10 Best Cities To Find A Job In 2013


best cities job seekers Choosing whether to relocate for work is rarely an easy decision. And that's particularly true if you're not quite sure where to move to or haven't yet landed a job. How to make it easier in this tough economy? Focus on places where job seekers are having an easier time finding employment.
Personal-finance website NerdWallet has done just that, examining data from the U.S. Census Bureau and the Council For Community and Economic Research to find the fastest-growing cities for those seeking employment. NerdWallet then ranked 26 U.S. cities based on four factors: population growth, income, unemployment rate and cost-of-living.
The top 10 winners are shown below. Check them out and tell us what you think.


  1. Charlotte, N.C.
  • Median annual salary: $31,910.
  • Unemployment rate: 9.2 percent.
  • Median rent (for a two-bedroom apartment, monthly): $790.

NerdWallet credits Charlotte's upsurge in population, moderately high salaries and low cost-of-living for making this Southern city an ideal destination for job seekers. Major industries include banking, motor sports and defense.



  1. San Antonio
  • Median annual salary: $31,667.
  • Unemployment rate: 7.4 percent.
  • Median rent: $823.

San Antonio's relatively low unemployment rate and low cost-of-living make it a better option than many cities for job-seekers, NerdWallet says. Growing industries here include cyber security and information technology, with more than 80 companies in the city focused on those sectors. Other big employers include financial services, health care and defense, which employs nearly 90,000 people.



  1. Seattle
  • Median annual salary: $41,695.
  • Unemployment rate: 7.5 percent.
  • Median rent: $1,417.

With no shortage of high-tech employers, such as Microsoft Corp. and Amazon.com Inc., Seattle remains a strong draw for many job seekers. The high cost-of-living, reflected in rents that are higher than many other cities on this list, are offset by higher median income and relatively low unemployment. Health care is another big employer of Seattleites, providing jobs to 20 percent of the city's workforce.



  1. Dallas
  • Median annual salary: $27,251.
  • Unemployment rate: 8.5 percent.
  • Median rent: $792.

Dallas' primary draw for job hunters includes a low cost-of-living, especially compared to similarly sized cities. But its unemployment rate is slightly higher than other Texas cities on this list and salaries are on the low side. Still, NerdWallet says, a wealth of jobs in the tech and telecommunications sectors make the Big D worthy considering should you be relocating to find employment.



  1. Fort Worth
  • Median annual salary: $24,270.
  • Unemployment rate: 8 percent.
  • Median rent: $980.

As with other Texas cities on this list, Fort Worth's high rank is aided by its affordability. Rents are comparatively low, as is the city's unemployment rate. Fort Worth is the working class neighbor to its more glamorous neighbor, Dallas, and that's reflected in the industries that dominate here, including manufacturing and airlines, which include American Airlines, which is based here.



  1. Houston
  • Median annual salary: $26,849.
  • Unemployment rate: 8.2 percent.
  • Median rent: $1,311.

As with many cities on this list, Houston's attractiveness as a haven for job seekers is driven in part by strong population growth, combined with a "moderately low" unemployment and a low cost-of-living. Dominant industries include health care research, manufacturing, aerospace and alternative -- or "green" -- energy.



  1. Denver
  • Median annual salary: $32,051.
  • Unemployment rate: 9.1 percent.
  • Median rent: $931.

Denver is situated near the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, making it a great place for those who like living in a big city but also appreciate easy access to wilderness and outdoor activities. Though it's no longer the bargain it once was, the cost-of-living is comparatively low, and the region's economy is well diversified. Top industries here include aerospace, broadcasting, telecommunications and health care, which has seen a 23 percent increase in employment during the last five years.



  1. San Francisco
  • Median annual salary: $46,777.
  • Unemployment rate: 8.6 percent.
  • Median rent: $2,702.

Living in San Francisco is expensive, but the exponential increase in rent, compared to other cities on this list, is matched by higher salaries. A frequent destination for tourists, San Francisco's proximity to the Silicon Valley nearby has fashioned the city into a tech hub, with some of the best known names in the business based here or nearby: Facebook Inc., Google Inc., Twitter Inc., Yelp Inc. and more.



  1. Washington
  • Median annual salary: $43,993.
  • Unemployment rate: 10.2 percent.
  • Median rent: $1,823.

The nation's capital endured tough times during the '60s, '70s and '80s, as residents fled the city for the suburbs. But the draw of thousands of well-paying jobs, in both the private and public sectors, has helped fuel Washington's revival. NerdWallet says that although the unemployment rate and cost of living are high, a higher-than-average median income makes the city more affordable for job seekers.



  1. Austin, Texas
  • Median annual salary: $31,170.
  • Unemployment rate: 6.2 percent.
  • Median rent: $968.

Topping NerdWallet's Best Cities for Job Seekers list, Austin offers the best combination of attractive qualities for those looking for work. It's unemployment rate, by comparison, is low, salaries are decent and rents reasonable. It's also a fast growing city with burgeoning biotech and tech sectors. IBM, Apple Inc. and Google all have a presence here, and computing-giant Dell Inc. calls Austin home.





Source: AOL

Most Undesirable Job In America?

When you were last at The Cheesecake Factory, did you know that the person who scribbled down your order doesn't have any paid sick days? Did you know the person who made your Mud Pie Mojo at Coldstone Creamery is very likely earning under $9 an hour? If she's working 40 hours a week, that's an annual income of $19,000 -- without taking a single weekday off.

The Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, a New York-based nonprofit, tries to raise awareness about the plight of low wage restaurant workers. In its newly updated 2012 Diner's Guide, the group rates some of the country's most well-known chain restaurants on how they treat their employees. And according to the report, almost none of them treat them well at all.
The chains are judged in four main categories.
  • Pay: Do any of the tipped workers earn less than $5 an hour, and are any of the non-tipped workers making less than $9? ROC-United deems both of these to be a non-livable wage, and it's very likely that many of the employees are actually earning the federal minimum wage for tipped workers of $2.13 an hour. This "sub-minimum wage" was originally intended to be half the ordinary minimum wage, but it's plummeted in comparison over the last two decades, frozen since 1991 due to the restaurant industry's lobby, the National Restaurant Association, and the man at its helm, Herman Cain.
  • Paid sick days: Do employees have to forgo wages when they get the flu?
  • Ability for advancement: Have at least half of current employees been promoted in their time on the job? ROC-United argues that this indicates whether these jobs could ever be parlayed into secure, forward-moving careers.
  • Employer ethics: ROC-United deems a restaurant chain is taking the "high road to profitability" if it participates in its "Restaurant Industry Roundtable," which it says is devoted to promoting sustainable business practices.

