats, each of which are designed to boost website rankings within relevant search results.

This job involves analyzing websites, testing different marketing techniques and creating new quality content. SEO specialists also use social media websites to market new content. In an age where digital technology outperforms print sources, social media is a quick way to spread more than status updates and commercial information.

SEO specialist positions often require a bachelor's degree and at least one to three years of Web experience. Knowledge in HTML, CSS and blogging is a plus.

Approximate annual salary: $69,000

2. Social media strategist

Social media strategists work on creating a public profile for companies, allowing them to interact freely with customers on social media sites. Though posts are about company services and products, these business social media accounts help develop an interactive business-customer relationship.

It's marketing by humanizing a company through online social interactions. The more social media followers a company has, the more their products and services are recognized.

Social media strategist positions often require a bachelor's degree and two years of previous work experience in social media marketing.

Approximate annual salary: $61,000

3. Online community manager

An online community manager is a liaison between a company and an online community (e.g., social networks, message boards and email groups). As more people come together online to share similar interests and ideals, online marketers have the perfect opportunity to target these groups and pitch their own products and services.

The online community manager's goal is to use online communities to increase brand loyalty and Web traffic and to maximize their company's social media marketing strategy.

It involves analytical, creative and business-oriented skills to promote a company, products and services. An online community manager never has the same job any single day; it involves adapting to new online technologies and social media tools.

This position often requires a bachelor's degree, two years within a business setting and experience with Photoshop, video editing and website development.

Approximate annual salary: $59,000

4. Social media marketing manager

Social media marketing managers oversee the design and execution of social media marketing strategies. Their goal is to drive audience growth and bring their company and brands to the forefront.

A number of social media tools are used to analyze the best marketing tactics for each social site. Since each social networking platform works differently, content has to be adapted to maximize its effects. The social media marketing manager oversees the communications strategy for these platforms and delegates their goals and expectations to the rest of the online marketing team.

Social media marketing manager positions often require a bachelor's degree (an MBA is sometimes preferred), a minimum of five years of digital marketing experience, excellent verbal/written communication skills and a solid understanding of social media platforms.

Approximate annual salary: $57,000

5. Social media marketing coordinator

Social media marketing coordinators write unique content and take photos and videos for the social media accounts they administer. The position involves frequent social media post updates (hours on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, Pinterest, etc.) and use of social media analysis tools.

A college degree isn't required, but strong written/verbal skills, proficient blogging and knowledge of social media platforms and video editing are all necessities of the position.

Approximate annual salary: $47,000

6. Blogger or social media copywriter

The word "blogger" has become overly generalized as a simple hobby for some people. But for businesses and marketing firms worldwide, bloggers and social media copywriters are essential in creating an online presence. It's a strategy of numbers, and the role of the blogger is crucial for receiving online attention.

There's a dual function behind this position: 1) create engaging and factual online content via blog posts, social media networks, message boards etc.; and 2) attract readers and followers.

Posts often include keywords that, when clicked on, redirect readers to a specific company website or related page. Where a spammer presents irrelevant, flashy content to readers, bloggers and social media copywriters deliver valuable online information to their readers.

Bloggers and social media copywriters require exceptional written skills to deliver concise information. A college degree isn't required, but is often preferred.

Approximate annual salary: $43,000

In 2014, prepare for a new chapter in online marketing. Social media marketing will help personalize the business experience and reach an unlimited pool of potential consumers. Since online social demands will only continue to grow and evolve, these positions will redefine marketing's online future - and it begins here.

 

16 jobs that pay $40,000


Numbers are an important part of our lives. Just consider all of the numbers we think about or recite on a regular basis: our birthday, address, social security number, phone number and paycheck. As to that last number, sometimes it's the one we count on the most.
Everyone has a different idea of what they'd like the number on their paycheck to be. Many workers would find that an annual salary of $40,000 would allow them to meet their own financial obligations or provide for their household. For jobs with a wide range of responsibilities and education levels, check out any of these 16 jobs that pay around $40,000 a year.

