Companies hiring this week

Who's hiring this week


Job seekers, here is our weekly list of 10 companies that are hiring this week. Click on the company names to learn more about the opportunities available.

1. AAA NortheastIndustry: Insurance and travel
Sample job titles: Travel agent, roadside technician, call center representative, insurance agent
Location: Rhode Island, New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts
2. American Medical ResponseIndustry: Health care
Sample job titles: Paramedic, EMT
Location: Nationwide
3. Army National GuardIndustry: Military
Sample job titles: Infantryman management training, light-wheel vehicle mechanic, food services specialist
Location: Nationwide
4. Client Services IncorporatedIndustry: Financial services
Sample job titles: Customer service representative, call center representative
Location: St Charles, Mo.; Lenexa, Kan.
5. JM Wilson CorporationIndustry: Insurance
Sample job titles: Assistant transportation underwriter, branch manager, property and casualty underwriter
Location: Westerville, Ohio
6. Lawrence Merchandising ServicesIndustry: Retail merchandising
Sample job titles: Part-time merchandiser
Location: Nationwide
7. Orbital ATKIndustry: Aerospace manufacturer
Sample job titles: Manufacturing engineer, mechanical engineer, aerospace engineer
Location:Dulles, Va.; Chandler and Gilbert, Ariz.; Northridge, Calif.; Plymouth, Minn.; Luka, Miss.; Clearfield, Utah
8. PenfedIndustry: Banking/financial services
Sample job titles: Credit card representative, branch support representative, IT security engineer
Location:Nebraska, Virginia, Oregon, Pennsylvania
9. WhitlockIndustry: Computer software
Sample job titles: Sales representative, customer support, audiovisual systems programmer, on-site audiovisual service technician, field service technician
Location: Nationwide
10. WIS Intl.Industry: Retail
Sample job titles: Inventory associate/counter, inventory supervisor, inventory manager, area manager, district manager
Location:Nationwide

Companies hiring this month

Who's hiring this month



Check out these 19 companies with open positions this month.

June is the month we celebrate dads and grads. So whether you're gearing up to join the workforce with your newly minted diploma or you're looking for a job change that will make Dad proud, take a look at these 19 companies hiring in the coming month.
1. 84 Lumber
Industry: Construction
Sample job titles: Manager trainee
Location: Nationwide
2. AAA Northeast
Industry: Insurance and travel
Sample job titles: Travel Agents, Roadside Technicians, Call Center Representatives, Insurance Agents
Location: Rhode Island, New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts
3. Aetna
Industry: Healthcare
Sample job titles: Case manager, RN, health coach consultant, clinical care manager
Location: Nationwide
4. American Medical Response
Industry: Healthcare
Sample job titles: Paramedic, EMT
Location: Nationwide
5. Army National Guard
Industry: Military
Sample job titles: Infantryman management training, light-wheel vehicle mechanic, food services specialist
Location: Nationwide
6. Client Services Incorporated
Industry: Financial services
Sample job titles: Customer service representative, call center representative
Location: St Charles, Mo.; Lenexa, Kan.
7. Einstein Health Network
Industry: Healthcare
Sample job titles: Registered nurse, physical therapist, radiology technician
Location: Philadelphia
8. EmCare, Inc.
Industry: Healthcare
Sample job titles: Billing coordinator, site coordinator
Location: Nationwide
9. Epic Health Services
Industry: Home health
Sample job titles: Registered nurse, licensed practical nurse, speech language pathologist, physical therapist, occupational therapist, board certified behavioral analyst
Location: Texas, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Missouri, Indiana, Arizona, Illinois, Colorado, Maryland, Virginia, Louisiana, North Carolina, Oregon, Nevada, Washington, Michigan, Georgia, South Carolina, and Florida.
10. JM Wilson Corporation
Industry: Insurance
Sample job titles: Assistant transportation underwriter, branch manager, property and casualty underwriter
Location: Westerville, Ohio
11. Kindred at Home
Industry: Healthcare
Sample job titles: Hospice RN
Location: Nationwide
12. Lawrence Merchandising Services
Industry: Retail merchandising
Sample job titles: Part-time merchandiser
Location: Nationwide
13. Orbital ATK
Industry: Aerospace Manufacturer
Sample job titles: Manufacturing Engineer, mechanical engineer, aerospace engineers
Location: Dulles, Va.; Chandler and Gilbert, Ariz.; Northridge, Calif.; Plymouth, Minn.; Luka, Miss.; Clearfield, Utah;
14. Penfed
Industry: Banking/financial services
Sample job titles: Credit card representative, branch support representative, IT security engineer
Location: Nebraska, Virginia, Oregon, Pennsylvania
15. PSA Healthcare
Industry: Pediatric home health
Sample job titles: Registered nurse, licensed practical nurse, licensed vocational nurse
Location: Georgia, Florida, Texas, Colorado, Illinois, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Louisiana, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Jersey, Washington
16. TMX Finance Family of Companies
Industry: Financial services
Sample job titles: Store manager, district manager, general manager, general manager trainee, customer service representative, bilingual customer service representative
Location: Nationwide
17. ULINE
Industry: Shipping and packaging/office supplies
Sample job titles: Customer service, distribution manager, director of talent acquisition, inside sales, IT, marketing, recruiters, supply chain, warehouse
Location: Nationwide
18. Whitlock
Industry: Computer software
Sample job titles: Sales representative, customer support, audiovisual systems programmer, on-site audiovisual service technician, field service technician
Location: Nationwide
19. WIS Intl.
Industry: Retail
Sample job titles: Inventory associate/counter, inventory supervisor, inventory manager, area manager, district manager
Location: Nationwide