The list of chain restaurants that fail to make the grade reads like a list of pretty much every well-known restaurant in this here United States. Find out which restaurants are considered great places to work. And read about the four restaurants that are, in the group's view, exceptionally crummy places to work.

1. Applebee's
The lowest tipped wage is under $5 an hour. The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

2. Arby's
The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days.

3. Baskin-Robbins
The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of employees have ever moved up a position.

4. Bob Evans
The lowest tipped wage is under $5 an hour. The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

5. Bojangles'
The lowest tipped wage is under $5 an hour. Non-tipped wages earn under $9 an hour. No paid sick days.

6. Boston Market
The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

7. Buffalo Wild Wings
The lowest tipped wage is under $5 an hour. Non-tipped wages earn under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

8. Burger King
The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

9. California Pizza Kitchen
The lowest tipped wage is under $5 an hour. The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

10. Captain D's Seafood Kitchen
Tipped wages are under $5 an hour. Non-tipped wages earn under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

11. The Cheesecake Factory
The lowest tipped wage is under $5 an hour. The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days.

12. Chick-Fil-A
The lowest tipped wage is under $9 an hour. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

13. Chili's Grill & Bar
The lowest tipped wage is under $5 an hour. The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

14. Chuck E. Cheese's
The lowest tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

15. Cold Stone Creamery
The lowest tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days.

16. Cracker Barrel
The lowest tipped wage is under $5 an hour. The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days.

17. Dairy Queen
The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour.

18. Denny's
The lowest tipped wage is under $5 an hour. The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days.

19. Domino's Pizza
The lowest tipped wage is under $5 an hour. The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days.

20. Dunkin' Donuts
The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

21. Einstein Bros. Bagels
The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

22. Friendly's
The lowest tipped wage is under $5 an hour. No paid sick days.

23. Hard Rock Cafe
The lowest tipped wage is under $5 an hour. The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days.

24. Hooters
The lowest tipped wage is under $5 an hour. The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

25. Houlihan's
The lowest tipped wage is under $5 an hour. The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

26. IHOP Restaurants
The lowest tipped wage is under $5 an hour. The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days.

27. Jack In The Box
The lowest tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days.

28. KFC
The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

29. Legal Sea Foods
The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

30. McDonald's
The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days.

31. Outback Steakhouse
The lowest tipped wage is under $5 an hour. The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

32. Panda Express
The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

33. Panera Bread

The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days.

34. Papa John's
The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

35. Pizza Hut
The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

36. Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen
The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days.

37. Quiznos
The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

38. Sonic
The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

39. Starbucks
The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days.

40. T.G.I. Friday's
The lowest tipped wage is under $5 an hour. The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

41. Taco Bell
The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

42. Waffle House
The lowest tipped wage is under $5 an hour. The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.

43. Wendy's
The lowest non-tipped wage is under $9 an hour. No paid sick days. Less than half of current employees have ever moved up.





Source: AOL

5 Flextime-Friendly Companies


Richard Jordan says he is working "longer and odder hours" than ever before, and he couldn't be happier about it. Jordan, a project manager in the Open Work Services Group of Sun Microsystems, has been working from home for the last six years, ever since he and his wife made the decision to move out of San Francisco to raise their four children in the Sierra Foothills of California, 140 miles from Sun's office. Without the conventional boundary between in-office and out-of-office time, Jordan estimates that he works 10-20 percent longer hours than he used to, placing international calls at all hours of the day and night. But he also has the flexibility to spend time with his children, lending a hand with activities such as school pick-up and drop-off. Is the trade-off worth it?
"Absolutely," Jordan says, acknowledging that he has little interest in ever returning to a conventional work schedule. "I can't leave my job until the rest of the world catches up," he adds, laughing.
The world might catch up sooner than Jordan realizes. In the 2006 Benefits Survey by the Society for Human Resource Management, 57 percent of human resource professionals reported that their organizations offered flextime options to employees. And working parents aren't the only ones who benefit from flexible work arrangements.
Whether it gives them the opportunity to avoid commuter traffic jams or to spend more time on their outside interests, everyone stands to gain when employers make a commitment to improving work/life balance.
Definitions of flexible work arrangements
  • Flextime: Employees set the start and finish time of their workday (within parameters established by their employer).

  • Telecommute: Employees do not have a desk in a central office (and typically work from home or some other non-office setting).

  • Compressed Work Week: Employees work longer hours, completing their weekly hours in fewer days.

  • Job Sharing: Two or more employees share the responsibilities of one job, alternating work days.

