2014’s top occupations and metros for temporary employment growth

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Three machinists in workspace by machine talking

By Eric Gilpin, president of Staffing & Recruiting Group at CareerBuilder
In the short time since the economic recession, America’s workforce has changed in many ways. Many workers have sought higher education and certifications, some have switched industries to try out new careers, while others have discovered the benefits of being a temporary or contract worker. These different paths are not mutually exclusive; in fact, they often intersect.
In recent years, temporary employment has not only accelerated, but new data suggests its upward trajectory will continue throughout 2014. According to CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists Intl., more than 2.9 million U.S. workers were employed in temporary jobs in 2013, jumping 28 percent since 2010 and outpacing the 5 percent growth rate for all jobs. This is a hiring trend that employers are embracing for a number of reasons.

The appeal of temporary work
The boom in temporary workers is neither a mystery nor an isolated phenomenon. Companies want more flexibility in their respective workforces to quickly ramp up and ramp down their businesses as needed. Temporary workers provide that flexibility.
Temporary employment is growing across industries and metros, and the benefits of this flexibility isn’t only for the employer. Temporary and contract work provides great opportunities for workers to test-drive different work experiences as they explore new industries, put their new education and certifications into practice, and network with potential employers. For job seekers looking to bring variety to their search or those who may find a more compatible work life in temporary employment, this hiring trend can be the next big step in a career.
In a separate CareerBuilder and Harris Poll study, 42 percent of employers reported that they plan to hire temporary or contract workers in 2014, up from 40 percent last year.  Of these employers, two in five (43 percent) plan to transition some temporary employees into full-time, permanent staff.

The fastest growers
To see how these business needs may align with a job seeker’s, CareerBuilder and EMSI compiled a list of the fastest-growing occupations and metros for temporary employment in 2014, using EMSI’s extensive labor market database of over 90 national and state employment resources.
First, top occupations for growth in temporary employment were identified. Among occupations that pay in the middle-wage to high-wage range and are expected to see the greatest percentage increase for temporary job growth in 2014, are:
TOP OCCUPATIONS FOR GROWTH IN TEMPORARY EMPLOYMENT IN 2014
TOTAL TEMP JOBS 2013 TOTAL TEMP JOBS 2014 % CHANGE 2013-2014 MEDIAN EARNINGS PER HOUR1

HUMAN RESOURCES SPECIALISTS
61,642
64,049
4%
$26.83
CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVES
90,215
93,041
3%
$14.70
CONSTRUCTION LABORERS
72,914
75,183
3%
$14.42
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS2
69,398
71,573
3%
$15.58
REGISTERED NURSES
56,233
58,000
3%
$31.48
BOOKKEEPING, ACCOUNTING AND AUDITING CLERKS
29,326
30,257
3%
$16.91
MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR WORKERS, GENERAL
29,260
30,183
3%
$16.93
INSPECTORS, TESTERS, SORTERS, SAMPLERS AND WEIGHERS
27,305
28,178
3%
$16.57
HEAVY AND TRACTOR-TRAILER TRUCK DRIVERS
23,760
24,527
3%
$18.37
MACHINISTS
22,460
23,182
3%
$18.99
SALES REPRESENTATIVES, SERVICES, ALL OTHER3
22,300
22,984
3%
$24.45
COMPUTER USER SUPPORT SPECIALISTS
17,351
17,895
3%
$22.32