How will Trump’s exit from the climate agreement impact job prospects?

Will President Trump's decision to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement mean sunnier or darker days ahead for U.S. job seekers?
On one hand, if you're a marine biologist studying the rapid decline of the Great Barrier Reef, you could experience solid job stability with high demand if Trump's decision helps keep the planet on pace to warm three degrees Celsius. On the other hand, if you're a solar energy system installer, your job prospects could be slimmer if the decision results in the continued use of fossil fuels. Or so it might seem.

In announcing his decision to leave the international effort to curb carbon emissions, Trump said that complying with the Paris Accord could cost America as many as 2.7 million lost jobs by 2025, citing research from the National Economic Research Associates (NERA). Several media reports, including The Washington Post's Fact Checker analysis, have since challenged that estimate of job losses, saying that Trump failed to disclose that the study "does not take into account potential benefits from avoided emissions. ... The model does not take into consideration yet-to-be developed technologies that might influence the long-term cost." The fact-checkers say Trump failed to balance the report's estimate of job losses with the potential job creation gains.
Trump and critics of the global treaty say exiting the agreement will actually spur jobs. But many experts say it will not, reported CBS News' Moneywatch. In reality, the renewable energy sector today is creating more jobs than fossil fuels – last year, more than twice as many people were employed in the solar sector than in coal mining, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. So, economists argue, sticking with fossil fuels has less potential for job growth, whereas shifting to a clean-energy economy has greater potential to boost employment.
Trump Critics: Exit Will Cost U.S. Jobs
Opponents of Trump's decision say withdrawing from the accord will lead to job losses.
California Gov. Jerry Brown told PBS that Trump's move is "going to cost jobs, not the reverse." He used his own state as an example of how environmentally based decisions can benefit the job market overall. While California has lost jobs, the net effect has been job gains of 2.4 million in last eight years, since the recession, and it was "driven by the clean tech investments and the climate action strategies," Brown said.
Shifting to Local Governments and Private Companies?
While the debate rages over whether the exit will cut or create jobs, there are some early indications that private companies and state and local governments are stepping up to fight climate change as the federal government steps out of the international effort. It remains unclear, however, how that would translate into job creation or job cuts, or if jobs could shift from the federal government to state and local governments or the private sector.
Just a day after Trump's decision, mayors from across the country pledged to work locally and to advocate nationally for reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. As part of the Mayors National Climate Action Agenda, they say that they cannot afford to sit back and do nothing while global warming threatens their cities by creating coastal erosion, rising sea levels, flooding, deadly heat waves and droughts and other problems.
A recent Mother Jones article chronicled how Trump's stance on climate change resulted in a job shift from a federal government position to a nonprofit one for one woman. Jane Zelikova was working as a scientist at the U.S. Department of Energy researching how big fossil-fuel industries can reduce greenhouse gas emissions when Trump was elected. After his budget slashed funding for science and research, she quit her Energy Department job and in July will start a job at a small nonprofit called the Center for Carbon Removal, based in Berkeley, California.
'We Can Be Ready to Go'
She predicts a shift from federal leadership to more state-based action, citing the same positive job growth that Gov. Brown noted. "Western states are perfectly poised to lead on climate action," she said. "In terms of federal action, there's going to be very little, so we need to work with states, so that when the political climate changes and there can be federal action, we can be ready to go."
Regardless of what the federal government does in the agreement, the media report that the private sector is shifting toward cleaner energy. Cheap natural gas and renewables will continue to drive the retirement of coal plants.
Twenty-five companies, including Apple, Google and Facebook had united to urge the president to stay in the accord, and many leaders of these companies took to Twitter following the decision to express their disappointment. Time will tell if they step up where the government no longer will lead.
"Disappointed with today's decision on the Paris Agreement," Jeff Immelt, chairman of General Electric Corp. tweeted. "Climate change is real. Industry must now lead and not depend on government."