  • Results- or Goal-oriented: Employees have no set hours, but are expected to complete projects or meet goals within a specific timeframe.
    Five companies that offer flexible work arrangements Sun Microsystems, Inc.
    Company profile: "An innovative industry leader in servers, storage, software and services with a 100 percent focus on network computing."
    What they offer: 40 percent of Sun employees participate in the company's "Open Work" program, in which they have the freedom to work flexible hours and off-site. Employees in the Open Work program averaged more than a 34 percent gain in productivity, and gave the program a satisfaction rating of over 80 percent on metrics that track work/life balance. Richard Jordan reports that Sun employees who work from home score the highest of all employees in performance ratings, followed by employees who work flexible hours, and then employees who work in the office.
    KPMG LLP
    Company profile: "A global network of professional firms providing audit, tax and advisory services."
    What they offer: "We have a firm-wide flextime policy as part of our approach to flexibility," says Barbara Wankoff, KPMG's national director of workplace solutions. Wankoff estimates that 70 percent of KPMG employees work flexible hours. Other components of KPMG's "culture of flexibility" include compressed work weeks and "jump-start" Fridays during the summer (when employees are encouraged to leave at 3 p.m.). "Feedback has been very positive," Wankoff says. A recent employee survey revealed that employees "strongly agree they have the flexibility they need," and that even with the scheduling freedom, "people continue to uphold their professional responsibilities."
    Best Buy Co., Inc.
    Company profile: "A specialty retailer of consumer electronics, personal computers, entertainment software and appliances."
    What they offer:
    60 percent of the employees at Best Buy's corporate campus participate in Results-Only Work Environments (ROWE), with nearly 75 percent predicted involvement by March 2007. As part of the ROWE program, the hours of the workday are not defined. Employees and management have the autonomy to complete their work wherever and whenever they choose as long as they achieve set results.
    PNC Financial Services Group, Inc.
    Company profile: "A highly diversified and growing financial services organization spanning the retail, business and corporate markets."
    What they offer: "Nearly half of our 25,000 employee work force is on some type of flexible arrangement including job sharing, telecommuting and compressed work weeks," says Darcel Kimble of PNC's corporate communications group. A 2005 study by the non-profit organization Corporate Voices for Working Families found that a compressed work week pilot program at PNC resulted in: work that had previously taken two days being done in one day; absenteeism dropping from 60 days to nine days; improved customer service; and the company saving over $100,000 in turnover costs.
    PricewaterhouseCoopers
    Company profile: "Provides industry-focused assurance, tax and advisory services to build public trust and enhance value for its clients and their stakeholders."
    What they offer: Jennifer Duris, a manager in PwC's office of diversity, where she is responsible for Worklife and Flexible Work Arrangements, says that flexible work arrangements are "available to all staff." While just over 6 percent of PwC employees have a formal flextime arrangement, Duris estimates that more than 40 percent work flexible hours on an informal basis. The options available include: flextime hours, compressed work weeks and telecommuting (every employee is given a laptop).



  • Source: careerbuilder

    8,500 New Work-From-Home Job Openings This Week


    Work-from-home careers were once the domain of ambitious housewives who wanted to make a bit of extra money by selling cosmetics or housewares while still raising their kids. Not anymore. According to latest Census Bureau figures, nearly 1 in 10 workers work from home, as both men and women, baby boomers and Generation Y, crave the flexibility. But where are the best opportunities? Which sectors have the most job openings?
    work from home jobs: salesAOL Jobs compiled a list of the Top 10 work-from-home jobs, as determined by the number of listings available this week on CareerBuilder (an AOL Jobs sponsor) -- more than 8,500 of them. Some results show broad categories, while others are specific jobs, so there may be some overlap in the number of openings. Also provided is data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics on forecasts for growth in each category or field.
    There's something here for everybody, regardless of age or education. Take a look and tell us: Which jobs are you interested in, and why? (Hint: To get the results we did, click on the link to the career field in which you're interested and then add "work from home" to your search query.) Happy job hunting!


    1. Sales
    A job in sales can be a rewarding career for those with the right temperament. It requires a desire to please customers and sometimes going the extra mile to ensure that clients are happy. Work-from-home sales jobs typically involve selling some type of product, such as cosmetics, toys or nutritional supplements, but also includes careers such as:

    Outlook: Sales is a broad field, so it's difficult to forecast how many jobs will be created in coming years. A random sampling of sales careers posted on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website showed average to faster-than-average growth in the number of jobs through 2020.
    • Number of openings: 2,683*


    2. Health Care
    Home-based health-care jobs typically involve caring for elderly or disabled patients or providing therapy to those with injuries in their homes. Other jobs, such as personal fitness trainer, may require working with clients at a gym, though the position itself may be based at home.
    Outlook: The demand for health-care workers remains strong and is expected to continue to grow for the foreseeable future, especially among skilled workers.
    • Number of openings: 1,248


    3. Customer Service
    Advances in technology mean many more customer service jobs are making their way into peoples' homes. Once reserved mainly for call centers, many companies, including large ones, such as US Airways and Sears, have turned to virtual customer-service agents to answer customer queries about products, services and information.
    Outlook: Estimates show all customer service jobs growing by 15 percent, or nearly 340,000 jobs, through 2020, according to the BLS.
    • Number of openings: 1,185


    4. Skilled Labor - Trades
    Workers employed in skilled trades perform all kinds of jobs that many of us either don't have the time or ability to do. They include these:

    Outlook: With the number of union-sponsored apprenticeships dwindling in the skilled trades, the demand for workers in these fields is outpacing demand. The need for electricians, for example, is expected to grow by 22 percent -- faster than average -- through 2020, according to BLS forecasts.
    • Number of openings: 748


    5. Transportation
    A home-base job involving transportation typically involves goods or people where they need to be, and includes positions such as:

    As you might expect, these jobs can involve long hours on the road and possibly nights away from home.
    Outlook: According to BLS forecasts, many the number of jobs involving transportation are expected to increase at an average pace through the end of the decade.
    • Number of openings: 711


    6. Nurse
    Hospitals and clinics are often the first places that come to mind when thinking about where nurses work. But as the large baby boomer generation ages, there's been a corresponding increase in the demand for health care professionals to work in home-based jobs such as:

    Outlook: Nurses have been in high demand for several years and the need is expected to continue. The BLS says that the field is expected to grow faster or much faster than average, especially among those with more education and training, such as registered nurses.
    • Number of openings: 642


    7. Finance
    Though jobs in finance are often associated with those at banks or insurance company offices, a growing number in the field are working from home. They include careers such as:

    Such jobs typically require a bachelor's degree and some require state certification, but qualifications vary, depending on the job and candidates' experience.
    Outlook: The BLS says jobs in finance, generally, are expected to grow faster than average through 2020.
    • Number of openings: 468


    8. Administrative - Clerical
    Home-based clerical jobs aren't that much different from traditional office-based jobs and include duties such as typing, data entry, answering calls and transcribing records. Performing these tasks from home likely means workers must have a computer and access to the Internet. Employers typically require clerical workers to have at least a high-school diploma.
    Outlook: The need for workers to perform general clerical tasks is expected to grow about as fast as average, according to the BLS.
    • Number of openings: 331


    9. Trainer
    Trainer is a catch-all term that includes lots of jobs in many different sectors, including:

    A desire to teach and help others learn is key to being successful as a trainer, and educational requirements vary considerably, depending on the field. Becoming a fitness trainer, for example, often doesn't require a college degree, though certification may be necessary, depending on the client or company you contract with.
    Outlook: Depending on the field of specialty, the BLS forecasts job growth for the broad category of trainers to range from average to much faster than average during the next seven years.
    • Number of openings: 292


    10. Accounting
    The job of the accountant is rather simple: to keep financial matters in order. But it's a task that lots of people aren't adept at, which is why so many of us have to rely on them, especially at tax time. There's no shortage of accountants employed at large financial firms and other corporations, but the lone accountant toiling away in his or her den is just as common.
    Outlook: Accountants typically hold at least a bachelor's degree, according to the BLS, which forecasts demand in the profession to grow about on average through 2020.
    • Number of openings: 289




    Source: AOL

    Least Stressful Job In America Is


    least most stressful jobs With all the challenges facing today's working Americans, having a low-stress job can go a long way toward improving quality of life. What makes a job low stress? CareerCast says it's a combination of factors, including work environment, job competitiveness and risk.
    The employment website recently examined more than 200 different professions to determine which jobs offer the least (and most) stress, and the results below may surprise you. Some of the jobs pay modestly -- under $30,000 a year -- but others pay more than $50,000 a year.

