7 Jobs That Pay $70 an Hour or More

Dentists, petroleum engineers, CEOs and more

Dentist and his assistante smiling at camera...perspective of a patient on a dentist chair
Getty Images
By Debra Auerbach

We all know the saying, "Money can't buy you happiness." But if you were making $70 an hour-plus (about $146,000 a year), you'd probably be pretty content -- at least with your salary. Those that make this much money an hour are mostly in medical professions -- physicians, dentists, surgeons and the like -- but there are a few other nonmedical-occupations that can earn such hefty salaries as well.

Want to know which jobs will get you a lucrative $70 an hour or more and what schooling you'll need to get them? Read on to find out.

1. Chief executives devise strategies and policies to ensure that an organization meets its goals. They plan, direct and coordinate the operational activities of companies and public or private-sector organizations.*

Typical education level: Bachelor's or master's degree in business administration
Average hourly wage: $85.02

2. Dentists (general) diagnose and treat problems with a patient's teeth, gums and other parts of the mouth. They provide advice and instruction on taking care of teeth and gums and on diet choices that affect oral health.

Typical education level: Doctoral or professional degree
Average hourly wage: $78.48

3. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons operate on the mouth, jaws, teeth, gums, neck and head, including procedures such as surgically repairing a cleft lip and palate or removing impacted teeth.

Typical education level: Doctoral or professional degree
Average hourly wage: $104.06

4. Orthodontists design and make appliances, such as braces, to realign teeth and jaws to produce and maintain normal function and to improve appearance.

Typical education level: Doctoral or professional degree
Average hourly wage: $89.58

5. Petroleum engineers design and develop methods for extracting oil and gas from deposits below the earth's surface. Petroleum engineers also find new ways to extract oil and gas from older wells.

Typical education level: Bachelor's degree
Average hourly wage: $70.90

6. Physicians and surgeons diagnose and treat injuries and illnesses in patients. Physicians examine patients, take medical histories, prescribe medications and order, perform and interpret diagnostic tests. Surgeons operate on patients to treat injuries, diseases and deformities.

Typical education level: Doctoral or professional degree
Average hourly wage: $88.86

7. Prosthodontists construct oral prostheses to replace missing teeth and other oral structures to correct natural and acquired deformation of the mouth and jaw, to restore and maintain oral function, such as chewing and speaking, and to improve appearance.

Typical education level: Doctoral or professional degree
Average hourly wage: $80.83

8 second careers to consider

There are plenty of reasons to consider a second career. You could be burnt out in your current job. Perhaps you have transferable skills that you'd like to bring to a new industry. You might be moving to a location where your current job is in short supply. Or maybe you're just interested in something new. Whatever the reason, a well-prepared transition to a second career can revitalize your professional life.

So what's the first step to take when exploring a second career? "When considering a second career and your transferable skills, think about your experience from a broader perspective," says Jessica Campbell, human resources manager at Voices.com. "What kinds of skills did you acquire in your previous position -- like interpersonal, communication and organizational skills -- that you could use anywhere? These are the types of skills that can be transferred to a second career."

Also learn about what opportunities are out there before you take the plunge. "Before considering a second career, please do your research," Campbell adds. "There is nothing more disappointing and defeating than putting your time, energy and money into an educational or skills path that does not result in a job for you in the end because there are no jobs to be had. There are some job markets that are so saturated with new graduates and existing workers that there is no hope for full-time work, or in some instances, even casual work. Talk to people who are already working in the career you are thinking of pursuing, as they will be your strongest assets when deciding on a career and career path."

If you're ready for a second career, you may find luck with any of the following eight occupations. These jobs require varying levels of education and experience, but all are predicted to grow at a fast pace over the next several years.

1. Home health and personal care aides help people who are disabled, chronically ill or cognitively impaired. They also help older adults who may need assistance. They help with activities such as bathing and dressing, and they provide services such as light housekeeping.
Typical education requirement: Less than high school
Job outlook, 2010-20: 70 percent (much faster than average**)
Median annual pay: $20,170
2. Interpreters and translators convert information from one language to another. Interpreters work in spoken or sign language, translators in written language.