The top metropolitan areas for temp workers
Besides these specific occupations that are seeing a boon in temporary employment, there are metros across the country taking part in the hiring trend. The metropolitan statistical areas that employed at least 20,000 temporary workers in 2013 and are projected to have the greatest percentage increase for temporary job growth in 2014 are:
TOP METROS FOR GROWTH IN TEMPORARY EMPLOYMENT IN 2014 TOTAL TEMP JOBS 2013 TOTAL TEMP JOBS 2014 % CHANGE 2013-2014 2013 AVERAGE EARNINGS PER JOB
GRAND RAPIDS, MI 25,336
27,465
8%
$21,822
INDIANAPOLIS, IN 35,053
37,382
7%
$28,026
SEATTLE-TACOMA, WA 35,971
38,090
6%
$53,068
ORLANDO, FL 24,175
25,512
6%
$30,625
RIVERSIDE-SAN BERNARDINO, CA 34,811
36,610
5%
$24,304
MEMPHIS, TN 27,757
29,247
5%
$24,742
DETROIT, MI 51,438
53,622
4%
$39,778
PORTLAND, OR 23,500
24,334
4%
$37,577
CHICAGO, IL 157,839
162,113
3%
$31,743
LOS ANGELES, CA 140,927
144,993
3%
$33,620
DALLAS, TX 102,938
105,362
3%
$33,624
ATLANTA, GA 74,303
76,530
3%
$36,496

As this wide range of occupations and metros indicates, there are plenty of benefits to temporary employment, and job seekers will have many opportunities to share the rewards in this growing market.
Erik Gilpin is president of CareerBuilder’s Staffing & Recruiting Group.
1 Median earnings per hour covers anyone working in that occupation whether they are temporary or full-time, permanent staff
2 Full category name as defined by the BLS is Secretaries and Administrative Assistants, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive

3Sales Representatives, Services, All Other is a catch-all category that includes sales professionals who are not assigned to a specific category such as Insurance Sales Agents

Skills Spotlight: Sales and 9 Related Jobs

Everybody sells and these 9 jobs require good sales skills

image of a beautiful home in...

By Debra Auerbach

When you think of a sales job, you may automatically picture someone selling a physical product. And while many sales roles do look like that, being a good sales person can get you far in a variety of careers.

In fact, many jobs have some element of sales or selling to it, whether it's completely obvious or more subtle. Some jobs may require selling something to an external client, while others may entail selling a project or idea to an internal stakeholder.

Even a job that has nothing to do with sales may still require a little selling on your part - selling the reasons why you deserve that raise or promotion during your annual performance review.

Important qualities in sales
While having the right education and experience is important when pursuing sales-related roles, many people in sales rely on their soft skills to help them succeed at their job.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, some of the qualities good sales workers possess include:
Sales-related jobs
There are certain roles where having strong sales skills can be an advantage. These roles may not all overtly scream "sales," but the skills needed to work in sales are the same or similar to the skills required for these roles. If you have a sales background but want to cast a wider net in your job search, consider these 9 jobs* where sales skills can be transferable:

1. Customer service representatives handle customer complaints, process orders and provide information about an organization's products and services. Although selling is not their main job, some representatives may help to generate sales leads while providing information about a product or service.

2. Fundraisers organize events and campaigns to raise money and other donations for an organization. They may design promotional materials and increase awareness of an organization's work, goals and financial needs. Typical duties include researching prospective donors, creating a strong fundraising message that appeals to potential donors, identifying and contacting potential donors and organizing a campaign or event that will lead to soliciting donations.

3. Lawyers advise and represent individuals, businesses and government agencies on legal issues and disputes. They communicate with their clients and others and present facts in writing and verbally to their clients or others and argue on their behalf.

4. Models pose for artists, photographers or customers to help advertise a variety of products, including clothing, cosmetics, food and appliances. Duties typically include displaying clothing and merchandise in print and online advertisements; promoting products and services in television commercials; working closely with photographers, hair and clothing stylists, makeup artists and clients to produce a desired look; and creating and maintaining a portfolio of their work.

5. Personal financial advisers give financial advice to people. They help with investments, taxes and insurance decisions. Many personal financial advisers spend a lot of time marketing their services, and they meet potential clients by giving seminars or through business and social networking.

6. Public relations specialists create and maintain a favorable public image for the organization they represent. They design media releases to shape public perception of their organization and to increase awareness of its work and goals.

7. Recruiters find, screen and interview applicants for job openings in an organization. They search for applicants by posting listings, attending job fairs and visiting college campuses. They also may test applicants, contact references and extend job offers.