    And contrary to what you might imagine, the least stressful job in the U.S. -- at least according to CareerCast  is also the one that requires the most education and training.

    Take a look, and then let us know: Which do you think is the least stressful job in America?

    10 Least Stressful Jobs of 2013
    1. Drill Press Operator
      Median Annual Salary: $31,910

    2. Librarian
      Median Annual Salary: $54,500

    3. Hair Stylist
      Median Annual Salary: $22,500

    4. Dietician
      Median Annual Salary: $53,250

    5. Audiologist
      Median Annual Salary: $66,660

    6. Medical Laboratory Technician
      Median Annual Salary: $46,680

    7. Jeweler
      Median Annual Salary: $35,170

    8. Medical Records Technician
      Median Annual Salary: $32,350

    9. Seamstress or Tailor
      Median Annual Salary: $25,850

    10. University Professor
      Median Annual Salary: $62,050




    Source: AOL

    10 Careers With Rock-Bottom Unemployment Rates

    lowest unemployment rate jobs The sluggish economy has many workers anxious about job security. Yet despite the nation's high 7.8 percent unemployment rate, there are careers out there with jobless rates so low as to nearly guarantee a job to anyone qualified to work in those fields.
    What kinds of jobs are they? Of the 10 listed here, compiled from Bureau of Labor Statistics data, most are high skill and require extensive education, but some require only a high-school diploma or certification. They aren't all glamorous; a few can even be dangerous. But with unemployment rates below 1 percent, many job seekers likely will still find them attractive.
    Take a look and tell us what you think.

    10. Information security analysts:
    • Unemployment rate: 0.9 percent.*
    • Median annual pay: $75,660.*
    • Entry-level education: Bachelor's degree.
    • Number of jobs (2010): 302,300.*
    • Projected employment growth: 22 percent (faster than average), or 65,700 jobs.*

    Find a job as an information security analyst.

    9. Audiologists:
    • Unemployment rate: 0.8 percent.
    • Median annual pay: $66,660.
    • Entry-level education: Doctoral or professional degree.
    • Number of jobs (2010): 13,000.
    • Projected employment growth: 37 percent (much faster than average), or 4,800 jobs.

    Find a job as an audiologist.

    8. Physicians and surgeons:
    • Unemployment rate: 0.8 percent.
    • Median annual pay: $40,300.
    • Entry-level education: Doctoral or professional degree.
    • Number of jobs (2010): 691,000.
    • Projected employment growth: 24 percent (faster than average), or 168,300.

    Find a job as an physician or surgeon.

    7. First-line supervisors of correctional officers:
    • Unemployment rate: 0.6 percent.
    • Median annual pay: $55,910.
    • Entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent.
    • Number of jobs (2010): 41,500.
    • Projected employment growth: 6 percent (slower than average), or 2,300.

    Find a job as a corrections officer.

    6. Petroleum engineers:
    • Unemployment rate: 0.6 percent.
    • Median annual pay: $114,080.
    • Entry-level education: Bachelor's degree.
    • Number of jobs (2010): 30,200.
    • Projected employment growth: 17 percent (fast as average), or 5,100 jobs.

    Find a job as a petroleum engineer.

    5. First-line supervisors of firefighting and prevention workers:
    • Unemployment rate: 0.4 percent.
    • Median annual pay: $68,240.
    • Entry-level education: Post-secondary certificate or training.
    • Number of jobs (2010): 60,100.
    • Projected employment growth: 8 percent (slower than average), or 4,900 jobs.

    Find a job as a firefighter.

    4. Judges, magistrates and other judicial workers:
    • Unemployment rate: 0.4 percent.
    • Median annual pay: $91,800.
    • Entry-level education: Varies, but a law degree is typical.
    • Number of jobs (2010): 62,700.
    • Projected employment growth: 7 percent (slower than average), or 4,600 jobs.

    Find a job as a judge, magistrate or other judicial worker.

    3. Biomedical engineers:
    • Unemployment rate: 0.4 percent.
    • Median annual pay: $81,540.
    • Entry-level education: Bachelor's degree.
    • Number of jobs (2010): 15,700.
    • Projected employment growth: 62 percent (much faster than average), or 9,700 jobs.

    Find a job as a biomedical engineer.

    2. Directors, religious activities and education:
    • Unemployment rate: 0.3 percent.
    • Median annual pay: $36,170.
    • Entry-level education: Bachelor's degree.
    • Number of jobs (2010): 126,000.
    • Projected employment growth: 17 percent (average), or 21,200.

    Find a job as a director of religious activities and education.

    1. Astronomers and physicists:
    • Unemployment rate: 0.3 percent.
    • Median annual pay: $105,430.
    • Entry-level education: Doctoral or professional degree.
    • Number of jobs (2010): 20,600.
    • Projected employment growth: 2,800.

    Find a job as an astronomer or physicist.





    Source: AOL

    Best Jobs For 2013 And Beyond


    best growing careers 2013

    Most lists of "best" careers are based mainly on U.S. Department of Labor information. That is inadequate for determining the growing careers of 2013 for a number of reasons:
    • Often the information was collected years ago.
    • Some of the information is supplied by each field's professional association, which has an interest in making the career appear desirable.
    • Department of Labor reports offer only objective statements. Not everything important can be reduced to an objective fact.