Typical education requirement: Bachelor's degree
Job outlook, 2010-20: 42 percent (much faster than average)
Median annual pay: $43,300
3. Market research analysts study market conditions in local, regional or national areas to examine potential sales of a product or service. They help companies understand what products people want, who will buy them and at what price.

Typical education requirement: Bachelor's degree
Job outlook, 2010-20: 41 percent (much faster than average)
Median annual pay: $60,570
4. Meeting, convention and event planners coordinate all aspects of professional meetings and events. They choose meeting locations, arrange transportation and coordinate other details.

Typical education requirement: Bachelor's degree
Job outlook, 2010-20: 44 percent (much faster than average)
Median annual pay: $45,260
5. Occupational therapy assistants and aides work under the direction of occupational therapists in treating patients with injuries, illnesses or disabilities through the therapeutic use of everyday activities. They help these patients develop, recover and improve the skills needed for daily living and working.

Typical education requirement: Associate degree
Job outlook, 2010-20: 41 percent (much faster than average)
Median annual pay: $47,490
6. Physical therapists help people who have injuries or illnesses improve their movement and manage their pain. They are often an important part of rehabilitation and treatment of patients with chronic conditions or injuries.

Typical education requirement: Doctoral or professional degree
Job outlook, 2010-20: 39 percent (much faster than average)
Median annual pay: $76,310
7. Physical therapist assistants and aides work under the direction of physical therapists. They help patients who are recovering from injuries, illnesses and surgeries regain movement and manage pain.

Typical education requirement: Associate degree
Job outlook, 2010-20: 45 percent (much faster than average)
Median annual pay: $37,710
8. Secretaries and administrative assistants perform routine clerical and organizational tasks. They organize files, draft messages, schedule appointments and support other staff.

Typical education requirement: High school diploma or equivalent
Job outlook, 2010-20: 12 percent (about as fast as average)
Median annual pay: $34,660

6 technology jobs in health care

tech hc jobsHealth care is a reliably strong industry, since people will always need access to doctors, nurses and health resources. And it’s no surprise that mobile and wireless technology jobs have saturated many industries in the 21st century. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment in computer systems design and related services is projected to grow 3.9 percent annually from 2010 to 2020, compared with 1.3 percent of all industries.
When you combine the growth of the technology industry with the strength of the health care industry, a number of jobs become available. A CareerBuilder and MiracleWorkers.com survey found that health care employers are searching for workers to fill jobs tied to health informatics, cloud technology, social media, managing and interpreting big data, mobile technology and financial regulation. In a sector increasingly reliant on technology and communication, workers able to fill these roles will be highly sought after.