Job description: Athletic trainers specialize in preventing, diagnosing and treating muscle and bone injuries and illnesses. They work with people of all ages and skill levels, from young children to soldiers and professional athletes.
Typical education level: Bachelor's degree
Median annual pay: $41,600


Job description: Biological technicians help biological and medical scientists conduct laboratory tests and experiments. They also set up, maintain and clean laboratory instruments, gather and prepare samples, conduct biological tests, document their work, analyze experimental data and write reports.
Typical education level: Bachelor's degree
Median annual pay: $39,020


Job description: Broadcast and sound engineering technicians set up, operate and maintain the electrical equipment for radio and television broadcasts, concerts, sound recordings and movies and in office and school buildings.
Typical education level: High school diploma or equivalent
Median annual pay: $39,870


Job description: Carpenters construct and repair building frameworks and structures -- such as stairways, doorframes, partitions and rafters -- made from wood and other materials. They also may install kitchen cabinets, siding and drywall.
Typical education level: High school diploma or equivalent
Median annual pay: $39,530


Job description: Chefs and head cooks oversee the daily food preparation at restaurants or other places where food is served. They direct kitchen staff and handle any food-related concerns.
Typical education level: High school diploma or equivalent
Median annual pay: $40,630


Job description: Construction equipment operators drive, maneuver or control the heavy machinery used to construct roads, bridges, buildings and other structures.
Typical education level: High school diploma or equivalent
Median annual pay: $39,460


Job description: Correctional officers are responsible for overseeing individuals who have been arrested and are awaiting trial or who have been sentenced to serve time in a jail, reformatory or prison.
Typical education level: High school diploma or equivalent
Median annual pay: $39,020


Job description: Diesel service technicians and mechanics inspect, repair or overhaul buses, trucks and anything else with a diesel engine.
Typical education level: High school diploma or equivalent
Median annual pay: $40,850


Job description: Environmental science and protection technicians do laboratory and field tests to monitor the environment and investigate sources of pollution, including those affecting health. Many work under the supervision of environmental scientists and specialists, who direct their work and evaluate their results.
Typical education level: Associate degree
Median annual pay: $41,380


Job description: Licensed practical and licensed vocational nurses provide basic nursing care. They work under the direction of registered nurses and doctors. They typically monitor patients' health, administer basic nursing care, discuss health care with patients and keep patient records.
Typical education level: Postsecondary nondegree award
Median annual pay: $40,380


Job description: Machinists and tool and die makers set up and operate a variety of computer-controlled or mechanically-controlled machine tools to produce precision metal parts, instruments and tools.
Typical education level: High school diploma or equivalent
Median annual pay: $39,910


Job description: Mental health counselors and marriage and family therapists help people manage or overcome mental and emotional disorders and problems with their family and relationships. They listen to clients and ask questions to help the clients understand their problems and develop strategies to improve their lives.
Typical education level: Master's degree
Median annual pay: $39,710


Job description: Recreational therapists plan, direct and coordinate recreation programs for people with disabilities or illnesses. They use a variety of techniques, including arts and crafts, drama, music, dance, sports, games and field trips. These programs help maintain or improve a client's physical and emotional well-being.
Typical education level: Bachelor's degree
Median annual pay: $39,410


Job description: Sheet metal workers fabricate or install products that are made from thin metal sheets, such as ducts used for heating and air-conditioning.
Typical education level: High school diploma or equivalent
Median annual pay: $41,710


Job description: Surgical technologists, also called operating room technicians, assist in surgical operations. They prepare operating rooms, arrange equipment and help doctors and nurses during surgeries.
Typical education level: Postsecondary nondegree award
Median annual pay: $39,920


Job description: Water and wastewater treatment plant and system operators manage a system of machines, often through the use of control boards, to transfer or treat water or wastewater.
Typical education level: High school diploma or equivalent
Median annual pay: $40,770