    I developed this list of the best growing careers in 2013 -- by combining both facts and my educated hunches. Of course, none of these careers might be right for you, so consider this best-careers list as merely one stop on your search for a well-suited career.


    Helping Professions

    Physician Assistant. ObamaCare will put 40 million more Americans plus 11 million illegals (after "comprehensive immigration reform") on the covered health care rolls. There aren't enough physicians to go around, so more care will be provided by physician assistants. PA training is much shorter and less expensive, pay approaches six figures, and PAs get to do most of what physicians do, indeed, the things likely to yield happy endings: wellness exams, preliminary diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.

    Genetic Counselor. Over the course of a genetic counselor's career, the genetic bases for ever more diseases will be discovered. As a result, genetic counselors will be in ever greater demand, for example, to help couples make decisions such as, "You have a 25 percent chance of passing on the genes for alcoholism. Do you want to get pregnant?"

    Optometrist. Optometrists are halfway between the ophthalmologist who does most eye surgery and the optician who helps you pick out frames and makes your glasses. Optometrists are the ones who keeps asking you, "Better with lens 1 or 2?" and before long, you can't tell, making you feel like an idiot. But optometrists are far from idiots. Four years post-bachelors and you have status, six-figure income, and get to be called doctor but are unlikely to get an emergency call in the middle of the night, "Dr Eyeball, I need new contact lenses, now!" But you are likely to have a high percentage of satisfied customers: Optometrists "cure" a high percentage of their patients.

    Audiologist. Audiologists are the ear equivalent of optometrists except that it's only three-years post-bachelor's until they can call you "doctor." And today's new smaller, computerized hearing aids, which not only improve hearing but relieve tinnitus, are more likely to make your patients happy. And, indeed, you are likely to have patients, thanks to the aging boomer bubble.

    Orthodontist. Those braces and rubber bands may cost the orthodontist a pittance, but the labor rate is substantial. Average reported pay is over $200,000, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Another plus: orthodontist is one of the few professions in which your patients see you frequently over months, even years, so you can develop a relationship. A minus? Lots of school: three years of dental school followed by two to three of orthodontic training. You have to install a lot of braces and rubber bands to pay for all that.

    Tutor. K-12 standards are ratcheting up. For example, see the Common Core Standards, which are guiding many states; I no doubt couldn't pass them all. So tutors will likely grow in demand. And tutoring is a particularly rewarding form of teaching because, one-on-one, you can easily individualize and develop relationships impossible to make if you're teaching 25 students at a time, let alone five periods of 25 per period. That's not to say that tutoring is a piece of cake. It's actually quite an art.

    College Counselor. Colleges hire college counselor-types to woo students to their college. Parents and some schools hire counselors to help kids find and get into a well-suited college. Self-employed college counselors provide more comprehensive guidance. NACAC, a strong professional organization, helps prepare you. Neat niche: With the incomprehensibly high cost of college: financial aid counseling.


    Data-Centric Professions

    Health Informatician. Doctors and nurses are turning to computers to aid in diagnosis and treatment. Computers are also being used to share information among the health care team about individual patients and, more broadly, about what's working and not in curing the panoply of diseases. Computers also increasingly improve information flow between clinician and patient. The health informatician, part IT specialist, part medical person, part human factors/interface specialist, is a wizard behind it all.

    Program Analyst. In this government job, you or your team designs, plans, and/or evaluates innovative programs--from the latest effort to close the achievement gap to a project to reduce energy usage in government buildings. Often, only a bachelor's degree is required. And like most government jobs, even post-fiscal cliff spending deals are unlikely to cut into the enticing combination of good salary and generous benefits, plus ample days off: holidays, vacation days, and sick days. Thank you, taxpayer!

    Data Analyst. Ever more business decisions are based on analyzing who buys what, when, and how. Database analysts mine the often unimaginably large datasets to provide that information. Neat Niche: social media data analyst. Your Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and blog posts hold abundant information about your buying habits. Personally, I don't mind companies knowing mine -- I'd much rather see ads personalized to me than, for example, commercials for Tampax.

    Auditor. Another of President Obama's priorities is to increase hiring of auditors as overseers of corporations and to increase IRS tax collections. That will make the job market robust for this subset of accounting.

    Counterterrorism Specialist. Alas, it's difficult to foresee a situation in which demand for counterterrorism experts will decline. The military, FBI, CIA and other federal agencies will likely continue to hire, especially people with Middle Eastern language and cultural competence.


    Hands-On Professions

    Firefighter. In most major cities, firefighters receive solid, well-benefited pay. Some of that is to compensate for the periodic heroics, but firefighters do spend a lot of time just hanging out at the firehouse. And job security is maximum. Whenever government pushes for a tax hike, it trots out, "If you don't vote for the tax increase, we'll have to cut police and fire services." And voila, the tax is approved and the police and firefighters maintain their jobs.

    Handyperson. The everyone-to-college push and the growing implication that that blue-collar workers are second-class citizens is leaving America short of handypersons. When I tell my friends I have a good handyman, their eyes widen: "Would you give me their name and phone number?"

    Landscape Architect. Whether it's building an amusement park or a corporate park, restoring a wetland or a disaster-destroyed suburb, or even matching the exterior of a mini-mansion to its upscale interior, landscape architects combine artistry with science and is one of the few professions in which you spend significant time both indoors and outdoors.

    Home Stager. The real estate market may be beginning to rebound and that means more homes on the market. In recent years, home stagers have become a de rigueur part of preparing a home for sale: Move out the moose head; move in the inoffensive but attractive decor.

    Energy Engineer. Whether figuring out how to make solar more than a bit-player in the energy solution, wringing more mileage from a gallon of gas, or creating or operating safer nuclear plants, this is a particularly viable and critical technical profession.

    Crane Operator. If you were one of those kids who loved to play with farm machinery or even just were fascinated by Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, you might consider this career, one of blue collars' best-paying: Union crane operators make well into six figures.

    Harbor Pilot. (sometimes called maritime pilot.) If you were impressed by crane operators' pay, wait 'til you hear what the typical harbor pilot makes: $200,000 to $400,000 a year. And it's not exactly hazard pay: Your job is, on a boat, to shepherd large ships into port. No surprise, it's even more difficult to land a job as a harbor pilot than as a crane operator.