Here are six jobs that combine technology and health care:
1. Cloud technology
In a recent Washington Post article, “Analysts expect growth in cloud jobs,” Mohana Ravindranath writes about the growing demand for cloud technology workers. She writes, “A January report sponsored by Microsoft from the International Data Corporation showed more than 1.7 million jobs related to cloud computing were unfilled worldwide at the end of 2012.” Workers are needed to fill these jobs, which allow medical information to be easily shared between hospitals and other health care organizations.
2. Financial regulation
Workers in jobs tied to financial regulation are primarily responsible for managing and monitoring finances within the health care industry.* Occupations may include accountants and auditors, who prepare and examine financial records; budget analysts, who help organize finances; and financial examiners, who ensure compliance with laws governing financial regulations and transactions. While these jobs also exist outside of health care, they are necessary to the industry and are using new financial regulation technology to keep hospitals and other facilities operating efficiently.
3. Health informatics
Many health organizations are transitioning to digital systems from paper records. Medical records and health information technicians are responsible for managing health information data by ensuring its quality, accuracy, accessibility and security in both paper and electronic systems. They use various classification systems to code and categorize patient information for reimbursement purposes, for databases and registries and to maintain patients’ medical and treatment histories.
4. Managing and interpreting big data
A recent New York Times article by Steve Lohr, “Sizing up big data, broadening beyond the Internet,” addresses the new function of big data. He writes, “Big Data is the shorthand label for the phenomenon, which embraces technology, decision-making and public policy. Supplying the technology is a fast-growing market, increasing at more than 30 percent a year and likely to reach $24 billion by 2016, according to a forecast by IDC, a research firm.” He goes on to say, “Demand is brisk for people with data skills. The McKinsey Global Institute, the research arm of the consulting firm, projects that the United States needs 140,000 to 190,000 more workers with ‘deep analytical’ expertise and 1.5 million more data-literate managers, whether retrained or hired, by 2020.” Hospitals and health organizations can benefit from the breadth of data available and find practical applications such as gaining insight about patient behavior, budget regularities, treatment success and the preferences and needs of patients and their families.
5. Mobile technology
In an interview with the National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health, NIH director Dr. Francis S. Collins speaks on the trending use of mobile technology in the health care industry. The NLM recently launched a mobile format of its resource Medline Plus. Dr. Collins says, “Users have instant access to summaries of over 800 diseases, conditions and wellness issues; a full medical encyclopedia; lots of diagrams, images and pictures; drug information; news stories; a medical dictionary; and a powerful search engine. It is a mobile-optimized website, accessible from any platform, including basic flip phones, iPhones and Androids. That’s just one of the concrete ways we are trying to bring medical information to the public.”
6. Social media
Many health care organizations are embracing the use of social media to connect with employees, patients and other stakeholders. Hospitals and other health organizations use social media and blogs to share new technologies and treatment options available to patients, as well as news and success stories. Because of this, common social media positions such as bloggers, online community managers and social media planners are needed in the health care industry.

8 Blue-Collar Jobs That Pay Surprisingly Well

These 8 manual occupations pay more than $55,000 a year

workers were cutting tracks for ...
Shutterstock
By Alison Griswold

Think there's no money in manual labor or unskilled technical work? Think again.

As it turns out, there are more options than you might expect. We combed through data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics to find blue-collar jobs with median annual salaries that are surprisingly high.

The following occupations rival many white-collar jobs in annual pay, each earning well above the U.S. median annual household income of $51,371 in 2012.

8. Signal and track switch repairers

Median annual pay: $55,450

Job description: Install, inspect, and repair the equipment involved in signaling and communication systems for the railroad.

How to become one: Most positions require an associate's degree or some college education, though a small number will take just a high school diploma.

7. Petroleum pump system operators, refinery operators, and gaugers

Median annual pay: $60,730

Job description: These workers control petroleum refining and processing systems, often with different specialties that determine the specifics of their work.

How to become one: This job requires a high school diploma and either an apprenticeship or relevant experience.

Find a job now as a petroleum pump system operator or refinery operator.

6. Subway or streetcar operators

Median annual pay: $62,730

Job description: Subway and streetcar operators transport passengers in cities and suburbs. Usually they operate vehicles on above-ground or underground tracks, or on streets.

How to become one: Several months of on-the-job training and a high school diploma are usually required for this job.

Find a job now as a subway or streetcar operator.

5. Electrical power-line installers and repairers

Median annual pay: $63,250

Job description: Electrical power-line installers and repairers are responsible for installing and repairing the wiring used in electrical power systems. This can include building poles and transmission towers.

How to become one: Some positions involve formal apprenticeships, and almost all require a lengthy period of on-the-job training.

Find a job now as an electrical power-line installer or repairer.
Construction WIP
Alamy

4. Transportation inspectors

Median annual pay: $63,680

Job description: Transportation inspectors examine everything from freight and rail vehicles, to the cargo being carried in different transportation devices.

How to become one: Many jobs require only a high school diploma, and typically want some relevant experience.

Find a job now as a transportation inspector.

3. Electrical and electronics repairers, powerhouse, substation, and relay

Median annual pay: $68,810

Job description: Test, repair, maintain, and inspect electrical equipment in generators, substations, in-service relays, and other types of facilities.

How to become one: The training can involve an apprenticeship and usually requires some college or associate's degree.

Find a job now as an electrical and electronics repairer, powerhouse, substation, or relay.