10 Least Stressful Jobs Of 2014

Gigs that offer job security and a good hiring outlook


Businessman jumping over city
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The new year is of course the season for resolutions. And right after "lose weight" usually comes something along the lines of "worry less" or "don't get so stressed all the time." But for most Americans, such desires may seem like a pipe dream given their working reality; while improved, the unemployment rate still stands at 7 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Amid such an environment, are there any opportunities out there for a low-stress working life? Yes, according to CareerCast.com, the job-search portal site. The site has just released its list of of the least stressful jobs for 2014. (The list is put together by CareerCast.com and is based on data provided by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and other industry trade groups. In total, 200 jobs are tracked by the website.)

Are there are any consistencies among the low-stress jobs? According to Tony Lee, the publisher of CareerCast.com, the highest-ranking jobs on the low-stress list offer "job security, a good hiring outlook and salary but few physical demands, deadlines and danger," he said in press release.

See below for the 10 least stressful jobs of 2014. 
(Outlook is the growth in hiring in the sector expected by 2020, as projected by the BLS, which also provides the average salary information.) 


Median Salary: $35,580
Outlook: 6 percent

Find a job now as a drill press operator


Median Salary: $61,370
Outlook: 8 percent

Find a job now as a multimedia artist.


Median Salary: $55,370
Outlook: 7 percent

Find a job now as a librarian.


Median Salary: $34,160
Outlook: 21 percent

Find a job now as a medical records technician.


Median Salary: $55,240
Outlook: 20 percent

Find a job now as a dietitian.


Median Salary: $26,280
Outlook: 1 percent

Find a job now as a seamstress or as a tailor.

4. University Professor (tenured)

Median Salary: $64,290
Outlook: 17 percent

Find a job now as a university professor


Median Salary: $35,350
Outlook: - 5 percent

Find a job now as a jeweler.


Median Salary: $22,700
Outlook: 14 percent

Find a job now as a hairstylist.


Median Salary: $69,720
Outlook 37 percent

Find a job now as an audiologist.

10 Most Stressful Jobs Of 2014

Jobs for which you can't just take Friday off

Customers waiting to be helped
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Are there any jobs out there anymore that aren't stress-inducing? Given the drive to "disrupt" all workplaces to come up with new strategic initiatives, among other competitive forces in a bruising economy, the answer is probably, "no." But surely some jobs are still more stressful than others.

So which are the most stressful? CareerCast.com, the job-search portal site, has compiled its list of the most stressful jobs for the new year, and many of the results are hardly surprising. "Surely if your job is to work with IUD's in Iraq, you probably have one of the most stressful jobs in the country," Tony Lee, the publisher of CareerCast.com, told AOL Jobs in an interview. "But jobs like being a soldier provide an adrenaline rush that many workers seek out."

(The list is put together by CareerCast.com and is based on data provided by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and other industry trade groups. In total, 200 jobs are tracked by the website.)

But as Lee also recognized, stress can emerge in any job due to individual circumstances like a bad boss. "We look at things that are out of the workers' control," he said. "And we notice many of the most stressful jobs are ones in which workers have no control over their day. Jobs for which you can't really take a Friday off for. You are expected to do a certain set of responsibilities, or someone's life, or even your own, could be in danger."

See below for the 10 most stressful jobs of 2014. (Outlook is the growth in hiring in the sector expected by 2020, as projected by the BLS, which also provides the average salary information.) 


Median Salary: $22,820
Outlook: 20 percent

Find a job now as a taxi driver.


Median Salary: $55,270
Outlook: 7 percent

Find a job now as a police officer.


Median Salary: $35,870
Outlook: -6 percent

Find out more about newspaper reporters.


Median Salary: $168,140
Outlook: 5 percent

Find a job now as a senior corporate executive.