    Entrepreneurial Professions

    International Business Developer. A number of economies are growing faster than that of the U.S., notably in Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. Corporations capitalize on that by using business developers to expand operations and to create joint ventures and licensing agreements.

    Mobile Retailer. Bricks-and-mortar stores are expensive. Online stores face worldwide competition. Those aren't a problem with cart- and truck-based businesses, for example, an espresso cart or flower stand in a high-foot-traffic location. If one outlet doesn't generate enough income, clone it until it does. Worried about lack of status? You can tell your friends you're the president and CEO of Bloomies, a chain of florists with branches throughout Chicagoland.
     
     
     
     

    Source: AOL

    Top 10 Companies Hiring Part-Time Workers



    While the economy has struggled and full-time positions have become harder to find, employers have been busy hiring part-time workers. Whether you're looking for the flexibility of a part-time schedule or just to bring in extra money, there are thousands of part-time jobs available now. Here are the 10 companies with the most part-time positions posted this week on CareerBuilder (an AOL Jobs sponsor):

    1. The Vitamin Shoppe: 3,225 part-time openings.

    The Vitamin Shoppe is a New Jersey-based retailer of nutritional supplements. They also operate stores in Canada under the name "VitaPath". The company provides approximately 8,000 different skus of supplements through its retail stores and over 20,000 different skus of supplements through its online retail websites.

    Employee Review: "Good growth opportunities and stores opening all over the US all year 'round. Company based out of NJ, so more progressive policies on employment and benefits. Good vacation, health, and dental benefits. Above average pay from minimum wage. Good policies on customer service interaction as well. Focus on Customer service vs. pushing products."*

    Find a part-time job now at The Vitamin Shoppe.


    2. Macy's: 2,818 part-time openings.
    Macy's Logo
    The iconic department store is going strong after over 150 years of business, selling mid-price to high-end brands at some 800 locations across the country. Its headquarters are in Cincinnati, Ohio, but its flagship store is in the heart of Manhattan, N.Y.

    Employee Review: "The management is competent. Employees are given a good discount and still able to use coupons. You can pick up more hours online when they become available."*

    Find a part-time job now at Macy's.


    3. AT&T: 2,689 part-time openings.

    Wireless giant AT&T continues to hire in large volumes, as many customers upgrade their smartphones and purchase tablets that require LTE data plans. It recently announced that it will be adding more wireless subscribers than expected.

    Employee Review: "Cutting edge technology, great opportunities for advancement, union representation for non-management."*

    Find a part-time job now with AT&T.


    4. Advantage Sales & Marketing: 2,543 part-time openings.

    Advantage Sales & Marketing provides outsourced sales, merchandising, and marketing services to consumer goods and food product manufacturers and suppliers. Owning more than 65 offices in the US and Canada, ASM does merchandising for 1,200 clients -- including Johnson & Johnson, Mars, Unilever, Energizer.

    Employee Review: "Long lasting business, able to adapt to changes in market. Well thought out benefits plan, and flexible time off for both vacation and illness."*

    Find a part-time job now with Advantage Sales & Marketing.


    Verizon Wireless Logo5. Verizon Wireless: 1,860 part-time openings.

    Verizon Wireless operates the largest mobile network in the United States. The Basking Ridge, New Jersey-based company is a subsidiary of Verizon Communications and Vodafone, although Verizon announced in September that it agreed to buy Vodafone's 45 percent stake in the company for $130 billion. Expected to close in the first quarter of 2014, it is the third largest announced deal in the world, Reuters reported.

    Employee Review: "The company has top drawer benefits for all employees and on the peer level, employees are united and very close knit, like family."*

    Find a part-time job now at Verizon Wireless.



    6. Toys 'R' Us: 1,723 part-time openings

    The longtime toy retailer based in Wayne, N.J., has more than 800 stores, and already is geared up for the holiday shopping season. "Many of our customers said to us, 'We hate the hectic pace of December, we want to have the opportunity to shop early,' " said Toys R Us Chief Marketing Officer Richard Barry. That means holiday discounts and promotions have already begun.

    Employee Review: "You will receive great hours from about July to December. The supervisors and management help out with any customer situation or question you may have, and they really like it when you show them that you have an interest in expanding your in-store knowledge and skill set."*

    Find a part-time job now at Toys 'R' Us

    Chipotle Logo7. Chipotle: 1,557 part-time openings.

    Chipotle is known for its use of organic meats throughout its more than 1,500 restaurants, which are located in 45 states. Since having been founded in 1993, the chain has since exploded and now counts some 37,000 employees. It is a pioneer in the "fast casual" dining movement.

    Employee Review: "The people I work with are awesome and the food is good. It pays my bills and makes me laugh. The schedule is super flexible but it's a lot of work. If you're looking for something easy and laid back, keep looking."*

    Find a part-time job now at Chipotle.


    8. Chrysler - Mopar: 1,485 part-time openings.

    Mopar is a division of Chrysler, to which it exclusively supplies auto parts and equipment. 'Mopar' refers to the term "motor parts" and has been embraced by car enthusiasts as a reference to its parent company.

    Employee Review: "Exposure to several cutting edge manufacturing practices, ability to work closely with senior management, salary and benefits are very good, good training options supplied by company."*

    Find a part-time job now at Chrysler - Mopar.



    9. WIS International: 1,460 part-time openings.

    WIS International is an inventory and data collection services company that serves retailers worldwide. Formed from a merger between Western Inventory Service Ltd. and Washington Inventory Service in 2005, it is the second largest inventory service provider in the world.

    Employee Review: "Working in a company where an ambiance is very acceptable and pressure is tolerable will inspire you to work to the peak of your knowledge, that is what WIS International could offer you not to mention your chance of promotion."*

    Find a part-time job now at WIS International.


    Securitas Logo10. Securitas USA: 1,453 part-time openings.

    Securitas is a Swiss security company with operations in 53 countries worldwide. The company offers a variety of specialized security services including background checks, security assessments, brand and intellectual property protection and cyber surveillance.

    Employee Review: "Work hours are good and there is plenty of overtime if needed."*

    Find a part-time job now at Securitas USA.

    *All employee reviews sourced from Glassdoor, a free jobs and career community that offers the world an inside look at jobs and companies. Reviews may have been edited for clarity.

    The 11 Fastest Growing Industries In The U.S.


    fastest growing industries

    Sageworks, the financial information company is out with its list of fast growing industries in America.