2. Elevator installers and repairers

Median annual pay: $76,650

Job description: Elevator workers repair, install, assemble, and maintain various types of elevators, freight lifts, escalators, and dumbwaiters.

How to become one: Some states require a license, and almost all installers and repairers learn the job through a formal apprenticeship.

Find a job now as an elevator installer.

1. Power distributors and dispatchers

Median annual pay: $83,034

Job description: Power plant distributors and dispatchers work with electric power systems, which can involve a range of tasks.

How to become one: Some positions require a license or a background check, and most applicants need some education and previous experience.

The 15 Most Dangerous Jobs In America

Jobs are available in these industries, but death rates are higher


Peru Miners TrappedAP
Ten percent of Americans can't find a job, but that doesn't mean there aren't jobs out there. They're just not the kind of jobs most Americans want.

We've got a list of the 15 most dangerous jobs from the BLS.

If you're not afraid of getting trapped in a mine or climbing 1,700-foot broadcast towers without safety cords, then go get yourself a job.

15. Grounds maintenance workers

12 fatalities per 100,000

160 fatalities in 2007
Falls are a common cause of death.

$14/hr is the average wage.

Find a job now as a grounds maintenance worker.

14. Helpers, construction trades

13.7 fatalities per 100,000

18 fatalities in 2007

Falls are a common cause of death.

$15/hr is the average wage.

Find a job now as a helper in construction trades.

13. Firefighters

17.4 fatalities per 100,000

50 fatalities in 2007

Fires and explosions are common causes of death.

Wage information was not available.

Find a job now as a firefighter.

12. Construction laborers

19.5 fatalities per 100,000

345 fatalities in 2007

Falls are a common cause of death.

$16/hr is the average wage.

Find a job now as a construction laborer.

11. Taxi drivers and chauffeurs

21.3 fatalities per 100,000

50 fatalities in 2007

Assaults and violent acts are common causes of death.

$12/hr is the average wage.

Find a job now as a taxi drivers or as a chauffeur.

Policewomen pulling over man in convertible
Getty Images

10. Police and sheriff's patrol officers

21.8 fatalities per 100,000

146 fatalities in 2007

Transportation incidents are a common cause of death.

Wage information is not available.

Find a job now as a police or sheriff's patrol officer.

9. Refuse and recyclable material collectors

22.8 fatalities per 100,000

18 fatalities in 2007

Transportation incidents are a common cause of death.

$17/hr is the average wage.

Find a job now as a refuse and recyclable material collector.

8. Driver/sales workers and truck drivers

28.2 fatalities per 100,000

976 fatalities in 2007

Transportation incidents are a common cause of death.

$12/hr is the average wage.

Find a job now as a driver/sales worker or truck driver.

7. Electrical power-line installers and repairers

29.1 fatalities per 100,000

30 fatalities in 2007

Exposure to harmful substances or environments is a common cause of death.

$22/hr is the average wage.

Find a job now as an electrical power-line installer or repairer.

6. Roofers

29.4 fatalities per 100,000

79 fatalities in 2007

Falls are a common cause of death.

$16/hr is the average wage.

Find a job now as a roofer.
Michigan St African Farming
AP


5. Farmers and ranchers

39.5 fatalities per 100,000

293 fatalities in 2007

Transportation incidents are a common cause of death.

Wage information was not available.

Find a job now as a farmer or rancher.

4. Structural iron and steel workers

45.5 fatalities per 100,000

40 fatalities in 2007

Contact with objects and equipment is a common cause of death.

$19/hr is the average wage.

Find a job now as a structural iron or steel worker.

3. Aircraft pilots and flight engineers

70.7 fatalities per 100,000

87 fatalities in 2007

Transportation incidents are a common cause of death.

Wage information was not available.

Find a job now as a aircraft pilot or flight engineer.

2. Logging workers

86.4 fatalities per 100,000

76 fatalities in 2007

Contact with objects and equipment is a common cause of death.

$13/hr is the average wage.

Find a job now as a logging worker.

1. Fishers and related fishing workers

111.8 fatalities per 100,000

38 fatalities in 2008

Transportation incidents are a common cause of death.