8. Scouts look for new players, evaluating their skills and likelihood for success at the college, amateur or professional level. In this role, scouts usually read newspapers and other news sources to find athletes to consider; attend games, view videotapes of the athletes' performances and study statistics about the athletes to determine talent and potential; talk to the athlete and the coaches to see if the athlete has what it takes to succeed; and arrange for and offer incentives to prospective players.

9. Travel agents sell transportation, lodging and admission to entertainment activities to individuals and groups planning trips. They offer advice on destinations, plan trip itineraries, and make travel arrangements for clients. 

Get fueled up: Jobs in diesel mechanics and technology

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When driving down the freeway, you’ll often pass trucks hauling various types of cargo. You may wonder what it takes to keep such high-powered machines running so they’re able to deliver their cargo on time and intact, no matter the distance. While it’s the driver who gets the truck from point A to point B, it’s the job of diesel service technicians and mechanics to make sure the ride goes off without a hitch. If the idea of working behind the scenes to help power diesel machines sounds interesting to you, read on to learn more about a career in diesel mechanics and technology.
Working as a diesel service mechanic and technician
If a vehicle has a diesel engine, diesel service mechanics and technicians are called upon to keep it in tip top shape. These workers are responsible for inspecting, repairing or overhauling buses, trucks, bulldozers, cranes and anything else with a diesel engine.*
Some of their daily tasks may include:
  • Test driving vehicles to diagnose malfunctions and ensure that they are running smoothly
  • Reading and interpreting diagnostic test results from diagnostic equipment
  • Raising trucks, buses and heavy parts or equipment by using hydraulic jacks or hoists
  • Inspecting brake systems, steering mechanisms, transmissions, engines and other vehicle parts
  • Conducting routine maintenance, such as changing oil, checking batteries and lubricating equipment and parts
  • Repairing or replacing faulty parts and other mechanical or electrical equipment
Using technology
Today, diesel mechanics and technicians need to use more than their hands to fix these powerful machines. Their jobs are becoming increasingly complex as engines and other components are being powered and controlled by electronic systems. For example, fuel injection and engine timing systems use microprocessors to maximize fuel efficiency and minimize harmful emissions. Workers often use computers to diagnose problems and adjust engine functions. Those interested in entering this field will need to learn not only how to use hand and high-powered tools, but also computer systems that are essential to engine operation.
Entering the field
While many diesel mechanics and technicians learn their trade on the job, many employers require at least a high-school diploma or equivalent. In fact, according to Economic Modeling Specialists Intl., 49 percent of workers in this field have attained a high-school or similar level of education. Increasingly, employers are attracted to workers who also have postsecondary training in an area such as diesel engine repair.
Workers may also earn a certification from the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence. Although obtaining a certification isn’t required to work in this field, it increases a diesel mechanic’s value to employers and clients. To earn certification, mechanics must have at least two years of work experience and pass one or more ASE exams. To remain certified, they must take and pass the test again every five years.
Diesel mechanics and technicians – by the numbers

  • Employment growth: The occupation is projected to grow steadily over the next couple of years. According to EMSI, 239,666 workers are employed as bus and truck mechanics and diesel engine specialists today. By 2016, the occupation will grow by 2.1 percent, to 244,664.
  • Earnings: EMSI notes that bus and truck mechanics and diesel engine specialists earn a median hourly wage of $20.35 an hour.
  • Educational programs: In 2012, 9,294 people graduated with a degree in a program related to this occupation, according to EMSI. Eight thousand, six hundred and thirty four graduated from a Diesel Mechanics Technology/Technician program, while 660 graduates took part in a Medium/Heavy Vehicle and Truck Technology/Technician program.

The 20 Highest-Paying Jobs You Can Do From Home

These jobs can earn up to $112 hourly


beautiful young woman working...

By Derek Baer

U.S. businesses will spend half a billion dollars hiring remote freelance workers in 2014.

"The growth is a clear indicator of a transition of work online," says Fabio Rosati, CEO of Elance-oDesk.