    "With manufacturing having played a pivotal role in the economic recovery, it's no surprise that several manufacturing industries are among the strongest growing over the last 12 months, based on current estimates," they write.

    "It's possible that those are tied together as businesses have started to use some of their cash to invest in needed equipment and upgrades," said Sageworks analyst Brad Schaefer. "All of those took really big hits in 2009 because companies weren't investing in a lot of equipment."

    Of the top 11 industries, employment services stands out as the one requiring the least amount of manual labor.

    "I see the employment services industry doing fairly well again, just because a lot of people are still uncertain about the economy and the political atmosphere, which contributes to businesses hiring temporary or contract workers instead of full-time employees," said Schaefer. "I don't think that's something that'll go away for the next year."

    Here's a table of the jobs:

    fastest growing industries

    Top 9 Craziest Job Titles


    crazy job titles
    When kids are asked what they want to do when they grow up, they usually have answers like teacher, fireman or chef. But of course, life sometimes throws a curve, and people can end up in careers that they never would have dreamed of. And then there are people who end up in jobs with titles that either make you barrel over with laughter, or require the use of a very large dictionary. At some point, hokey, crazy job titles became more common; back in 2006, Forbes noted the trend and blamed tech startups (including AOL, which had a CEO of Love at one point.)

    So what are the craziest, silliest job titles? Look below for a list of nine. But please note: We're not questioning the necessity of these jobs -- after all, someone has to be expert on subjects like pork rinds or pornography, or separating baby chickens at birth. 
     
    1. Director of First Impressions

    Sometimes a standard job title simply doesn't do justice to what the position both entails and means for the company at large. Because when you think about it, a receptionist really makes a first impression for company. So why not call a receptionist that? That's what companies like the Workforce Development Group do.

    2. Chief Troublemaker

    There are many ways to signal to your workers that you aren't an easily satisfied boss. One particularly overt strategy was adopted by Joanna Pineda, the founder of the Web design firm, Matrix Group International, who took the title of "chief troublemaker," because, as she told Forbes, she likes to "stir things up."


    3. Bride Kidnapping Expert

    The funny-sounding title is no joke. Russell Kleinbach has appeared in documentaries to discuss his research into the problem of women being forced into wedlock.

    4. Mother Repairer

    It may sound like a job for a licensed psychotherapist, but in fact, mother repairers restore metal phonographs by carefully removing dirt and particles from the grooves in a process that requires technical expertise.
     
    5. Pork Rind Expert

    If there's anyone who can claim to be a pork rind expert, it may be Jim Rudolph. He's the founder of Rudolph Foods, the Georgia-based company that claims to be the world's largest manufacturer of the popular snack. He's taken the title while appearing on the Food Network.

    6. Chick Sexer

    It sounds like an assignment for a higher being, but the separating of male and female chickens at birth is vital as it's only the pullets, baby females, that can be used for egg production. Because the baby chickens' organs are microscopic, specialized training is needed to identify the gender, "Dirty Jobs" host Mike Rowe told Jon Stewart during an appearance on "The Daily Show."

    7. Skull Grinder

    It's a rather dramatic name for what is a dirty task -- the cleaning of ear and nasal passages of pig brains for food production.

    8. Tonsorial Artist

    It's a job that sounds like a tongue-twister, but it's a term that has appeared on the census to describe the work of barbers and beauticians, according to the New Yorker.

    9. Chocolate Beer Specialist

    When Jim Koch, the founder of the Boston Beer company, was interviewed by the Food Network about his business, he had many titles to choose from. He could have referred to his commercial acting career in addition to his experience as a craft-brew entrepreneur. But instead he chose, "chocolate beer specialist," as was reported by Bloomberg Businessweek.
     



    Source:  AOL

    5 Jobs Where Pay Is Making A Comeback


    jobs in 2013

    Thanks to increases in the second half of 2012, wages grew by about 3.5% last year, according to PayScale. These five jobs saw the largest year-over-year pay increases.

    1. Media & Publishing
    • Pay growth in 2012: 4.6%
    • Median pay: $48,100

    From well-compensated television personalities to lesser paid newspaper scribes and bloggers, the media and publishing industry took a beating during the recession and industry layoffs soared.

    "After a bumpy 2008-2011 that resulted in little-to-no growth, this job category caught fire in 2012," said Katie Bardaro, PayScale's lead economist.

    Advertising spending, which fuels the industry's growth, has picked up during the recovery. Yet hiring still remains below pre-recession levels, said Bardaro, and firms are demanding greater productivity from workers.

    "It's usually cheaper to pay one productive worker a higher wage rate than to hire two less productive workers at a lower wage rate," she said.


    2. Information Technology
    • Pay growth in 2012: 4.4%
    • Median pay: $75,500

    Programmers, webmasters, systems analysts and other information technology workers managed to weather the recession pretty much unscathed.

    "We live in an age when our dependence on technology is only increasing and firms are consistently trying to increase their technological presence in order to match this demand," said Bardaro.

    Unemployment among IT workers has stayed consistently low and now stands at under 4%, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

    Companies have to compete to hire the best talent and that has sent wages about 10% higher than they were in early 2007 -- one of highest gains for any group over that period, according to PayScale.
     
     3. Construction
    • Pay growth in 2012: 4.2%
    • Median pay: $55,200

    Carpenters, roofers, laborers and other construction workers saw their unemployment rate soar to 27% at the height of the housing bust.

    As the housing market stages a comeback, home construction has nearly doubled from its 2009 low and builders are hiring again.

    "This wage growth tied together with the increase in housing starts are signs the construction industry is healing from the devastation it experienced," said Bardaro.

    The 1.3% increase in pay the industry saw in the fourth quarter was the biggest quarterly rise in four years. However, net wages for construction workers are about 1.7% below late 2008 levels.


    4. Marketing & Advertising
    • Pay growth in 2012: 4.2%
    • Median pay: $68,000

    Advertising and marketing are one of the first expenses businesses cut back on when they hit a financial rough patch -- and that was especially true during the recession.

    But as consumer spending recovers from those down years, companies are starting to hire copywriters, promoters and marketers again hoping to maintain or even gain market share, said Bardaro.

    As a result, wages are on the move. Year-over year pay climbed 4.2% last year, matching the best performance for the job category since PayScale began monitoring pay in 2007.