$13/hr is the average wage.

Find a job now as a fisher and related fishing workers.

New study reveals fastest-growing occupations through 2017

slicedintro_05new
Eleven million Americans are currently looking for work, yet 45 percent of human resources managers say they are unable to find qualified candidates for their open positions. For job seekers, this might not make sense; for HR managers, it all comes down to who has the right qualifications right now. This skills gap is a growing problem for employers and workers alike, but it can be overcome.
In “The Talent Equation,” a new book by Matt Ferguson (CEO of CareerBuilder), Lorin Hitt (Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania) and Prasanna Tambe (Stern School, New York University), issues such as the labor market’s skills gap challenge are explored, as well as how big data has the potential to transform human resources.

What job seekers can do
HR managers, eager to fill vacant positions and keep their businesses productive and profitable, have to decide between taking longer to find an ideal candidate and investing their resources into reskilling or educating an applicant who has some, but not all, of the necessary skills. According to research from the book, 8 in 10 employers express concern over an emerging skills gap, but only 4 in 10 say their company is doing anything to alleviate it.
Where does this leave job seekers?
While employers decide how they’re going to overcome the skills gap from a hiring standpoint, job seekers can take steps to find the right roles. For example, jobs that are projected to grow the most in the coming years are high-wage occupations, and jobs require associate, bachelor’s and master’s degrees will all outpace jobs requiring short-term, on-the-job training. Job seekers might want to consider additional education or certifications to align themselves with these growing positions, which are in demand today and will be in the future.

The fastest-growing occupations
As employers find better ways to recruit, provide workers with more training opportunities and narrow the skills gap, more job seekers will be able to find roles in which they can be successful.  Knowing which occupations have a bright outlook can further help job seekers focus their career.
A new report from CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists Intl. on the projected fastest-growing occupations in the U.S. from 2013 to 2017 can give job seekers the direction they need. “Projections provide an important look at the future of the labor market, and can be used to spot emerging trends that have implications for students and job seekers, as well as businesses and economic planners,” Ferguson says. “Barring any major shocks to the economy, the short-term job outlook in the United States will likely continue developments seen during the recovery — specifically, significant growth for jobs that require a college education and occupations in health care, energy and technology.”

The following list, adapted from the report, spotlights the fastest-growing occupations that are projected to see at least 8 percent growth and 30,000 jobs added from 2013 through 2017:
1. Personal care & home health aides
Projected growth: 21 percent
New jobs: 473,965
Median hourly earnings: $9.77
2. Market research analysts & marketing specialists
Projected growth: 14 percent
New jobs: 60,889
Median hourly earnings: $29.10
3. Medical secretaries 
Projected growth: 14 percent
New jobs: 76,386
Median hourly earnings: $15.17
4. Emergency medical technicians & paramedics
Projected growth: 13 percent
New jobs: 30,234
Median hourly earnings: $15.28
5. Software developers (systems & applications)
Projected growth: 11 percent
New jobs: 110,049
Median hourly earnings: $47.64
6. Medical assistants
Projected growth: 10 percent
New jobs: 60,109
Median hourly earnings: $14.35
7. Registered nurses
Growth: 9 percent
New jobs: 256,703
Median hourly earnings: $32.04
8. Network & computer systems administrators
Growth: 9 percent
New jobs: 34,825
Median hourly earnings: $35.14
9. Pharmacy technicians
Growth: 9 percent
New jobs: 31,975
Median hourly earnings: $14.29
10. Landscaping & groundskeeping workers
Growth: 9 percent
New jobs: 111,444
Median hourly earnings: $11.07
11. Social & human service assistants
Growth: 9 percent
New jobs: 34,411
Median hourly earnings: $14.02
12. Computer systems analysts
Growth: 8 percent
New jobs: 40,462
Median hourly earnings: $37.98
13. Management analysts  
Growth: 8 percent
New jobs: 60,157
Median hourly earnings: $35.80
14. Cooks, restaurant
Growth: 8 percent
New jobs: 79,364
Median hourly earnings: $10.63
15. Insurance sales agents
Growth: 8 percent
New jobs: 52,565
Median hourly earnings: $23.20
16. Nursing assistants
Growth: 8 percent
New jobs: 117,400
Median hourly earnings: $12.01
17. Licensed practical & licensed vocational nurses
Growth: 8 percent
New jobs: 63,320
Median hourly earnings: $20.33
18. Combined food prep & serving, incl. fast food
Growth: 8 percent
New jobs: 237,192
Median hourly earnings: $8.75
19. Receptionists & information clerks
Growth: 8 percent
New jobs: 85,035
Median hourly earnings: $12.64