Median Salary: $54,170
Outlook: 21 percent

Find a job now as a public relations executive.


Median Salary: $45,810
Outlook: 44 percent

Find a job now as an event coordinator.


Median Salary: $114,200
Outlook: 11 percent

Find out more about airline pilots.


Median Salary: $45,250
Outlook: 9 percent

Find a job now as a firefighter.


Median Salary: $196,300
Outlook: n/a

Find a job now as a military general.


Median Salary: $28,840
Outlook: n/a

Find a job now as an enlisted military personnel.

A Map Of Where The Most Jobs Are

CareerBuilder and EMSI identify regional pockets of job growth

Act Now
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By Susan Ricker

You've most likely heard of the term "Big Data," but what does it mean? And why, as a job seeker, is it important to you? Big Data is the phenomenon of large amounts of consumer information, used in a practical application. For example, many grocery stores use loyalty cards, which capture your purchasing habits and allow the company to give you coupons or other rewards that are relevant to you, all while learning about you as a consumer.

Similarly, CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists International have culled our labor market database of over 90 national and state employment resources to identify key industries that are driving job growth for the 100 most populous U.S. metros.* These findings were put into an interactive map (click here to start exploring), which reveals 10 of the most important detailed industries for each clickable location. 

STEM Jobs Driving Growth
The map was created to gain insight about the driving industries in economies across the country, and revealed some important information: First, science, technology, engineering and mathematics jobs are a major factor in driving growth. After all, while the professional, scientific and technical industry sector makes up only 6 percent of the U.S. workforce, according to EMSI, it was responsible for 10 percent of job growth from 2010 to 2012. Second, while the larger metros are creating jobs, it's the smaller metros that have very diverse economies and which are creating the most significant job growth.

"Since 2010, the national workforce has grown four percent, but more than 40 large metros have eclipsed the national growth rate," said Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder. "These are metros with a strong concentration of computer systems design, software publishing and data processing and hosting firms. These are metros benefitting from the resurgence in U.S. manufacturing, and the nation's need to find new energy sources and expand healthcare services."

Where Industries Cluster
The map also reveals pockets of the U.S. where key industries are clustered among the largest cities:
Motor vehicles parts manufacturing has traditionally been focused in Rust Belt cities, but Southern metros such as Birmingham, Louisville and Nashville are emerging in this sector.
Oil and gas extraction is a major driver of high-wage job growth in Texas, Oklahoma and the surrounding region. It's also becoming a driver of job growth in Denver.
General freight trucking is concentrated in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast (Nashville, Memphis, Jacksonville, etc.), where transportation routes are plentiful and huge population centers are in close range.
Software publishing has a big presence in Silicon Valley, but is also growing in major markets such as Seattle, Boston, Atlanta and Denver.
General medical and surgical hospitals are driving jobs in Columbus, Chicago, Baltimore, Boston, Rochester and St. Louis, among others.
Highway, street and bridge construction has seen an uptick in jobs in Baton Rouge, Oklahoma City and San Antonio as cities rebuild after natural disasters and address other public concerns.



In a separate study of the same 100 metros, CareerBuilder and EMSI discovered which metros have added the most jobs per capita post-recession:

1. Salt Lake City, UTadded over 62,000 jobs since 2010, up 9 percent (534 new jobs per 10,000 people)
Originally a farming community, Salt Lake City has grown into an industrial center for the state. Industries that have experienced strong job growth in this metro include electronic shopping and mail order houses (up 43 percent), software publishing (up 28 percent), specialized freight trucking (up 23 percent) and credit intermediation (up 22 percent).

2. Grand Rapids-Wyoming, MIadded over 39,000 jobs since 2010, up 10 percent (513 new jobs per 10,000 people)
This manufacturing heavyweight has benefitted from the rebound of production jobs after the recession. The metro saw job increases in various manufacturing segments such as plastics product (up 35 percent), motor vehicle parts (up 33 percent), metalworking machinery (up 30 percent) and office furniture (up 12 percent). Hospitals also accounted for an upswing in jobs (up 16 percent).