    5. Architects & Engineers
    • Pay growth in 2012: 3.9%
    • Median pay: $68,200

    When the housing bubble burst, architects were left with very few projects to work on.

    But they've had a good run lately, with billings up for four consecutive months through November, according to the American Institute of Architects.

    "These are the strongest business conditions we have seen since the end of 2007," said the institute's chief economist, Kermit Baker.

    Engineers, meanwhile, are in even higher demand. "Biomedical, petroleum, environmental and civil engineers are seeing some of the highest growth," said Payscale's Bardaro.

    Due mostly to gains by engineers, wages for this job category have grown faster than any other -- up 11.2% since PayScale started tracking them back in 2007.





    Source: AOL

    Top 10 Holiday Jobs in Demand


    holiday jobsThis is the season to be... hiring? As the holiday season approaches, there has been an uptick in seasonal job openings to help meet the demands of companies expecting an increase in traffic due to the holiday season.

    Top 10 seasonal jobs in demand:
    1. Sales Associates. A retail salesperson manages the customer experience. This frequently entails greeting the customer, assessing their needs and helping them find that particular item. Generally associates also help stock, refill, and clean displays and manage financial transactions such as purchases, returns, and refunds.
    2. Cashiers. Cashiers are responsible for performing monetary transactions by using a cash register. Cashiers interact with customers, ringing up sales, accepting money for items purchased, and assisting customers when there are price discrepancies.
    3. Customer Service Representatives. Customer service representatives input information about customer questions and complaints into a database and try to resolve the problem or transfer the inquiry to the appropriate department or to a manager who is authorized to do more for the customer.
    4. Drivers/Package Handlers. Drivers/package handlers transport packages and are continual lifting, lowering and sliding packages that typically weigh 25-35 lbs. and may weigh up to 70 lbs.
    5. Warehousing Associates. Warehousing associates lift and move, package, ship, receive, and gift-wrap inventory.
    6. Visual Associates. Visual associates make decisions on how to display merchandise.
    7. Greeters. Greeters welcome customers, help customers who need assistance, advise customers where to find store items, and clean merchandise.
    8. Specialty Food Workers. (bakers, meat cutters, cheese specialists) These roles generally include merchandising, ordering, inventory management, customer service, and sales.
    9. Photographers. Photographers often take pictures for special events such as holiday parties. Many stores and malls hire photographers during the holiday season to take family and child portraits.
    10. Santas. We all know what this guy does. And he needs to be cloned for the holiday season so he can show up in all those department stores and malls in between Thanksgiving and Christmas Day.


    Source: AOL

    10 Most Stressful Jobs In The U.S.


    Stress on the job has many sources. You may have a demanding boss or clients to please, work odd hours, or the duties themselves may occasionally put your health and well-being at risk.

    In fact, consistently putting oneself in the line of fire -- literally or figuratively -- is characteristic of the most stressful jobs in the U.S., according to a new survey by CareerCast.

    The employment website recently examined more than 200 different professions to determine which jobs offer the most (and least) stress, and the results below may surprise you. Some of the jobs pay modestly -- under $30,000 a year -- but others tip into six figures, suggesting that taking on more stress does at times have its rewards.

    Take a look, and then let us know: Which do you think is the most stressful job in America?

    10 Most Stressful Jobs of 2013:
    1. Police Officer
      Median Annual Salary: $55,010

    2. Taxi Driver
      Median Annual Salary: $22,040

    3. Newspaper Reporter
      Median Annual Salary: $36,000

    4. Photojournalist
      Median Annual Salary: $29,130

    5. Senior Corporate Executive
      Median Annual Salary: $101,250

    6. Public Relations Executive
      Median Annual Salary: $57,550

    7. Commercial Airline Pilot
      Median Annual Salary: $92,060

    8. Firefighter
      Median Annual Salary: $42,250

    9. Military General
      Median Annual Salary: $196,300

    10. Enlisted Military Personnel
      Median Annual Salary: $41,998
      (rank: E-7, 8 years experience.)

    Source: AOL

    Best Jobs For 2013


    new jobs in 2013If the Mayan calendar predictions are wrong and the world continues into 2013, those with bachelor's degrees will have an extra reason to celebrate the New Year. CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists have released the best bachelor's degree jobs for 2013 based on occupations with the most added jobs since 2010, and the list covers a wide variety of industries.

    "Where the U.S. will produce the most jobs in 2013 is likely to follow growth patterns of the last few years," says Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder. "It's no surprise that technology and engineering occupations comprise six of the top 10 positions on our list, but workers should also see more opportunities in production-related fields, marketing, health care and financial services. The competition for educated, specialized labor has intensified as market demands increase in both the manufacturing and services sectors."

    Check out the top 18 jobs for 2013 that require, on average, a bachelor's degree, along with the number of jobs added and percent growth since 2010.
    1. Software developer (applications and systems software): 70,872 jobs added, 7 percent growth

    2. Accountant and auditor: 37,123 jobs added, 3 percent growth

    3. Market research analyst and marketing specialist: 31,335 jobs added, 10 percent growth

    4. Computer systems analyst: 26,937 jobs added, 5 percent growth

    5. Human resources, training and labor relations specialist: 22,773 jobs added, 5 percent growth

    6. Network and computer systems administrator: 18,626 jobs added, 5 percent growth

    7. Sales representative (wholesale and manufacturing, technical and scientific): 17,405 jobs added, 4 percent growth

    8. Information security analyst, Web developer and computer network architect: 15,715 jobs added, 5 percent growth

    9. Mechanical engineer: 13,847 jobs added, 6 percent growth

    10. Industrial engineer: 12,269 jobs added, 6 percent growth

    11. Computer programmer: 11,540 jobs added, 3 percent growth

    12. Financial analyst: 10,016 jobs added, 4 percent growth

    13. Public relations specialist: 8,541 jobs added, 4 percent growth

    14. Logistician: 8,522 jobs added, 8 percent growth

    15. Database administrator: 7,468 jobs added, 7 percent growth

    16. Meeting, convention and event planner: 7,072 jobs added, 10 percent growth

    17. Cost estimator: 6,781 jobs added, 3 percent growth

    18. Personal financial adviser: 5,212 jobs added, 3 percent growth



    Source: AOL

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