The company's platform - which serves as a broker between companies that need skills and freelancers eager to supply them - sees 2.7 million freelance jobs posted a year. According to Elance-oDesk, the total earnings of freelancers have grown 50% compounded annually over the past five years.

From Rosati's perspective, so many businesses are hiring these workers because they need work done on demand, typically for a short stint. In those cases, a marketplace like Elance-oDesk becomes like the Amazon Prime for jobs. It's a win for both the employer, who can hire on an as-needed basis, and for the worker, who has flexibility of schedule and location.

What's more, freelancers with the right skills can earn a great living from the comfort of their homes, if the highest-paying freelance jobs are any indicator.

The wage numbers below come from the combined databases of Elance.com and oDesk.com, pulling from Jan. 1 to May 31 of this year.

Skills spotlight: Logistics and 12 related jobs

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logistics

People, goods and raw materials rarely stay in one place for long. To coordinate those transportation needs, we turn to the industry of logistics, materials and supply chain management to keep a global economy and the people within it moving.
According to an Economic Modeling Specialists Intl. 2014.2 Class of Worker dataset, the logistics, materials and supply chain management industry is responsible for a lot: managing and coordinating all logistical functions in an enterprise — ranging from acquisitions to receiving and handling, through internal allocation of resources to operations units, to the handling and delivery of output. It also includes instruction in acquisitions and purchasing, inventory control, storage and handling, just-in-time manufacturing, logistics planning, shipping and delivery management, transportation, quality control, resource estimation and allocation and budgeting.
Suffice to say, those who work in logistics have a very strong set of skills, which the Bureau of Labor Statistics elaborates on:

Important qualities for logistics
  • Interpersonal skills
  • Leadership skills
  • Problem-solving skills
  • Time-management skills
  • Customer-service skills
  • Hand-eye coordination
  • Math skills
  • Patience
  • Sales skills
  • Speaking ability
  • Visual ability
  • Communication skills
  • Concentration skills
  • Decision-making skills
  • Organizational skills
  • Critical-thinking skills
  • Alertness
  • Dexterity
  • Mechanical skills
  • Visual ability
And to apply those skills, consider any of these 12 related positions within the industry:
1. Industrial production managers* oversee the daily operations of manufacturing and related plants. They coordinate, plan and direct the activities used to create a wide range of goods, such as cars, computer equipment or paper products.
2. Air traffic controllers coordinate the movement of air traffic, to ensure that aircraft stay safe distances apart. Among their responsibilities, air traffic controllers typically issue landing and takeoff instructions to pilots and monitor and direct the movement of aircraft on the ground and in the air, using radar, computers or visual references.
3. Delivery truck drivers and driver/sales workers pick up, transport and drop off packages and small shipments within a local region or urban area. They drive trucks with a gross vehicle weight — the combined weight of the vehicle, passengers and cargo — of 26,000 pounds or less. Most of the time, delivery truck drivers transport merchandise from a distribution center to businesses and households.
4. Logisticians analyze and coordinate an organization’s supply chain — the system that moves a product from supplier to consumer. They manage the entire life cycle of a product, which includes how a product is acquired, distributed, allocated and delivered.
5. Material moving machine operators use machinery to transport various objects. Some operators move construction materials around building sites or the land around a mine. Others move goods around a warehouse or onto container ships.
6. Industrial truck and tractor operators drive trucks and tractors that move materials around warehouses, storage yards or worksites. These trucks, often called forklifts, have a lifting mechanism and forks, which makes them useful for moving heavy and large objects. Some industrial truck and tractor operators drive tractors that pull trailers loaded with material around factories or storage areas.
7. Excavating and loading machine and dragline operators use machines equipped with scoops or shovels. They dig sand, earth or other materials and load them onto conveyors or into trucks for transport elsewhere. They also may move material within a confined area, such as a construction site. Operators typically receive instructions from workers on the ground through hand signals or radios. Most of these operators work in construction or mining industries.
8. Dredge operators excavate waterways. They operate equipment on the water to remove sand, gravel or rock from harbors or lakes to help prevent erosion and improve trade. Removing these materials helps maintain navigable waterways and allows larger ships to use more ports. Operators also measure the water depth, as well as how much they will be excavating. Dredging is also used to help restore wetlands and maintain beaches.
9. Crane and tower operators use tower and cable equipment to lift and move materials, machinery or other heavy objects. Operators extend and retract horizontal arms and lower and raise hooks attached to cables at the end of their crane or tower. Operators are usually guided by other workers on the ground using hand signals or a radio. Most crane and tower operators work at construction sites or major ports, where they load and unload cargo. Some also work in iron and steel mills.
10. Hoist and winch operators, also called derrick operators or hydraulic boom operators, control the movement of platforms, cables and cages that transport workers or materials for industrial operations, such as constructing a high-rise building. Many of these operators raise platforms far above the ground. Operators regulate the speed of the equipment based on the needs of the workers. Most work in manufacturing or construction industries.
11. Conveyor operators and tenders control conveyor systems that move materials on an automatic belt. They move materials to and from places such as building sites, storage areas and vehicles. They monitor sensors on the conveyor to regulate the speed with which the conveyor belt moves. Operators may determine the route materials take along a conveyor based on shipping orders.