3. San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CAadded over 91,000 jobs since 2010, up 10 percent (498 new jobs per 10,000 people)
It's no surprise that software publishing (up 30 percent), computer systems design (up 19 percent), data processing and hosting (up 16 percent), computer manufacturing (up 12 percent) and scientific research (up 9 percent) are big contributors to employment for this Silicon Valley metro.

4. Austin-Round Rock- San Marcos, TX added over 90,000 jobs since 2010, up 11 percent (488 new jobs per 10,000 people)
Austin has made a name for itself as a technology and business hub, fueling job growth in management, scientific and consulting services (up 35 percent), computer systems design (up 35 percent), data processing and hosting (up 35 percent) and semiconductor manufacturing (up 17 percent).

5. Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX added over 281,000 jobs since 2010, up 10 percent (451 new jobs per 10,000 people)
Energy-rich Houston continues to see job growth in utility system construction (specifically, oil and gas pipeline, up 45 percent), mining support (up 38 percent), metal and mineral (except petroleum) wholesalers (up 31 percent), oil and gas extraction (up 25 percent), and architectural and engineering services (up 21 percent).

*EMSI data is collected from more than 90 federal and state sources, such as the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the U.S. Census Bureau, and state labor departments. EMSI removes suppressions often found in publically available data and includes proprietors, creating a complete picture of the workforce.

20 companies hiring in January


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As 2014 starts, people everywhere are vowing to go to the gym more often, eat healthier and save more money. New Year’s resolutions such as these can be easy to make, but they’re not always so easy to keep.

If your resolution this year is to get a new job, you hopefully will be able to see this one through, if you take a look at the following 20 companies that are hiring this month. 

Start your New Year off right by applying to one of these great companies that are hiring across different industries, levels and job functions.


Industry: Office/clerical, finance/accounting, technical, health care and human resources
Sample job titles: Senior accountant, tax manager, receptionist, Web developer, human resources manager
Location: Greater Chicago area


Industry: IT, call center, sales
Sample job titles: Sales executive — inside sales — inbound sales (call center/IT sales), inside sales representative (IT sales call center)
Location: Boca Raton, Fla.


Industry: Recruiting and staffing services
Sample job titles: Software engineer, medical coder, welder, industrial engineer, project manager, clinical research associate, chemist, architect
Location: Nationwide


Industry: Health care
Sample job titles: Resident care director, sales director, executive director, activities director, licensed practical nurse
Location: Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia


Industry: Child care
Sample job titles: Pre-kindergarten teacher, infant teacher, bus driver, lead teacher, assistant teacher, substitute teacher
Location: Pennsylvania, Virginia, New Jersey, Illinois, New York, Massachusetts, Ohio, Wisconsin, Delaware, Indiana, Maryland, North Carolina


Industry: Medical equipment
Sample job titles: Sales representative, regional trainer, administrative assistant
Location: California, Georgia, New Jersey, Virginia, Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, Illinois, Arizona, Colorado


Industry: Sales and IT
Sample job titles: Sales representative, technical support operations supervisor, business system analyst, director of treasury, financial analyst, great plain/business intelligence, staff tax accountant
Location: Moorestown, N.J.; Melville, N.Y.; Denver; Phoenix; San Antonio, Texas; Boston; Columbus, Ohio; Jacksonville, Fla.


Industry: Home health care
Sample job titles: Caregiver, home health aide, certified nursing assistant
Location: Nationwide


Industry: Information technology
Sample job titles: Entry-level recruiter, Java developer, cable tech Wi-Fi installer, software engineer, helpdesk 
Location: Atlanta; Dallas; Chicago; Los Angeles; San Francisco; Charlotte, N.C.; Seattle


Industry: IT staffing 
Sample job titles: Software developer, project manager, project coordinator
Location: Orlando and Tampa, Fla.; Washington, D.C.; Chicago; Charlotte, N.C.