19 Fastest Growing Occupations

These are the jobs that will see explosive growth by 2017

Health Overhaul
AP
The future of the jobs market currently looks bleak. The unemployment rate has been stuck above 7 percent since December 2008, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. And as futurist Thomas Frey recently told AOL Jobs, half of all the jobs in existence today will no longer be around by 2030.

But so much upheaval is also helping to create new jobs and opportunities. In fact, opportunities abound, but it's been widely noted that America's workers simply don't have the proper training to get the job done. As Matt Ferguson, the CEO of CareerBuilder, wrote in his just-released book, "The Talent Equation," 45 percent of human resource managers say they "can't find qualified candidates for open positions." (CareerBuilder is an AOL Jobs partner.)

Ferguson, for his part, said in a CareerBuilder news release that he's confident that "barring any major shocks to the economy, the short-term job outlook in the United States will likely continue developments seen during the recovery -- specifically, significant growth for jobs that require a college education and occupations in health care, energy and technology."

So what are these jobs? Working in conjunction with the Economic Modeling Specialists Intl., CareerBuilder has put together a report featuring the jobs that are expected to see at least 8 percent growth and 30,000 new positions created between 2013 and 2017. Those opportunities can be viewed below.


Projected growth: 21 percent
New jobs: 473,965
Median hourly earnings: $9.77

Find a job now as a personal care or home health aide.


Projected growth: 14 percent
New jobs: 60,889
Median hourly earnings: $29.10



Projected growth: 14 percent
New jobs: 76,386
Median hourly earnings: $15.17

Find a job now as a medical secretary.


Projected growth: 13 percent
New jobs: 30,234
Median hourly earnings: $15.28

Find a job now as an emergency medical technician or paramedic.


Projected growth: 11 percent
New jobs: 110,049
Median hourly earnings: $47.64

Find a job now as a software developer.


Projected growth: 10 percent
New jobs: 60,109
Median hourly earnings: $14.35

Find a job now as a medical assistant.


Growth: 9 percent
New jobs: 256,703
Median hourly earnings: $32.04

Find a job now as a registered nurse.


Growth: 9 percent
New jobs: 34,825
Median hourly earnings: $35.14



Growth: 9 percent
New jobs: 31,975
Median hourly earnings: $14.29

Find a job now as a pharmacy technician.


Growth: 9 percent
New jobs: 111,444
Median hourly earnings: $11.07



Growth: 9 percent
New jobs: 34,411
Median hourly earnings: $14.02



Growth: 8 percent
New jobs: 40,462
Median hourly earnings: $37.98

Find a job now as a computer systems analyst.


Growth: 8 percent
New jobs: 60,157
Median hourly earnings: $35.80

Find a job now as a management analyst.


Growth: 8 percent
New jobs: 79,364
Median hourly earnings: $10.63

Find a job now as a restaurant cook.


Growth: 8 percent
New jobs: 52,565
Median hourly earnings: $23.20

Find a job now as a insurance sales agent.


Growth: 8 percent
New jobs: 117,400
Median hourly earnings: $12.01

Find a job now as a nursing assistant.


Growth: 8 percent
New jobs: 63,320
Median hourly earnings: $20.33



Growth: 8 percent
New jobs: 237,192
Median hourly earnings: $8.75

Find a job now in fast food prep.


Growth: 8 percent
New jobs: 85,035
Median hourly earnings: $12.64

Find a job now as a receptionists or as an information clerk.

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