12. Locomotive engineers drive freight or passenger trains between stations. They drive long-distance trains and commuter trains, but not subway trains. Most locomotive engineers drive diesel-electric engines, although some drive locomotives powered by battery or electricity.

Companies hiring in June

By Susan Ricker

Companies hiring in June
Summer has arrived, and with it, plenty of job opportunities for those interested in temporary and permanent positions, both full-time and part-time.
And while you may be tempted to soak up the sun or hit the road for summer fun, don’t let your job search wither away. Even casual searching is still progress, and CareerBuilder tools like our mobile site or tablet site have been optimized to give your screen the best results to power your job search forward. In fact, check out these insider tricks and tools for applying to a position using a mobile device. You may find yourself more productive poolside than inside.

If you’d like a new job to be included in your summer plans, check out these companies hiring in June.
1. Appen
Industry:
Web search evaluation
Sample job titles:
Crowd sourcing, web search evaluation, onsite administrative supervisor
Location:
Global (work from home)
2. Berks & Beyond
Industry:
Logistics, manufacturing
Sample job titles:
Entry-level opportunities, forklift operator, welder, assembly, general labor
Location:
Pennsylvania
3. Employee Solutions
Industry:
Light industrial
Sample job titles:
CNC operator, forklift operator, assembler, telesales, welder
Location:
Tulsa and Muskogee, Okla.; Austin, Dallas and Houston, Texas
4. EMSI: Examination Management Services, Inc.
Industry:
Health care/insurance
Sample job titles:
Individual life and health underwriter, director of operations, case manager
Location:
Nationwide
5. Freedom Financial Network
Industry:
Finance
Sample job titles:
Account executive, QA engineer, front end developer, java developer
Location:
Tempe, Ariz. and San Mateo, Calif.
6. Heartland Dental
Industry:
Health care
Sample job titles:
Dental assistant, dental hygienist, business/office assistant, dentist
Location:
Nationwide
7. LHC Group
Industry:
Health care
Sample job titles:
Registered nurse, LVN, home health aide, home health sales representative, occupational therapist, physical therapist, speech language pathologist, director of nursing
Location:
Nationwide
8. St. Francis Hospital, Inc.
Industry:
Health care
Sample job titles:
Sterile processing technician, residential care assistant, registered nurse, physical therapist, environmental services specialist, physician assistant, transporter, case manager, multi-care technician, medical coding specialist, accountant
Location:
Columbus, Ga.

9. Staffing Plus
Industry:
Behavioral health, allied health, nursing, pharmacy
Sample job titles:
Teacher assistant, therapeutic staff support, occupational therapist, physical therapist, recruiter, lead clinician, speech language pathologist
Location:
Maryland, Pennsylvania

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