Industry: Engineering and environmental consulting
Sample job titles: Geotechnical engineer, environmental engineer, civil engineer, environmental compliance manager, GIS programmer, network engineer, survey technician, laser scanning technician, accounting compliance manager, senior accountant, marketing coordinator
Location: New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Florida, North Dakota, California


Industry: Retail 
Sample job titles: Sales manager, sales manager in training, sales associate, warehouse manager
Location: Nationwide


Industry: Mortgage
Sample job titles: Mortgage loan officer, branch manager, area manager
Location: Nationwide


Industry: Real estate
Sample job titles: Regional manager, property manager, concierge, maintenance technician, maintenance superintendent, leasing consultant, administrative assistant, multi-site property manager, accounts receivable associate, administrative manager
Location: New York, Illinois, Massachusetts, Connecticut, California, Texas, New Jersey, California, North Carolina, Colorado, Virginia


Industry: Food industry
Sample job titles: Assistant kitchen manager, assistant meat manager, meat cutter, cook, line cook
Location: Boston and surrounding areas


Industry: Mental health
Sample job titles: Early childhood educator, speech and language pathologist, mental health clinician/clinical social worker, occupational therapist, social worker
Location: Brockton, Worcester, Lynn, Boston, Plymouth, Dorchester, Lowell and Swansea, Mass.; Hartford, Conn.


Industry: Nonprofit/housing
Sample job titles: Property manager, maintenance technician, development project manager
Location: Boston; Chicago; Cincinnati; Worcester, New Bedford and Holliston, Mass.; Tory and New York City, N.Y.; Coatesville, Pa.; Washington, D.C.


18. ULINE            
Industry: Shipping and packaging — office supplies — equipment, packaging, retail
Sample job titles: Customer service, distribution manager, director of talent acquisition, inside sales, IT, marketing, recruiter, supply chain, warehouse
Location: Nationwide


19. Ultimate Staffing (part of Roth Staffing Companies)
Industry: Staffing for administrative, customer service, call center and human resources 
Sample job titles: Administrative assistant, customer service representative, call center representative, human resources representative
Location: Nationwide


Industry: Cloud technology
Sample job titles: Storage engineer, .Net engineer, software sales
Location: Bethesda, Md.; Atlanta; Vienna, Va.; Dallas, Texas; Tampa, Miami and Jacksonville, Fla.; Chicago; Denver; Phoenix; Las Vegas

10 Best Jobs For People Who Love Math

Exercise your number-crunching talents at one of these high-paying careers



University Of Oxford And Its Smith School Of Enterprise And Environment Host ReSource 2012
Getty ImagesHans Rosling, Statistician & Founder of Gapminder speaks about the impact of growing global population on resources at the ReSource 2012 conference on July 12, 2012 in Oxford, England.


By Vivian Giang

In today's data-driven economy, those with excellent math skills don't have to look far to find high-paying, high-growth jobs open for the taking.

To find out which jobs offer the best opportunities for people who love math, we analyzed CareerCast's list of the top 200 occupations in 2013 and pulled out those jobs that require analytical math skills.

CareerCast, a job search site, measured the stress, physical demands, and both the current and future employment outlook of the 200 occupations.

The overall score for each job takes into account the pay; hiring outlook; stress; emotional factors, including the level of competitiveness and degree of public contact; and physical demands, such as stamina required and work conditions, that normally come with the job. Once the categories are combined, a lower overall score signals that the job is more desirable to employees.

Much of the data used to evaluate the jobs comes from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, other government agencies, trade associations, and private survey firms.


10. Economist

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Overall score: 654

Annual median salary: $91,210

BLS projected growth (through 2020): -2.9%

Work environment score: 48

Stress score: 17

What they do: Studies and analyzes the effects of resources such as land, labor, and raw materials, on costs and their relation to industry and government.