3 careers beyond customer service specialist

Are you working as a customer service specialist? Are you knowledgeable about the products of your company, and always willing to bend over backward to please your customers? Luckily, career advancement is within your reach!

 














As much as you love your job, though, that doesn't mean you want to stay in your entry-level position for the rest of your life. Because your job at the forefront of the company puts you in touch with many other departments, you can learn about those departments and choose where you want to go. Once you decide, you can start honing your skills so you can step into one of the following jobs.

Customer Service Supervisor
If your co-workers often come to you for help, you've already taken the first step toward becoming a customer service supervisor. As a supervisor, you'll help train new customer service reps, step in when a customer service rep is having trouble answering a customer's questions, and help your team reach its goals. Your new job will come with an increased salary, too; the national average for this position is $35,000 for full-time workers. To reach this next phase of your career, work on the following skills:

Proficiency with computer programs, such as Microsoft Word and Excel

Written and verbal communication
Technical expertise in your field
To let your employer know that you're ready for a promotion, strive to go above and beyond the requirements of your current job. This doesn't mean you should overstep your authority, but you can make wise judgment calls that will streamline the customer service process and please both your boss and the customers you assist.
If a promotion seems a little too far away, reach out to CareerBuilder and start looking for open customer service supervisor positions in your area.

Customer Service Manager
After you've worked as a customer service supervisor for a time, you may be able to add another feather to your cap when you become a customer service manager. The national average salary is $46,000, which is over 30 percent more than customer service supervisors make!
Managers have a tougher job than supervisors. They have to keep an eye on a team of customer service reps, and they may have to deal with disciplinary issues. They may also play a key role in developing a company's customer service policy.
Does this sound like it would be a good fit for you? Continue to hone the skills that are important for a customer service supervisor, but keep in mind that you'll need even better credentials to land a job as a manager. Most often, you can work as a customer service specialist or a customer service supervisor without having any college education, but that usually isn't the case if you want to be a manager. A college degree may be necessary in order for you to land the job.
If becoming a full-time student isn't an option for you, consider enrolling in a certificate program that will enhance your skills. Take online or night classes that fit your schedule. You might want to study  
 business management, accounting, and topics that relate specifically to your industry. Keep an eye on customer service manager job openings, and study the job description in each posting to get a good feel for what different companies want from their managers.

Other Jobs to Explore
Your experience as a customer service specialist may also equip you for careers outside of customer service. For example, if you work for a retail store, you may become interested in things like the visual merchandising aspects of how to set up a store. If you really enjoy working with people, you might branch out into sales. When you take up the mantle of a salesperson, you might have the opportunity to earn a nice commission on the products you sell.
Regardless of what your career goals are, you should always be looking for opportunities to advance. Seek out chances to learn, welcome feedback, and be flexible. When you focus on the keys to career development, you're setting yourself up for success. Before you know it, you could be out of your cubicle and into an office of your very own!

Search This Blog

Followers