The ranking is based on data that weighted stress, physical demands, and both the current and future employment outlook across 200 occupations from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Find a job now as an economist.


9. Stockbroker

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Overall score: 609

Annual median salary: $72,484

BLS projected growth (through 2020): 15%

Work environment score: 70

Stress score: 39

What they do: Facilitates the purchase and sale of stocks, bonds, and other securities for individual and institutional clients.

The ranking is based on data that weighted stress, physical demands, and both the current and future employment outlook across 200 occupations from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Find a job now as a stockbroker.


8. Tax examiner (tax collector)

Low Income Tax Clinic
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Overall score: 560

Annual median salary: $50,210

BLS projected growth (through 2020): 8%

Work environment score: 50

Stress score: 17

What they do: Determines tax liability and collects taxes from individuals or businesses.

The ranking is based on data that weighted stress, physical demands, and both the current and future employment outlook across 200 occupations from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Find a job now as a tax examiner.

7. Insurance underwriter

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Overall score: 526

Annual median salary: $61,182

BLS projected growth (through 2020): 6%

Work environment score: 46

Stress score: 16

What they do: Assesses and analyzes the risks inherent in insuring potential policy holders before making recommendations to the insurance companies that employ them.

The ranking is based on data that weighted stress, physical demands, and both the current and future employment outlook across 200 occupations from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Find a job now as an insurance underwriter.


6. Accountant

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Overall score: 405

Annual median salary: $63,175

BLS projected growth (through 2020): 14%

Work environment score: 48

Stress score: 19

What they do: Prepares and analyzes financial reports to assist managers in business, industry, and government.

The ranking is based on data that weighted stress, physical demands, and both the current and future employment outlook across 200 occupations from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Find a job now as an accountant.


5. Astronomer

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Overall score: 357

Annual median salary: $96,228

BLS projected growth (through 2020): 15%

Work environment score: 50

Stress score: 21

What they do: Uses principles of physics and mathematics to understand the workings of the universe.

The ranking is based on data that weighted stress, physical demands, and both the current and future employment outlook across 200 occupations from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Find a job now as an astronomer.

4. Meteorologist

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Overall score: 326

Annual median salary: $90,183

BLS projected growth (through 2020): 13%

Work environment score: 47

Stress score: 14

What they do: Studies the physical characteristics, motions, and processes of Earth's atmosphere.

The ranking is based on data that weighted stress, physical demands, and both the current and future employment outlook across 200 occupations from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Find a job now as a meteorologist.


3. Statistician

University Of Oxford And Its Smith School Of Enterprise And Environment Host ReSource 2012
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Overall score: 296

Annual median salary: $74,200

BLS projected growth (through 2020): 14%

Work environment score: 44

Stress score: 14

What they do: Tabulates, analyzes, and interprets the numeric results of experiments and surveys.

The ranking is based on data that weighted stress, physical demands, and both the current and future employment outlook across 200 occupations from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Find a job now as a statistician.


2. Financial planner

Mature man calculating bills and a mid adult woman talking on a mobile phone beside him
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Overall score: 159

Annual median salary: $107,222

BLS projected growth (through 2020): 32%

Work environment score: 49

Stress score: 19

What they do: Related to careers in portfolio management, the financial planner offers a broad range of services aimed at assisting individuals in managing and planning their financial future.

The ranking is based on data that weighted stress, physical demands, and both the current and future employment outlook across 200 occupations from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Find a job now as a financial planner.


1. Actuary

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Overall score: 123

Annual median salary: $91,211

BLS projected growth (through 2020): 29%

Work environment score: 44

Stress score: 16

What they do: Interprets statistics to determine probabilities of accidents, sickness, and death, and loss of property from theft and natural disasters.

The ranking is based on data that weighted stress, physical demands, and both the current and future employment outlook across 200 occupations from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Find a job now as an actuary.

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